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ID Needed for Voting?

Alabama

New ID law in effect for the first statewide election in 2014.

You must present one of the following forms of valid photo ID before voting:

  • Alabama driver's license or non-driver ID card issued by the Alabama DMV
  • Any other photo ID issued by Alabama, any other state government, or the US
  • US passport
  • Employee photo ID card issued by Alabama or the US
  • US military photo ID
  • Alabama photo voter ID card
  • Student or staff photo ID issued by a public or private college, university or postgraduate technical or professional school in Alabama
  • Tribal photo ID card

If you do not have a valid photo ID you  may vote only if you are identified by two election officials in the polling place as a voter on the poll list who is eligible to vote and the election officials execute an affidavit stating this. 

If you do not have a valid photo ID and the election officials are not able to identify you, you must cast a provisional ballot.

Free photo ID available!

If you do not have a photo ID you may obtain one from the Secretary of State. You are able to get a new photo ID card each time you move within the state.

Alaska

You will need to show your signed voter ID card, or any other signed ID that will allow the election worker to verify your signature. Examples include your driver's license, military ID, Indian ID, fish and game license, state ID card, passport, or senior citizen ID card. A picture ID is not necessary.

Arizona

You will be required to show proof of identity at the polling place before receiving a ballot. You will announce your name and place of residence to the election official and present one form of identification that bears your name, address, and photograph or two different forms of identification that bear your name and address. An identification is valid unless it can be determined on its face that it has expired.

Acceptable forms of identification with photograph, name, and address:

  • Valid Arizona driver's license
  • Valid Arizona non-operating identification license
  • Tribal enrollment card or other form of tribal identification
  • Valid U.S. federal, state, or local government issued ID

Acceptable forms of identification without a photograph that bear your name and address (two required):

  • Utility bill that is dated within 90 days of the date of the election. A utility bill may be for electric, gas, water, solid waste, sewer, telephone, cellular phone, or cable television
  • Bank or credit union statement that is dated within 90 days of the date of the election
  • Valid Arizona Vehicle Registration
  • Indian census card
  • Property tax statement of your residence
  • Tribal enrollment card or other form of tribal identification
  • Recorder's certificate
  • Valid U.S. federal, state, or local government issued ID, including a voter registration card issued by the county recorder
  • Arizona vihicle insurance
  • Any maining to the elector marked "Official Election Material"

Other acceptable forms of identification are one identification with name and photo of the elector accompanied by one non-photo identification with name and address.

  • Any valid photo identification from List 1 in which the address does not reasonably match the precinct register accompanied by a non-photo identification from List 2 in which the address does reasonably match the precinct register
  • U.S. Passport without address and one valid item from List 2
  • U.S. Military identification without address and one valid item from List 2

An identification is valid unless it can be determined on its face that it has expired.

Arkansas

Photo IDs are required. Several forms of ID are acceptable:

  • Driver's license
  • Photo ID card
  • Concealed handgun carry license
  • US Passport
  • State or Federal government employee identification
  • US military identification
  • ID card from an accredited post-secondary institution in Arkansas
  • Public assistance ID card

If you are a person who lives in a long-term or residential care facility licensed by the state you do not need to show a photo ID. You must have documentation from the facility administrator saying that you are a resident of the facility.

If you are a registered voter with no other form of photo ID, you can get a free photo ID from you county clerk's office. You must complete an application and sign an oath swearing you do not have any kind of photo ID. You must also provide the following information to the clerk:

  • A photo or non-photo identity document including full legal name and date of birth (such as: original or certified copy of a birth certificate, copy of marriage license application, notarized copy of state or federal tax return filed for the previous calendar year, paycheck or pay stub including the imprinted name of the applicant's employer, original Medicare or Medicaid statement to the applicant, original annual Social Security statement for the current or preceding calendar year, certified school record or transcript for the current or preceding calendar year, naturalization document, DD-214 form issued by the federal government to members of the military.)
  • Documentation of name and residential address (such as: utility or cable bill issued within the last 60 days, bank statement issued within the last 60 days, notarized copy of state or federal tax return filed for the previous calendar year, current, valid residential rental contract or receipt for rental payment within the last 60 days, homeowners' insurance policy or bill for current or preceding calendar year, mortgage, payment coupon, deed or property tax bill for current or preceding calendar year, personal property tax bill for current or preceding calendar year, current automobile registration receipt, W-2 issued by employer for the preceding calendar year.)
  • Evidence of registration or proof of application to register to vote
  • Complete application and oath for voter identification card form

Your voter ID card will not be prepared until the clerk has validated the registration information and processed the application. Once approved, the card will be mailed to the mailing address on the application. The ID card is valid as long as you live in the same county where it was issued and you remain registered to vote.

If you do not provide an ID at the polls you may cast a provisional ballot. The provisional ballot will be counted if you return to the county clerk or county election commission by noon the Monday after the election with either proof of identity or an affidavit swearing you do not have a photo ID because of indigence or a religious objecting to being photographed.

California

A first-time voter who registers and did not provide identification with their application, may need to show identification at the polls. To be safe, bring your driver's license or another photo ID.

Colorado

If you are voting by mail for the first time you may need to provide a photocopy of your identification with your ballot. Voters who recently registered for the first time and are voting by mail are required to provide a photocopy of their identification.

When voting in person you will need one of the following types of identification:

  • A valid Colorado driver's license
  • A valid identification card issued by the Colorado Department of Revenue
  • A valid U.S. passport
  • A valid employee identification card with a photograph of the eligible elector issued by any branch, department, agency, or entity of the U.S. government or Colorado, or by any Colorado county, municipality, board, authority, or other political subdivision of this state
  • A valid pilot's license issued by the Federal Aviation Administration or other authorized agency of the United States
  • A valid U.S. military identification card with photograph of the elector
  • A copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or other government document that shows the name and address of the elector. A cable bill, a telephone bill, documentation from a public institution of higher education in Colorado containing at least the name, date of birth, and residence address of the student elector, or a paycheck from a government institution are also sufficient forms of identification
  • A valid Medicare or Medicaid card
  • A certified copy of a U.S. birth certificate
  • Certified documentation of naturalization
  • A valid student identification card with a photograph of the eligible elector issued by an institute of higher education in Colorado.
  • A valid veteran identification card issued by the United States department of veterans affairs veterans health administration with a photograph of the eligible election
  • A valid identification card issued by a federally recognized tribal government certifying tribal membership

A Social Security number (or last four digits) is NOT a legal form of identification for voting in person.

Connecticut

You must either show identification or sign a one line affidavit at the polling place if you have not provided proper identification when registering. A photo ID is not required. Acceptable forms of ID at the polling place are:

  • A Social Security card
  • Any other preprinted form of identification that shows your name and address, name and signature, or name and photograph.

If you do not have identification, the affidavit form requires your name, residential address, date of birth, and signature. The affidavit states, under penalty of false statement, that you are the one whose name appears on the official checklist.

First time voters who registered to vote by mail and did not provide acceptable ID at registration must show identification at the polls or with their absentee ballots. Acceptable forms of identification include a copy of a current and valid photo ID or a copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or government document that shows your name and address. If you are a first time voter, you will be required to present identification and may not use the secretary of state's affidavit in lieu of acceptable ID.

Delaware

Identification is required ONLY if you have registered using the National Voter Registration Form and thus did not supply it originally. In that case, the voter must present current identification which includes a current and valid photo ID that shows full name and address. If a photo ID cannot be produced, a current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck or other government document that shows full name and address will be accepted. Identification is also required the first time you vote in person or with an in-person absentee ballot.

District of Columbia

Identification is required of first-time voters who register by mail and do not provide proof of identification with their application.

Florida

To vote at the polls, you must provide picture identification that also shows a signature OR picture identification and another form of ID with your signature.

Examples of accepted photo IDs with a signature are:

  • Florida driver's license
  • Florida identification card issued by the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles
  • United States passport
  • Debit or credit card
  • Military identification
  • Student identification
  • Retirement center identification
  • Neighborhood association identification
  • Public assistance identification

If you have additional questions about voter ID, please contact your local elections office.

Georgia

When you arrive at your polling place, you will be required to present one of the following forms of identification:

  • A Georgia driver's license, even if it is expired
  • A photo ID issued by a state or federal government agency
  • A valid U.S. passport
  • An employee ID card containing your photograph and issued by any branch, department, agency, or entity of the U.S. government, Georgia, or any county, municipality, board, authority, or other entity of Georgia
  • A valid U.S. military ID card
  • A valid tribal ID card.
  • If you do not have one of the above forms of ID, the State of Georgia offers a free Voter Identification Card.

If you are unable to show identification at the time of voting you may cast a provisional ballot which will be counted only if you present identification within the two day period following the election. For more information on the acceptable forms of photo ID and the free Voter Identification Card, please visit your state's resource.

Hawaii

A picture ID is needed for verification of your identity at the polls. You will be asked to sign a poll book to record that you voted at that polling place. Your voter registration notice is not an acceptable form of identification.

Idaho

All voters are required to show photo ID or sign a Personal Identification Affidavit to cast a regular ballot. Acceptable forms of ID include:

  • An Idaho driver's license or photo Identification Card
  • A U.S. passport or Federal photo identification card
  • A current student photo ID, issued by an Idaho high school or post secondary education institution.
  • A tribal photo identification card.

NOTE: The name on the ID must match the name on the registration list in the poll book but common abbreviations and nicknames are acceptable.

Illinois

Identification is not required to vote at the polls, although you will be required to verify your signature. However, there are individual circumstances that may require that identification be shown. In those cases, you must present a photo ID, and if the photo ID has an address, it must match the registration address. If a photo ID is not used, the document (examples of which are listed below) must show your name and address. This must be presented to an election judge before being permitted to vote.

If you do not present a required form on identification, you may vote on a provisional ballot. For further information, please see Provisional Voting below.

If you registered to vote by mail after January 1, 2003, and you did not submit a copy of the required identification with the registration application at that time, and you will be voting in a jurisdiction for the first time, then you will be required to submit a copy of one of the following:

  • Current and valid photo identification
  • Utility bill
  • Government check
  • Paycheck
  • Government document

Illinois voters who vote during the early voting period must vote in person and must provide a valid identification. Valid forms of identification for this purpose include a current driver's license, state-issued identification card, or another government-issued identification card.

Indiana

Photo ID is required of all voters casting a ballot in person. There are exceptions for certain confined voters and voters casting absentee ballots by mail. Acceptable forms of ID include: driver's license, passport, military ID or picture ID from the Bureau of Motor Vehicles. The criteria for acceptable ID include:

  • Photograph
  • A name which matches the voter registration record
  • An expiration date after Election Day
  • Must have been issued by the U.S. government or the state of Indiana

A student ID from an Indiana State school may only be used if it meets all of the four criteria specified above. A student ID from a private institution may not be used for voting purposes. For more information for college students, click here.

Iowa

You may need to show indentification at the poll if:

  • You registered to vote by mail after January 1, 2003 and you have never voted in a primary or general election in your county of residence
  • Your registration is inactive
  • You have moved from the address where you are registered to vote
  • Your right to vote is challenged
  • The precinct election officials do not know you

You can use any of these forms of identification:

  • Current and valid photo ID card
  • Copy of a current document that shows your name and address, such as: a utility bill, bank statement, government check, or paycheck
Kansas

Voters must show photo ID when casting a vote. Acceptable forms of ID include:

  • A driver's license or nondriver's ID card issued by Kansas, or by another state or district in of the U.S.
  • A concealed carry of handgun license issued by Kansas, or a concealed carry of handgun or weapon license issued by another state or district of the U.S.
  • A U.S. passport
  • An employee badge or ID document issued by a municipal, county, state, or federal government office or agency
  • A military ID issued by the U.S.
  • A student ID card issued by an accredited postsecondary institution of education in the state of Kansas.
  • A public assistance ID card issued by a municipal, county, state, or federal government office or agency.
  • An ID card issued by an Indian tribe

Photo ID is also required for early voting and absentee voting. EXCEPTIONS AVAILABLE: Persons over 65 may use expired documentation as proof of identity.

FREE ID: ID cards for persons over 17 years old are free if the applicant signs an affidavit attesting that the ID is needed for purposes of voting in Kansas and that the applicant does not possess any other form of identification qualifying as acceptable ID for voting. The applicant must also produce evidence that he/she is a registered voter in Kansas. Find that affidavit here. Unique among the states, Kansas provides free birth certificates to persons born in Kansas if needed to acquire a photo ID for voting.

Kentucky

ID is required, however photo ID is not required. Acceptable forms of ID include a personal acquaintance of the precinct officer, or a document such as a driver's license, Social Security card, or credit card or another form of ID containing both a picture and a signature.

Louisiana

To vote, you must either present a valid photo ID, or sign an affidavit if no photo ID is available. Acceptable photo ID includes:

  • A Louisiana driver's license
  • A Louisiana special ID card (you can get one for free at the Office of Motor Vehicles by showing your voter information card).
  • Any other generally recognized picture ID card that contains your name and signature

 

Maine

If you are already registered to vote, you do not need to provide identification to receive a ballot. If you are registering on Election Day, you will need to provide proof of identity and residency.

Maryland

You will be asked to provide identification at the polling place if:

  • You are voting for the first time in Maryland
  • You registered to vote by mail on or after January 1, 2003
  • You have not previously met the identification requirements

If you registered to vote by mail after January 1, 2006, you most likely satisfied the identification requirement during the registration process. If you did not satisfy the requirement, your county election board will have notified you and requested information to satisfy the identification requirement. You can satisfy the identification requirement by providing one of the following:

  • A copy of a current and valid photo ID (i.e., Maryland driver's license, MVA-issued ID card, student, employee or military ID card, U.S. passport, or any other state or federal government issued ID card.)
  • A copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck or other government document that shows your name and address.
Massachusetts

If you registered to vote by mail on or after January 1, 2003, you will be required to show identification when you vote for the first time in a federal election.

If you provide your driver's license number or the last four digits of your Social Security number on the voter registration form and those numbers are verified, you will not have to provide identification when you register to vote or at the polls. If you do not provide those numbers or if they cannot be verified (the acknowledgement of your voter registration that you receive in the mail will notify you) then you have to provide identification either at town or city hall prior to the election or at the polls when you vote. Identification must have your name and current address. Acceptable forms of identification including any of the following:

  • Current and valid photo identification
  • Government check or official document
  • Current utility bill
  • Paycheck or stub
Michigan

All voters are requested to show an acceptable form of photo identification at the polls. Your photo ID does not need to have your address on it. In addition, the name on your identification card may be a shorter form of your name. For example, Bill for William and Kathy for Katherine are acceptable. After showing your photo ID to the poll worker and signing the application, you may cast your ballot. Acceptable photo ID includes:

  • Driver's license or personal ID card issued by another state
  • Federal or state government-issued photo ID
  • U.S. passport
  • Military identification card with photo
  • Student identification with photo from a high school or an accredited institution of higher education
  • Tribal identification card with photo

Voters without photo ID: Michigan election law anticipates that not all voters will have photo ID. Voters who do not have acceptable photo ID or forgot to bring acceptable photo ID to the polls can vote like any other voter by signing an affidavit. Questions regarding the voter identification requirement can be directed to your local city or township clerk's office.

If you do not have a driver's license or other acceptable photo identification, you can get a state identification card at your local Secretary of State branch office for $10. State ID cards are free to individuals who are 65 or older or who are blind. Cards are also free to those who have had driving privileges terminated due to a physical or mental disability. Proof of identiy and residencey are requred when applying for a state ID card. Visit this site for details on what forms are acceptable in order to prive identity and residency, or call 888-767-6424.

Minnesota

You only need ID to vote if you have not registered before arriving at the polling precinct. You may register to vote at your polling place on Election Day. Options of proof of residence are as follows:

ID with current name and address:

  • Valid Minnesota driver's license, Minnesota learner's permit, Minnesota ID card or a receipt for any of these
  • Tribal ID card with your name, address, photo and signature

Photo ID plus a document with current name and address:

Accepted photo IDs:

  • Driver's license, state ID card or learner's permit issued by any state
  • US passport
  • US military ID card
  • Tribal ID card with name, signature and photo
  • Minnesota university, college or technical college ID card
  • Minnesota high school ID card

Accepted documents:

  • Residential lease or rental agreement (must be valid through Election Day)
  • Current student fee statement
  • Bill, account or start of service statement due or dated within 30 days of election for: phone, TV, internet services, solid waste or sewer services, electric, gas, water, banking or credit card, rent or mortgage payments

Registered voter who can confirm your name and address:

A registered voter from your precinct can go with you to your polling place to sign an oath confirming your address. One registered voter can vouch for up to eight others

College student ID - if a student housing list was provided:

College students can use a student photo ID card if their college provided a student housing list to election officials.

Valid registration in same precinct:

If you were previously registered in the precinct but changed names or moved within the same precinct, you only need to tell the elections official your previous name or address. You are not required to provide any additional documentation.

Notice of late registration:

If you registered to vote too close to Election Day, you may have received a Notice of Late Registration in the mail. This notice can be used to register on Election Day.

Staff person of a residential facility:

If you live in a residential facility, a facility staff person can go with you to the polls to confirm your address.

Mississippi

Photo ID is required in order to vote. You must show one of the following forms of ID - expired photo IDs are acceptable as long as they are not more than 10 years old:

  • A driver's license
  • Photo ID card issued by a branch, department or entity of the Staet of Mississippi
  • US passport
  • Government employee ID card
  • Firearms license
  • Student photo ID issued by an accredited Mississippi university, college or community/junior college
  • US military ID
  • Tribal photo ID
  • Any other photo ID issued by any branch, department, agency or entity of the US governemtn or any state government
  • Mississippi Voter ID Card

If you do not have any of these forms of ID, you can obtain a Mississippi Voter ID Card at no cost. You can apply for a Mississippi Voter ID card at any Circuit Clerk's office during normal business hours. Or call 1-855-868-3745 for more information.

 

Missouri

You must show an acceptable form of ID when going to vote. Acceptable forms of ID are as follows:

  • ID issued by the state of Missouri, an agency of the state, or a local election authority of the state
  • ID issued by the U.S. government or agency
  • ID issued by an institution of higher education, including a university, college, vocational or technical school located within Missouri
  • A copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck or other government document that contains your name and address
  • A driver's license or state ID card issued by another state

The Missouri DMV will issue free non-driver's licenses to those (with proper identification requirements,) who need them to vote.

Montana

You must present ID when voting. When you enter your polling place, an election judge will greet you, ask your name, and confirm that you are registered to vote in that precinct. He or she will then ask you to show ID. This can be any current photo ID that shows your name (for example, a valid driver's license, school ID, state ID, or tribal ID) or a current utility bill, bank statement, paycheck, voter confirmation notice, government check or other government document that shows your name and current address.

If you do not have any of these forms of ID, you can still vote by requesting and filling out a Polling Place Elector ID form. Or you can vote a provisional ballot.

Nebraska

Identification is required if you are a first-time voter who registered by mail and did not provide verification with your registration application. Please check with your local election officials to determine what form of ID is needed at the polls.

Nevada

Identification is necessary at the polls if you have not shown your ID when you registered. This is only required the first time you vote. Identification must show proof of residence, proof of identity and a picture is required. Examples of recommended identification include a driver's license or any government issued ID. If the current photo identification does not include the voters current address please bring, a copy of a current utility bill, bank statemet, government check, or other government document that shows voter's name and current residence address is required.

New Hampshire

A photo ID will be requested of you, but you may sign a simple affidavit.

Acceptable Federal and State Photo IDs (may be expired within the last five years, unless you are over 65 and then no expiration restrictions apply)

  • Driver's license issued by any state
  • Non-driver's photo ID from any state
  • US Armed Services phtot ID
  • US passport or passport card
  • NH photo ID issued by the DMV for voting purposes only

Student Photo IDs (no date is required)

  • NH schools including public and private colleges and universities, community colleges and licensed career schools
  • Public high schools and private high schools that are approved by the NH Department of Educations

Other

  • A photo ID deemed acceptable by a Supervisor of the Checklist, Moderator or Town or City Clerk
  • Verification of a person's identity by a Supervisor of the Checklist, Moderator or Town or City Clerk
  • An affidavit filled out and signed by the voter and an authorized election officer

If you do not have an approved photo ID you may get a free photo ID for voting purposes only by presenting a voucher from your town/city clerk to any New Hampshire DMV office that issues identification.

New Jersey

Identification is not required unless you are a first time voter who registered by mail and did not provide ID verification with application. If you registered to vote by mail in your county after January 1, 2003, and never voted in a federal election in the county, you are required to provide your county commissioner of registration with identification.

Acceptable Identification includes current and valid photo ID such as:

  • Driver's license
  • Student or job ID
  • Military or other government ID
  • Store membership ID
  • United States passport
  • Bank statement
  • Car registration
  • Government check or document
  • Non-photo driver's license
  • Rent receipt
  • Sample ballot
  • Utility bill
  • Any other official document

Every person registering to vote must provide his or her NJ driver's licensenumber or MVC non-driver ID number. If the registrant does not have either a driver's license or MVC ID, the last four numbers of his or her socialsecurity number must be provided. These numbers will be verified by theNew Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission. The registrant will be notified if the numbers cannot be matched. If the registrant does not have a driver's license, a MVC non-driver ID or social security number can be entered into that box on the registration form.

If you show identification, you will vote via the voting machine. If you do not show identification, you will vote via provisional ballot and have until the close of business on the second day after the election, to provide identification to the applicable county election office. You will be given a hand-out at the polling place that will tell you which county election office to contact.

New Mexico

You do not have to show a photo ID at the polls. If you registered to vote for the first time by mail and you did not provide a copy of a current and valid photo ID along with a current utility bill or bank statement, you will need to present these forms of ID when voting in person or absentee.

New York

If you are a new voter who is registering by mail, you will be required to show identification when you go to vote for the first time. If you are already registered at the board of elections or a state agency, you should not have to show identification at the polls. It is advisable for all new voters to bring identification when voting for the first time. Acceptable IDs to to vote are:

  • Passport
  • Government ID card
  • Military ID card
  • Student ID card
  • Public housing ID card
  • Any ID specified by HAVA and New York State law as acceptable
  • Utility bill
  • Bank statement
  • Paycheck
  • Government check (Social Security, tax refund, military paycheck or paycheck stub)
  • Other government documents with your name and address including but not limited to: voter registration card, hunting, fishing, or trapping license or firearm permit.
North Carolina

Identification is only required if you are a first time voter whose identification data did not match when you registered to vote. These voters will be notified by mail of the required ID needed, such as:

  • A current NC driver's license
  • Any other government issued photo ID
  • A utility bill, pay-stub, W-2, bank statement or a document from a government agency that shows your name and current address
    North Dakota

    Acceptable forms of identification must include a street address. P.O. Boxes do not establish residency and CANNOT be accepted.

    Acceptable forms of identification are:

    • Driver's license
    • Non-driver's ID card
    • Tribal government issued ID card
    • Student ID certificate (provided by ND college or university)
    • Long-term car ID certificate (provided by ND facility)

    If you are voting absentee, acceptable forms of ID are:

    • Any forms of ID listed above
    • Passport or Military ID - Only for ND residents living outside the US who do not possess one of the other forms of ID
    • Attester - an applicant without acceptable form of ID may use an attester. The attester must provide his or her name, ND drivers license, non-driver's, or tribal ID number and sign the absentee/mail ballot application form to attest to the applicant's ND residency and voting eligibility.
       
    Ohio

    All voters must show an ID at the polls in order to vote a regular ballot. Voters without ID will be able to vote using a provisional ballot after signing an affirmation statement swearing to the voter's identity. Acceptable forms of ID include:

    • Current photo ID issued by the state of Ohio or the U.S. government (even if it shows a previous address)
    • Photo Military ID
    • Bank statement
    • Current paycheck
    • Current government check
    • Current utility bill (including a cell phone bill)
    • Any current government-issued document showing your name and current address

    For voting purposes current means the document was issued on a date within one year immediately preceding the date of the election at which the voter seeks to vote, or has on it an expiration date which has not passed as of the date of the election in which the voter seeks to vote.

    Voters without one of these documents will still be able to vote using a provisional ballot by either providing the last four digits of the voter's Social Security number or by signing an affirmation statement swearing to the voter's identity and providing appropriate ID within 10 days.

    Oklahoma

    When voting in person you will need one of the following types of identification:

    • An Oklahoma driver's license
    • State identification card
    • A U.S. passport
    • Military identification
    • A voter identification card recieved by mail from the County Election Board when you registered to vote. The law allows use of the voter identification card even though it does not include a photograph or an expiration date.

    If you do not have proof of identity, you may only vote by provisional ballot. When you cast a provisional ballot you will be required to fill out and sign an affidavit swearing or affirming you are the person identified on the precinct voter registry. Your provisional ballots will be sealed inside a special envelope and not put through the voting device.

    After election day, County Election Board officials will review the information you provided on the affidavit and if it matches your voter registration information they will count your ballot. If the information you provided does not match your voter registration information your vote will be rejected.

    Oregon

    Oregon has a vote by mail process. Instead of using traditional polling places where voters go to cast ballots on Election Day, a ballot is mailed to each registered voter.

    You will need to sign the return envelope of your ballot. Your signature will be matched with your voter registration card to verify your identity.

    Pennsylvania

    Unless your are a first time voter, you do not need to show any ID to vote a regular ballot on Election Day.

    First time voters are required to show some form of ID, but it does not need to be a photo ID. Acceptable forms of ID are:

    • Pennsylvania driver's license or PENNDOT ID card
    • ID issued by any Commonwealth agency
    • ID issued by the US Government
    • US Passport
    • US armed Forces ID
    • Student ID
    • Employee ID
    • Confirmation issued by the County Voter Registration Office
    • Non-photo ID issued by the Commonwealth that shows name and address
    • Non-photo ID issued by the US Government that shows name and address
    • Firearm permit
    • Current utility bill that shows name and address
    • Current bank statement that shows name and address
    • Current paycheck that shows name and address
    • Government check that shows name and address

    All voters may be asked to show ID at the polls, however, you cannot be stopped from voting a regular ballot if you do not provide a valid ID.

     

    Rhode Island

    Voters must show a photo ID at the polls. Acceptable IDs include:

    • RI driver's license
    • U.S. passport
    • ID card issued by an educational institution in the United States
    • U.S. military identification card
    • ID card issued by the U.S. government or State of Rhode Island like a RIPTA bus pass
    • Government-issued medical card
    • RI Voter ID

    Registered voters who don't have an acceptable current and valid photo ID can get a free Voter ID the Secretary of State office in Providence during normal business hours. To find more information on where to get a free Voter ID and for information on how to get a Voter ID visit the Secretary of State website

    No eligible voter will be turned away at the polls. Voters who do not bring an acceptable ID to their polling place can vote using a standard Provisional Ballot. The ballot will be counted if the signature they give at the polling place matches the signature on their voter registration.

    South Carolina

    You will be asked to show one of the following Photo IDs on Election Day:

    • South Carolina Driver's License
    • ID Card Issued by South Carolina Department of Motor Vehicles
    • South Carolina Voter Registration Card with Photo
    • Federal Military ID
    • U.S. Passport

    If you do not have one of the above photo IDs, you can get one for free by:

    • Registered voters can get a voter registration card with a photo from their county voter registration and elections office by providing their date of birth and the last four digits of their Social Security number.
    • Get a DMV ID card at a local DMV office. To see what documentation is required click here.

    If you do not have a photo ID on Election Day you may be able to vote a provisional ballot after showing your non-photo voter registration card. You must have a reasonable impediment to obtaining a photo ID in order to vote the provisional ballot. Reasonable impediments include:

    • Religious objection to being photographed
    • Disability or illness
    • Work schedule
    • Lack of transportation
    • Lack of birth certificate
    • Family responsibilities
    • Any other obstacle you find reasonable

    To vote under the reasonable impediment exception:

    • Present your current, non-photo registration card at the polling place
    • Sign an affidavit stating why you cannot obtain a photo ID
    • Cast a provisional ballot that will be counted unless the county election commission has reason to believe your affidavit is false.

    If you do not have a photo ID and do not have a reasonable impediment to obtaining one, or you forgot to bring it with you to the polls, you may still vote a provisional ballot. However, for your vote to be counted you must provide one of the photo IDs to the county election commission prior to certification of the election (usually the Thursday or Friday after the election).

    South Dakota

    You must show one of the following forms of ID at the polls when you go to vote:

    • A South Dakota driver's license or non-driver ID card
    • A passport or an identification card, including a picture, issued by an agency of the U.S. government
    • A tribal identification card, including a picture
    • US Government photo ID
    • US Armed Forces ID
    • Student photo ID from a South Dakota high school
    • A current ID that includes a picture, issued by an accredited institution of higher education, including a university, college, or technical school, located within South Dakota

    If you do not have a photo ID, you can sign a personal ID affidavit.

    Tennessee

    A photo ID is required when you vote. All voters must present an ID containing the voter's name and photograph when voting at the polls, whether voting early or on Election Day. Any of the following IDs may be used, even if expired:

    • Tennessee drivers license with your photo
    • United States Passport
    • Photo ID issued by the Tennessee Department of Safety and Homeland Security
    • Photo ID issued by the federal or Tennessee state government
    • United States Military photo ID
    • State-issued handgun carry permit with your photo

    IDs that are not acceptable:

    • College student IDs and photo IDs not issued by the federal or Tennessee state government

    Who is exempt?

    • Voters who vote absentee by mail
    • Voters who are residents of a licensed nursing home or assissted living center and who vote at the facility
    • Voters who are hospitalized
    • Voters with a religious objection to being photographed
    • Voters who are indigent and unable to obtain a photo ID without paying a fee

    If you do not have a photo ID you may obtain a free photo ID from the Department of Safety and Homeland Security at a driver service center. You will need proof of citizenship (such as a birth certificate), two proofs of Tenessee residency (such as a voter registration card, utility bill, vehicle registration/title, or bank statement), and if your name differs from that on your primary ID, proof of the changed name (such as a certified marriage certificate, divorce decree, certified court order, etc.). If you do not have a photo on your driver's license and no other form of valid photo ID, you may visit a driver service center to have your photo added to your license for free upon request.

    If you do not bring a valid photo ID to the polling place you may vote a provisional ballot. You will then have two business days after Election Day to return to the election commission office to show a valid ID.

    For more information visit the Tennessee Secretary of State website.

    Texas

    New Voter Photo ID Requirements are in effect. You will be required to show one of the following forms of photo identification at the polling location before you will be permitted to cast a vote.

    • Texas driver license issued by the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS)
    • Texas Election Identification Certificate issued by DPS
    • Texas personal identification card issued by DPS
    • Texas concealed handgun license issued by DPS
    • United States military identification card containing the person’s photograph
    • United States citizenship certificate containing the person’s photograph
    • United States passport

    With the exception of the U.S. citizenship certificate, the identification must be current or have expired no more than 60 days before being presented for voter qualification at the polling place.

    Your photo Identification card does not have to have your current address. The new photo ID requirement makes no determination on voter address matching criteria; therefore, there is no address matching requirement.

    Your name on the ID and the name on the registration do not necessarily need to match exactly. As long as the names are substantially similar, the voter will only have to affirm they are the same person who is registered before voting a normal ballot. Similar but non-matching names might be because of the use of nicknames, suffixes and changes of name due to marriage or divorce.

    If you are not exempt (addressed below) and you do not have any of the above valid photo IDs, you may cast a provisional ballot at the polls. In order for the provisional ballot to count, you must visit the voter registrar's office within six calendar days of the election to either present one of the above forms of ID or submit one of the temporary affidavits (addressed below) in the presence of the county voter registrar while attesting to the fact that you do not have any of the required photo IDs.

    Exemption/Exceptions:

    Voters with a disability may apply with the county voter registrar for a permanent exemption. The application must contain written documentation from either the U.S. Social Security Administration evidencing you have been determined to have a disability, or from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs evidencing a disability rating of at least 50 percent. In addition, you must state that you have no valid form of photo identification. Those who obtain a disability exemption will be allowed to vote by presenting a voter registration certificate reflecting the exemption. Please contact your voter registrar for more details.

    Voters who have a consistent religious objection to being photographed and voters who do not have any valid form of photo identification as a result of certain natural disasters as declared by the President of the United States or the Texas Governor, may vote a provisional ballot, appear at the voter registrar’s office within six (6) calendar days after election day, and sign an affidavit swearing to the religious objection or natural disaster, in order for your ballot to be counted. Please contact your county voter registrar for more details.

    If you vote by mail you do not need a photo Identification. The new requirement does not change the process for voting by mail. However, only specific reasons entitle a registered voter to vote early by mail (no longer called absentee voting). You may request a ballot by mail if you:

    • will be away from your county on Election Day and during early voting;
    • are sick or disabled;
    • are 65 years of age or older on Election Day; or
    • are confined in jail.

    You can get a formal application for a ballot by mail from:

    The Secretary of State’s office

    The Early Voting Clerk in your county; or

    Download an application for a ballot by mail here.

    For more details please go to the Texas Secretary of State voting site

    Utah

    In order to vote in Utah you need a valid voter ID. This is either a form of ID that has your name and photo or two forms of ID that have your name and proof of residence. Accepted forms of ID include:

    • A current, valid Utah driver's license
    • A current, valid ID card issued by the state or a branch, department, or agency of the United States
    • A current, valid Utah permit to carry a concealed weapon
    • A current, valid US passport
    • A valid tribal ID card, whether or not the card includes a photo of the voter

    Or, provide two forms of the following:

    • A current utility bill or copy dated within 90 days before the election
    • A bank or other financial account statement, or a copy
    • A certified birth certificate
    • A valid Social Security card
    • A check issued by the state or federal government or a copy
    • A current, valid Utah hunting or fishing license
    • A paycheck from the voter's employer, or a copy
    • A current, valid US military ID card
    • Certified naturalization documents (not a green card)
    • A certified copy of court records showing the voter's adoption or name change
    • A bureau of Indian Affairs card
    • A tribal treaty card
    • A valid Medicaid or Medicare or Electronic Benefits Transfer card
    • A current, valid ID card issued by a local government within the state
    • A current, valid ID card issued by an employer
    • A current, valid ID card issued by a college, university, technical school or professional school within the state
    • A current Utah vehicle registration
    Vermont

    First-time voters that registered by mail and did not provide verification are required to show identification at the polls.

    Virginia

    As of July 1, 2014 voters must show one of the following forms of photo ID at the polls:

    • Virginia Driver's License or other photo ID issued by Virginia
    • US Passport
    • Any photo ID issued by the US Government
    • Student ID that has a photograph and that was issued by any institution of higher learning in Virginia
    • Employee ID card that has a photograph and that was issued by the employer in the ordinary course of business

    Please note:

    • Your address on your photo ID does not have to match the address on your voter registration
    • You can use and ID that does not have an expiration date, but if your ID does have an expiration date, it cannot be used if it expired more than 12 months before the election
    • Your name on the ID must match your name on the voter registration rolls. If your name has changed, you can get a free photo ID from the state with your new name. You can check to see if your name matches by cheking your state resource.

    If you do not have a photo ID you can get a free voter identification card from any county registrar, whichever is most convenient for you. You will need to fill out the Voter Photo Identification Applicaltion, get your photo taken and give the registrar your electronic signature. Your photo ID card will be mailed within 7-10 days.

    If you apply for a photo ID card less than 21 days before the next election, you will receive a temporary ID in the registrar's office that is valid for 30 days. You will still receive your permanent ID through the mail. 

    Washington

    ID is only required if you use an audiovisual unit at a voting center. Acceptable forms of ID for voting include:

    • Photo ID, such as a driver's license, state ID card, student ID card, or tribal ID card
    • Voter registration card
    • Utility Bill
    • Bank statement
    • Paycheck
    • Government check
    • Other government document

    A voter who does not have ID may vote a provisional ballot.

    West Virginia

    If you registered by mail, you will have to take a current and valid photo ID or a copy of a current document with your updated name and address the first time you vote.

    Wisconsin

    No ID is required to vote.

    Wyoming

    No form of identification (including a registration card,) needs to be shown at the polls when voting. You are only required to show identification when registering to vote.

    Wyoming allows qualified voters to register at the polls on Election Day by bringing an acceptable form of ID to the polls:

    • Wyoming driver's license
    • A different state's driver's license
    • An ID card issued by a local, state or federal agency
    • A U.S. passport
    • School ID
    • Military ID

    You can also show two of the following in any combination:

    • Certification of U.S. citizenship
    • Certificate of naturalization
    • Draft record
    • Voter registration card from another state or county
    • Original or certified copy of a birth certificate bearing an official seal
    • Certification of birth abroad issued by the department of state
    • Any other form of identification issued by an official agency

    Polling Place Hours

    Alabama

    Alabama polling places are open from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm.

    Alaska

    The polling place hours are from 7:00 am to 8:00 pm for Primary, General and Statewide Special Elections and 8:00am to 8:00am for Regional Educational Attendance Area (REAA) elections.

    Arizona

    Polling place hours are from 6:00 am to 7:00 pm.

    Arkansas

    The polls will be open from 7:30 am to 7:30 pm on Election Day. When the polls close, if you are in line, you will be permitted to vote.

    California

    The polls will be open from 7:00 am to 8:00 pm.

    Colorado

    The polling place will be open from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm.

    Connecticut

    Polling places will be open from 6:00 am to 8:00 pm on Election Day.

    Delaware

    Polling place hours are 7:00 am to 8:00 pm. If you are in line waiting to vote at closing time, you may cast your vote even if it is done after 8:00 pm.

    District of Columbia

    The polls will be open from 7:00 am to 8:00 pm.

    Florida

    The polling place hours will be from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm.

    Georgia

    Polls are open from 7:00 am until 7:00 pm on Election Day. Any voter who is waiting in line to vote at 7:00 pm will be allowed to vote. Peak voting hours are historically from 7:00 am until 9:30 am, 4:30 pm until 7:00 pm, and during the mid-day lunch hour.

    Hawaii

    The polls will be open from 7:00 am to 6:00 pm.

    Idaho

    Polls will be open from 8:00 am to 8:00 pm on Election Day.

    Illinois

    The polls are open from 6:00 am to 7:00 pm.

    Indiana

    Polling places are open from 6:00 am to 6:00 pm on Election Day.

    Iowa

    Polls are open from 7:00 am to 9:00 pm.

    Kansas

    Polling places are open from 7:00am to 7:00pm. All voters who are in line when the polls close are allowed to vote.

    Kentucky

    Polls will be open from 6:00 am to 6:00 pm. All those in line by 6:00 pm will be able to vote.

    Louisiana

    Polls will be open from 6:00 am to 8:00 pm.

    Maine

    All polls open between 6am and 10pm depending on the population of the town. Local officials can give you the exact opening time for your community. All voting places close at 8pm on election day.

    Maryland

    The polling place hours of operation are from 7:00 am to 8:00 pm.

    Massachusetts

    For all elections, except local elections, the polls must be open from 7:00 am to 8:00 pm. Some polling places may open earlier than 7:00 am. If you are in line at the polls by 8:00 pm, you are entitled to vote. For the polling hours in a local election please contact your local election officials.

    Michigan

    Polling places will be open from 7:00 am to 8:00 pm on Election Day.

    Minnesota

    Most polling places are open from 7:00 am to 8:00 pm. Please contact your county auditor or township clerk for details.

    Mississippi

    Polls will be open from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm.

    Missouri

    The polls will be open from 6:00 am to 7:00 pm.

    Montana

    Poll hours of operation vary. Polling places open between 7:00 am and 12:00 pm and close at 8:00 pm. Contact your local elections official for exact times.

    Nebraska

    Polling locations will be open from 8:00 am to 8:00 pm central time and 7:00 am to 7:00 pm mountain time.

    Nevada

    Polling place hours of operation are from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm.

    New Hampshire

    The polling place hours of operation vary in New Hampshire. In general, polling places open between 6:00 am and 11:00 am and close at 7:00 pm. Contact your local election officials for hours in your community.

    New Jersey

    Polls are open from 6:00 am to 8:00 pm.

    New Mexico

    Polls will be open from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm on Election Day.

    New York

    The polling place will be open from 6:00 am to 9:00 pm.

    North Carolina

    The polling place will be open from 6:30 am to 7:30 pm.

    North Dakota

    Most polls are open 7am- 7pm. Some polls may open earlier or close later. It is best to check with your local county election officials before Election Day.

    Ohio

    The polls will be open from 6:30 am - 7:30 pm.

    Oklahoma

    Polls will be open from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm.

    Oregon

    You can still vote in person in Oregon. Each County Elections Office provides privacy booths for voters who want to vote in person or voters who need assistance.

    All ballots must be returned to a County Elections Office or designated drop site by 8pm on Election Day.

    Pennsylvania

    The polling place will be open from 7:00 am to 8:00 pm.

    Rhode Island

    Most places will be open from 7:00 am to 8:00 pm. Opening hours may vary, but all polls close at 8:00 pm.

    South Carolina

    The polls will be open from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm.

    South Dakota

    Polls will be open from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm. Any voter at the polling place prior to 7:00 pm is allowed to cast a ballot.

    Tennessee

    Each county sets their own polling place hours. Contact your local elections commission to find out the times for your community.

    Texas

    On election day the polling place will be open from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm.

    Utah

    Polls will be open from 7:00 am to 8 pm.

    Vermont

    All polls are open from 10am to 7pm. Most polls open earlier.

    Virginia

    Polls are open from 6:00 am to 7:00 pm.

    Washington

    Washington is a mail in ballot state and does not have polling places. Your county election officials can provide information about voting centers/election offices.

    West Virginia

    The polling place will be open from 6:30 am to 7:30 pm.

    Wisconsin

    The polls will be open 7:00 am to 8:00 pm.

    Wyoming

    Polling place hours of operation are from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm.

    Time Off To Vote

    Alabama

    Time off to vote is available for those whose work hours exceed polling place hours. If not, employers are not required to give time off to vote. The necessary time off shall not exceed one hour. Whether this time is paid varies by town.

    Alaska

    Employers must allow sufficient paid time off to vote for their employees, unless the employer has at least two consecutive hours to vote before or after his/her work hours.

    Arizona

    Employors are required to grant three hours of paid leave to vote, unless polls are open three hours before or after work shift.

    Arkansas

    Employer shall schedule sufficient time on election days so that employees may vote. This time varies by location.

    California

    California law states that private and public employers must give employees time off to vote, unless the employee has two hours of nonworking time available to vote or employee fails to vote. Employees must give proper notice to their employer.

    Colorado

    Employers must grant employees two hours of paid leave to vote, unless polls are open three hours before or after regular working shift.

    Connecticut

    Time off to vote is subject to the employer. Connecticut law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

    Delaware

    Time off to vote is subject to the employer. Delaware law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

    District of Columbia

    Time off to vote is subject to the employer. District of Columbia law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

    Florida

    Time off to vote is subject to the employer. Florida state law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

    Georgia

    Employers must grant employees two hours of paid leave to vote, unless polls are open 2 hours before or after regular working shift. This time may be paid depending on location.

    Hawaii

    Employers must grant employees two hours to vote, unless polls are open 2 consecutive hours before or after regular working shift. This time is paid, with proof that the vote has been cast.

    Idaho

    Time off to vote is subject to the employer. Idaho law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

    Illinois

    Every employee is entitled, after giving notice, to two hours off work, provided that the employee's working hours begin less than 2 hours after the opening of the polls and end less than 2 hours before the closing of the polls. The law does not specify whether time off is paid.

    Indiana

    Time off to vote is subject to the employer. Indiana state law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

    Iowa

    Employers must grant employees three hours of paid leave to vote, unless polls are open three consecutive hours before or after regular working shift.

    Kansas

    Any registered voter may leave work for a period of up to two hours to vote. If the polls are open before or after the work shift, the voter may only take such time off that, when added to the amount of time before or after work that the polls are open, it does not exceed two hours.

    Kentucky

    Employers must allow employees up to 2 hours paid leave to vote during their regular work shift. This time is unpaid unless specified otherwise by the employer.

    Louisiana

    Time off to vote is subject to the employer. Louisiana state law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

    Maine

    Time off to vote is subject to the employer. Maine state law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

    Maryland

    Employers must grant employees up to two hours of paid leave to vote, unless polls are open 2 hours before or after regular working shift, or if employee has sufficient time to vote on his/her own. Employees must provide proof that they cast their vote to receive compensation for time off.

    Massachusetts

    Voters employed in mechanical, manufacturing or mercantile businesses are allowed time off during the first two hours after the polls have opened only if an application for absence has been submitted.

    Michigan

    Time off to vote is subject to the employer. Michigan law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

    Minnesota

    Employees are allowed to take time off to vote during the mornings of election days. This time off should be treated as paid leave.

    Mississippi

    Time off to vote is subject to the employer. Mississippi law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

    Missouri

    Employers must grant employees up to three hours paid leave to vote, unless polls are open three consecutive hours before or after regular working shift. Employees must request this time prior to Election Day, and the employer may specify when during the working day employees may take time off.

    Montana

    Time off to vote is subject to the employer. Montana state law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

    Nebraska

    Employers must grant employees from one to two hours paid leave to vote, unless polls are open two consecutive hours before or after regular working shift. Employees must request this time prior to Election Day, and the employer may specify when during the working day employees may take time off.

    Nevada

    Employers must grant employees up to three hours paid leave to vote, unless polls are open three consecutive hours before or after regular working shift. Employees must request this time prior to Election Day, and the employer may specify when during the working day employees may take time off.

    New Hampshire

    Time off to vote is subject to the employer. New Hampshire state law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

    New Jersey

    Time off to vote is subject to the employer. New Jersey state law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

    New Mexico

    Employers must grant employees up to two hours paid leave to vote, unless polls are open two consecutive hours before or three hours after regular working shift. The employer may designate the hours to be taken, but it may not include lunch or rest hours.

    New York

    Employers must grant employees sufficient time to vote, unless polls are open 4 hours before or after regular working shift. Employers may designate whether the time is to be taken at the beginning or end of the shift. Employees must notify employers of the need for time off not more than 10 days and not less than 2 days before the election. Employers must post a conspicuous notice of employee rights at least ten days before Election Day.

    North Carolina

    Time off to vote is subject to the employer. North Carolina state law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

    North Dakota

    The law encourages employers to provide time off to vote when an employee's regular work schedule conflicts with the times polls are open. This policy however is voluntary.

    Ohio

    Employers are prohibited from firing an employee who takes a reasonable amount of time to vote. Salaried employees should be elegible for paid time off to vote. Specifications of time vary by employer.

    Oklahoma

    Employees who begin their work less than 3 hours after the polls open and finish less than 3 hours before the polls close are entitled to 2 hours leave to vote. You must give notice the day before the election and must provide proof of voting to not have your pay reduced. The employer can set the time the employee can leave to vote.

    Pennsylvania

    Time off to vote is subject to the employer. Pennsylvania state law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

    Rhode Island

    Time off to vote is subject to the employer. Rhode Island law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

    South Carolina

    Time off to vote is subject to the employer. South Carolina state law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

    South Dakota

    Employees are entitled to paid leave on Election Day between the time the polls open and when they close, unless the person has two consecutive hours during the time the polls are open in which he or she can vote before or after work.

    Tennessee

    Employers must grant employees up to three hours paid leave to vote, unless polls are open three hours before or after regular working shift. Employees must request this time by noon the day before Election Day, and the employer may specify when during the working day employees may take time off.

    Texas

    Employers must grant employees paid leave to vote on Election Day, unless polls are open two hours before or after regular working shift.

    Utah

    Employers must grant employees up to two hours of paid leave to vote, unless polls are open three outside of regular working shift. The employer may specify the hours during which the employee may be absent.

    Vermont

    Time off to vote is subject to the employer. Vermont state law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

    Virginia

    Time off to vote is subject to the employer. Virginia state law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

    West Virginia

    West Virginia law states that private and public employers must give employees time off to vote, unless the employee has 3 hours nonworking time available to vote or the employee fails to vote.

    Wisconsin

    Employers must grant employees up to three successive hours to vote on Election Day while the polls are open. The employee must notify the employer of his/her intended absence. The employer may designate the time of day for the absence.

    Wyoming

    Employers must grant employees up to one hour of paid time off to vote during polling place hours, if the employee does not have 3 consecutive hours either before or after work that the polls are open.

    Polling Place Locator

    Alabama

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    The board of registrars sends a certificate of registration to you that includes the address of your polling place. If you do not receive your certificate, or if you have further questions regarding your polling place location, please contact your local elections official.

    Alaska

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource. If you have further questions regarding your polling place location, please contact your local elections official.

    Arizona

    You can confirm your voting location by selecting from the following local resources: Arizona State Poll Locator Tool.

    If you have any further questios about your polling place please contact your County Clerk.

    Arkansas

    You can confirm your voting location by selecting from the following local resources: Arkansas State Poll Locator Tool.If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    California

    You can find your polling place by utilizing VOTE411's poll locator tool.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your local elections official.

    Colorado

    Colorado is a vote by mail state. If you have any questions please contact your local elections board.

    Connecticut

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource. If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Delaware

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    District of Columbia

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource. Registered voters can cast their ballot at 143 voting precincts within the District.

    Florida

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource. If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Georgia

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource. If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Hawaii

    You can find your polling place by utilizing VOTE411's poll locator tool or through your state's resource.

    You will be notified of your polling place with the Notice of Voter Registration and Address Confirmation (NVRAC) card which your county clerk will mail to you. The notice will state your voting precinct and polling place during the election and will confirm that you are properly registered to vote in the district and precinct where you live. A Notice of Voter Registration and Address Confirmation is sent to all registered voters at their residence address every election year. A Notice of Voter Registration and Address Confirmation is also sent after each reappointment and redistricting.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Idaho

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Illinois

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Indiana

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Iowa

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Kansas

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Kentucky

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Louisiana

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Maine

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Maryland

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your local board of elections.

    Massachusetts

    If you have questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Michigan

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Minnesota

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Mississippi

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Missouri

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Montana

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Nebraska

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Nevada

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource. If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    New Hampshire

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    New Jersey

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    New Mexico

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    New York

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your local board of elections.

     

    North Carolina

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource. If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    North Dakota

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Ohio

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource. If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Oklahoma

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Oregon

    Oregon is a vote by mail state. You can find you ballot drop box location by utilizing Oregon State's ballot drop off directory.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your County Elections Office .

    Pennsylvania

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Rhode Island

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

     

    South Carolina

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    South Dakota

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Tennessee

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state's tool.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

     

    Texas

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Utah

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Vermont

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Virginia

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your local election office.

    West Virginia

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Wisconsin

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Wyoming

    You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

    If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

    Voting Machines

    Alabama

    The voting system used in Alabama is optical scan.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Alaska

    The voting systems used in Alaska are optical scan, touch screen-paper ballots and hand count.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Touch Screen-Paper ballots: These units used in Alaska have a voter verifiable paper trail that allows the voter to verify the printed version of the ballot prior to casting the ballot. When voting on a touch screen, the voter has the option of having the ballot on the screen and/or listen to an audio version of the ballot and using a keypad to make the selection. Like the optical scan, when the polls close, the election board ends the election on the touch screen and then transmit results either via telephone line (for optical scan precincts) or by calling in the results to the regional office (for hand-count precincts).

    Hand Count: These precincts are those precincts that are in rural areas of the state with fewvoters. After the polls close, the election boards tally the ballots using prepared tally books and then call in the results to the appropriate regional office. The regional offices then data enter the results into the regional GEMS computer and uploads the results to the GEMS system in the Director's Office via modem connection. There are 133 hand-count precincts in Alaska.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Arizona

    The voting systems used in Arizona are optical scan and DRE.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Arkansas

    The voting systems used in Arkansas are optical scan and DRE.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    iVotronic Touch Screen: With system the voter uses a touch screen to place their votes. This system prevents voters from casting two votes in a single race and alerts the voter of races with no votes cast. It includes a paper receipt that remains in the machine but allows voters to see their individual votes to verify the machine records them correctly.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    California

    The voting machine systems used in California are optical scan and DRE.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Colorado

    The voting machine systems used in Colorado are optical scan, DRE and hand-counted paper ballots.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. Some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    Paper Ballots: Paper ballots are one of the oldest ways of voting in America. They are still used in a few places on Election Day. When you come to the polling place, you will get a paper ballot from the poll worker. You take it to the voting booth, and use a pen or pencil to mark a box next to your candidate and issue choices. You then drop the marked ballot into a sealed ballot box.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Connecticut

    The voting systems used in Connecticut are the optical scan and DRE.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil, fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. In some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device which checks your card or paper on site to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen, such as a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because many companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card which you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one screen. Often, with these big screen devices, you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. Some have a keyboard, so that you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    Vote by phone: This option is available at every polling place for voters with disabilities or for any voter who prefers this option.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Delaware

    The voting system used in Delaware is DRE.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. Some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC).

    District of Columbia

    The voting systems used in D.C. are optical scan and DRE.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. Some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Florida

    The voting systems used in Florida are optical scan and DRE.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a pages. where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. Some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC).

    Georgia

    The voting system used in Georgia is DRE.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. Some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Hawaii

    The voting machine systems used in Hawaii are optical scan and DRE.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Idaho

    The voting systems used in Idaho are optical scan and hand-counted paper ballots. Hand-counted paper ballots are used only for elections in sparsely populated jurisdictions, particularly when all offices will be filled by write in votes.

    Optical Scanning: With this system, you will recieve a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. In some places, you can check your card or paper right there at the polling place by feeding it into a card-reading machine to make sure you have voted the way you want to. When you are finished filling out all the cards. You may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that counts the votes. When Election Day is over, the computer counts how many votes were cast for each candidate.

    Paper Ballots: Paper ballots are one of the oldest ways of voting in America. They are still used on Election Day. Paper ballots are mostly used for absentee ballots. When you come to the polling place, you will get a paper ballot from the poll worker. You take it to the voting booth, and use a pen or pencil to mark a box next to your candidate and issue choices. You then drop the marked ballot into a sealed ballot box. At the end of the day, votes are counted by poll workers reading the ballots.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Illinois

    The voting systems used in Illinois are optical scan and DRE.

    To find out what voting machine is used in your county, please visit your state's resource.

    p>Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

     

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. Some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Indiana

    The voting machine systems used in Indiana are optical scan and DRE.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. Some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Iowa

    The voting systems used in Iowa are optical scan and Hand counted paper ballots.

    Optical Scanning: With this system, you will recieve a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. In some places, you can check your card or paper right there at the polling place by feeding it into a card-reading machine to make sure you have voted the way you want to. When you are finished filling out all the cards. You may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that counts the votes. When Election Day is over, the computer counts how many votes were cast for each candidate.

    Paper Ballots: Paper ballots are one of the oldest ways of voting in America. They are still used on Election Day. Paper ballots are mostly used for absentee ballots. When you come to the polling place, you will get a paper ballot from the poll worker. You take it to the voting booth, and use a pen or pencil to mark a box next to your candidate and issue choices. You then drop the marked ballot into a sealed ballot box. At the end of the day, votes are counted by poll workers reading the ballots.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Kansas

    The voting systems used in Kansas are optical scan, DRE and paper ballots. To find out what system(s) your county uses, click here.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. Some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    Paper Ballots: Paper ballots are one of the oldest ways of voting in America. They are still used in a few places on Election Day. When you come to the polling place, you will get a paper ballot from the poll worker. You take it to the voting booth, and use a pen or pencil to mark a box next to your candidate and issue choices. You then drop the marked ballot into a sealed ballot box.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Kentucky

    The voting systems used in Kentucky are optical scan and DRE.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Louisiana

    The voting system used in Louisiana is DRE.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Maine

    The voting systems used in Maine are optical scan and paper ballots.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Paper Ballots: Paper ballots are one of the oldest ways of voting in America. They are still used in a few places on Election Day. When you come to the polling place, you will get a paper ballot from the poll worker. You take it to the voting booth, and use a pen or pencil to mark a box next to your candidate and issue choices. You then drop the marked ballot into a sealed ballot box.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Maryland

    The voting system used in Maryland is DRE.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Massachusetts

    The voting systems used in Massachusetts are optical scan and hand counted paper ballots.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Paper Ballots: Paper ballots are one of the oldest ways of voting in America. They are still used in a few places on Election Day. When you come to the polling place, you will get a paper ballot from the poll worker. You take it to the voting booth, and use a pen or pencil to mark a box next to your candidate and issue choices. You then drop the marked ballot into a sealed ballot box.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Michigan

    The voting system used in Michigan is optical scan.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Minnesota

    The voting systems used in Minnesota are optical scan and paper ballots.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Paper Ballots: Paper ballots are one of the oldest ways of voting in America. They are still used in a few places on Election Day. When you come to the polling place, you will get a paper ballot from the poll worker. You take it to the voting booth, and use a pen or pencil to mark a box next to your candidate and issue choices. You then drop the marked ballot into a sealed ballot box.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commissions (EAC) resource.

    Mississippi

    The voting systems used in Mississippi are DRE and paper ballots.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    Paper Ballots: Paper ballots are one of the oldest ways of voting in America. They are still used in a few places on Election Day. When you come to the polling place, you will get a paper ballot from the poll worker. You take it to the voting booth, and use a pen or pencil to mark a box next to your candidate and issue choices. You then drop the marked ballot into a sealed ballot box.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Missouri

    The voting systems used in Missouri are optical scan and punch card.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Punchcards: With a punchcard system, when you sign in at the polling place, the poll workers will give you one or more cards. These cards are usually about 8 inches by 3 inches, with small rectangles that can be punched out. You take your cards to a small private table. You'll see a booklet mounted on a frame. The frame will have a place for you to slide your first card in. Make sure that it's in all the way and lined up correctly. If you're not sure, ask one of the poll workers to make sure you've got it right. The table also has a little device (often a metal stylus or stick) that you use to punch holes next to the name of the person or ballot measure you want to vote for. Give it a firm punch, so it pushes out that little cardboard rectangle or chad. You may have to look at the booklet carefully so that you punch the right hole lined up with the person you want to vote for. Often there is a little arrow that helps you find the right hole. Some punchcards have the names of the candidates written right on the cards. You may need to vote on more than one card. Look it over carefully, so you put the right card in the right slot. Some punch card systems use both sides of the card, so look on the back of each card too. Check to see that all the holes are punched all the way through and there are no little pieces of cardboard (chad) hanging from your card. When you are done, pick up all your cards. There may be an envelope to put your cards in. Take your cards over to the ballot box and put the cards into the box.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Montana

    The voting systems used in Montana are optical scan and paper ballot.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Paper Ballots: Paper ballots are one of the oldest ways of voting in America. They are still used in a few places on Election Day. When you come to the polling place, you will get a paper ballot from the poll worker. You take it to the voting booth, and use a pen or pencil to mark a box next to your candidate and issue choices. You then drop the marked ballot into a sealed ballot box.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Nebraska

    The voting systems used in Nebraska are optical scan and DRE.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC)

    Nevada

    The voting system used in Nevada is DRE.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    New Hampshire

    The voting systems used in New Hampshire are optical scan and paper ballots.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Paper Ballots: Paper ballots are one of the oldest ways of voting in America. They are still used in a few places on Election Day. When you come to the polling place, you will get a paper ballot from the poll worker. You take it to the voting booth, and use a pen or pencil to mark a box next to your candidate and issue choices. You then drop the marked ballot into a sealed ballot box.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    New Jersey

    The voting system used in New Jersery is DRE.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    New Mexico

    The voting machine systems used in New Mexico are optical scan.

    New Mexico uses paper ballots that are scanned on an electronic optical scanning system for absentee voting. Counties may also use optical scan systems for early voting. Some counties use optical scan systems for Election Day voting. Other models of electronic voting systems are used for early voting and precinct voting on Election Day. Visit the New Mexico Secretary of State website to find the type of voting systems used in your county.

    If you do not want to vote on an electronic voting machine, you may vote with an absentee ballot, which is a paper ballot. Absentee ballots are counted on an electronic scanning voting system that tabulates ballots.

    If you choose to go to the polls on Election Day, you will not be issued a paper ballot except for the reasons allowed in the Election Code. Emergency paper ballots are issued at the polling place only when a voting system becomes disabled and cannot be repaired in a reasonable length of time and there are no other voting machines available for substitution.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

     

    New York

    The voting machine systems used in New York are optical scan, DRE and lever.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    Mechanical Lever Machines: On mechanical lever voting machines, the name of each candidate or ballot issue choice is assigned a particular lever in a rectangular array of levers on the front of the machine. A set of printed strips visible to the voters identifies the lever assignment for each candidate and issue choice. The levers are horizontal in their unvoted positions.The voter enables the machine with a lever that also closes a privacy curtain. The voter pulls down selected levers to indicate choices. When the voter exits the booth by opening the privacy curtain with the handle, the voted levers are automatically returned to their original horizontal position. As each lever returns, it causes a connected counter wheel within the machine to turn one-tenth of a full rotation. The counter wheel, serving as the ones position of the numerical count for the associated lever, drives a tens counter one-tenth of a rotation for each of its full rotations. The tens counter similarly drives a hundreds counter. If all mechanical connections are fully operational during the voting period, and the counters are initially set to zero, the position of each counter at the close of the polls indicates the number of votes cast on the lever that drives it. Interlocks in the machine prevent the voter from voting for more choices than permitted.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the voting machine summary of the New York State Board of Elections.

    North Carolina

    The voting systems used in North Carolina are optical scan, DRE, and hand-counted paper ballots.

    Optical Scanning: With this system, you will recieve a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. In some places, you can check your card or paper right there at the polling place by feeding it into a card-reading machine to make sure you have voted the way you want to. When you are finished filling out all the cards. You may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that counts the votes. When Election Day is over, the computer counts how many votes were cast for each candidate.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE) : This is the newest kind of system in use in the US. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen, like a TV or computer screen. The poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session. These devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these bigscreen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to votefor (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Some of these machinese have a key pad, and/ or have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for. You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad. The votes are stored on a computer device like a disk or a cartridge. At the end of the day, results from the disk or cartridge can be printed and read at the polling place or transferred to a central location.

    Paper Ballots: Paper ballots are one of the oldest ways of voting in America. They are still used on Election Day. Paper ballots are mostly used for absentee ballots. When you come to the polling place, you will get a paper ballot from the poll worker. You take it to the voting booth, and use a pen or pencil to mark a box next to your candidate and issue choices. You then drop the marked ballot into a sealed ballot box. At the end of the day, votes are counted by poll workers reading the ballots.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) (EAC) resource.

    North Dakota

    The voting systems used in North Dakota are optical scan and DRE.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Ohio

    The voting systems used in Ohio are optical scan and DRE.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Oklahoma

    The voting system used in Oklahoma is optical scan.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commissions (EAC) resource.

    Pennsylvania

    The voting systems used in Pennsylvania are optical scan, DRE, and paper ballots.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    Paper Ballots: Paper ballots are one of the oldest ways of voting in America. They are still used in a few places on Election Day. When you come to the polling place, you will get a paper ballot from the poll worker. You take it to the voting booth, and use a pen or pencil to mark a box next to your candidate and issue choices. You then drop the marked ballot into a sealed ballot box.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Rhode Island

    The voting systems used in Rhode Island are optical scan and DRE.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    South Carolina

    The voting system used in South Carolina is DRE. Optical Scan machines are used for mail-out absentee ballots.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    South Dakota

    The voting systems used in South Dakota are optical scan and paper ballots.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Paper Ballots: Paper ballots are one of the oldest ways of voting in America. They are still used in a few places on Election Day. When you come to the polling place, you will get a paper ballot from the poll worker. You take it to the voting booth, and use a pen or pencil to mark a box next to your candidate and issue choices. You then drop the marked ballot into a sealed ballot box.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC)

    Tennessee

    The voting systems used in Tennessee are optical scan and DRE.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Texas

    The voting systems used in Texas are optical scan, DRE and paper ballots.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    Paper Ballots: Paper ballots are one of the oldest ways of voting in America. They are still used in a few places on Election Day. When you come to the polling place, you will get a paper ballot from the poll worker. You take it to the voting booth, and use a pen or pencil to mark a box next to your candidate and issue choices. You then drop the marked ballot into a sealed ballot box.

    The following vendors are currently certified by the State of Texas:

    • Diebold Electronic Systems, Inc. (Accu-Vote TS)
    • Election Systems and Software, Inc. (AutoMARK 1.0, iVotronic v.8.0.1.0.)
    • Hart Intercivic, Inc. (eSlate v.5.0, v.3.3)

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Utah

    The voting system used in Utah is DRE.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Vermont

    The voting systems used in Vermont are optical scan, paper ballots and vote by phone.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Paper Ballots: Paper ballots are one of the oldest ways of voting in America. They are still used in a few places on Election Day. When you come to the polling place, you will get a paper ballot from the poll worker. You take it to the voting booth, and use a pen or pencil to mark a box next to your candidate and issue choices. You then drop the marked ballot into a sealed ballot box.

    Vote by Phone: The Help America Vote Act (HAVA) required states to implement voting systems that are accessible for individuals with disabilities and permit voters who are blind or visually-impaired to cast their votes privately and independently. The vote-by-phone system purchased by the State of Vermont is designed to meet this mandate. When you go to your polling place and check in at the entrance checklist, indicate that you wish to use the vote-by-phone system. A poll worker uses a designated telephone to call the system, enters the poll worker and ballot access IDs to bring up the appropriate ballot, then gives the phone to you and leaves the voting booth. The system reads the ballot to you and, after you makes ballot selections using the telephone key pad, the system prints out a paper ballot at the office of the secretary of state. The paper ballot is automatically scanned and can be played back to you for verification upon your request. You may decide to cast it or discard it and revote.

    The vote by phone system permits you to practice voting on the system prior to Election Day. You will be able to use any touchtone telephone to call into the system and practice voting to familiarize yourself with the contests and candidates on your ballot. To try out the system and practice voting your ballot, call your local county clerk to get the ballot access 3 digit # for your voting district. Then call (866) 486-3838 to listen and practice voting on the same ballot that you will hear and vote on Election Day. You can call in and practice as many times as you want.

    All phone calls are answered by a computer system located at a secure location controlled by authorized election officials. The computer will only permit access to the system from phone numbers that have been entered into the system prior to the election, and only after the proper poll worker and ballot access ID numbers have been entered. The vote-by-phone system will be pre-tested before every election to ensure accurate programming. The system makes no use of the Internet or any other data network, so the system cannot be hacked. The only system input comes from DTMF tones, the distinct sounds generated by the telephone when its buttons are pressed. The vote-by-phone system produces a voter-verified paper ballot for every vote cast and the process can be monitored by observers.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Virginia

    The voting machine systems used in Virginia are optical scan, DRE, voter assist terminal and paper ballots.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some DRE's used in the U.S. will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    Paper Ballots: Paper ballots are one of the oldest ways of voting in America. They are still used for mail-in absentee ballots and in a few places on Election Day. When you come to the polling place, you will get a paper ballot from the poll worker. You take it to the voting booth, and use a pen or pencil to mark a box next to your candidate and issue choices. You then drop the marked ballot into a sealed ballot box.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource and the voting systems section at www.sbe.virginia.gov.

    Washington

    Washington is a mail in ballot state. The public may observe the processing of mail ballots. You may contact your County Auditor to arrange times to observe. Ballots are tabulated on optical scan and digital scan tabulating equipment. The equipment must be able to determine the ballot format for every ballot. Bar codes on each ballot allow the tabulation equipment to immediately determine the ballot format of that ballot, which allows the equipment to correctly read the ballot. For more information about ballot barcodes and this process please use your state's resource tool.

    West Virginia

    The voting systems used in West Virginia are Optical Scan, AutoMARK, Paper Ballots and DRE.

    Optical Scan: An optical scan ballot is a specially designed paper ballot which is marked by the voter with a special pencil, then tallied by a computer reader. The layout is very similar to the standardized tests given in school, the voter darkens an oval next to a candidate's name in order to enter a vote.

    AutoMARK:This voting system actually uses the Optical Scan ballot. The voter inserts the ballot into the machine and uses the AutoMARK touch screen to make his/her choices; when the voter is finished, the unit then marks the ballot for the voter and the voter retrieves his/her ballot and places it in a ballot box.

    Paper Ballots: Paper Ballots are still marked with an x to select the preferred candidate and then counted at the polling place by a team of five election officials called a Counting Board.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for. You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Wisconsin

    The voting systems used in Wisconsin are optical scan, DRE, mechanical lever machine and paper ballots.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    Paper Ballots: Paper ballots are one of the oldest ways of voting in America. They are still used in a few places on Election Day. When you come to the polling place, you will get a paper ballot from the poll worker. You take it to the voting booth, and use a pen or pencil to mark a box next to your candidate and issue choices. You then drop the marked ballot into a sealed ballot box.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Wyoming

    The voting systems used in Wyoming are optical scan and DRE.

    Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

    Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

    There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

    Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

    You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

    You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

    Provisions for Voters with Disabilities

    Alabama

    Any voter who wishes to have assistance is entitled to help. You may ask anyone (except your employer, an agent of the employer, or an officer or agent of the voter's union) to provide that assistance for you. If you do not request a specific individual, a poll worker may assist you at your request. Polling places should be accessible to people with disabilities. If your specific disability is not accommodated, please contact your county's board of elections.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People with Disabilities resource.

    Alaska

    If you are a qualified voter who is disabled, you may apply for an absentee ballot through a personal representative who can bring the ballot to you. A personal representative can be anyone over 18, except a candidate for office in the election, your employer, an agent of your employer, or an officer or agent of your union. Ballots are available 15 days before the primary, general or statewide special election at any regional elections office.

    The personal representative brings the completed application to an election official for a ballot and takes the ballot to you. You complete a certificate authorizing the personal representative to carry your ballot, vote the ballot privately, place it in a secrecy sleeve and seal it inside the envelope provided. The personal representative brings the voted ballot back to the election official by 8:00 pm on Election Day.

    In addition to bilingual assistance in many polling places, the division of elections has a TTY communication device for the hearing impaired, magnifying ballot viewers at the polling places and audio recordings of the general election official election pamphlet for the visually impaired, and handicapped accessible polling places.

    You may bring someone to help you at the polls. The person you bring may go into the booth with you and assist you with voting. This includes election officials, friends, family members, bystanders, campaign workers and anyone else who is not your employer, an agent of your employer, or officer or agent of your union. If you had planned on going to your polling place on Election Day but become ill or are homebound, you can vote by having a personal representative bring you a ballot. If this is inconvenient, you can apply up to seven days before an election for an absentee ballot to be mailed to you. If your specific type of special services needed are not covered here, please contact an elections office for assistance.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    Arizona

    Citizens with disabilities should contact their local county recorder for information about polling place access, early voting, assistance at the polling place and all other election related procedures.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    Arkansas

    If you are at the polling site and find that you are unable to stand in line for extended period of time due to physical, sensory or other disabilities, you can inform an election official and they will put you at the head of the line of any voters. If you are unable to mark your ballot, you may be assisted by two election officials or by any person selected by you, who will mark the ballot in accordance with your voting wishes. If you are a qualified elector and you tell the election official at the voting precinct that you are unable to read the ballot, the election official have the entire ballot read to you, unless you instruct otherwise. The election official shall then assist you without comment or interpretation in marking the ballot. If you designate a person to assist, the election official shall allow that person to assist you, and the person designated shall read the entire ballot to you, unless you instruct otherwise, and then assist you without comment or interpretation in marking the ballot.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    California

    It is recommended that you contact your county elections official regarding whether or not curbside voting is available at your polling place. If curbside voting is available at your polling place, you may approach as near as possible to the voting area and elections officials may bring you a roster to sign, a ballot to vote, and any other voting materials you may need, whether you are actually at a curb, in a car, or otherwise located outside the polls.

    Both state and federal laws require that all voters, including voters with disabilities, be able to cast their ballots privately and independently. New voting systems have been specifically designed for this purpose. Each polling place should have at least one voting system that permits voters, including those who are blind or visually impaired, to cast a ballot without assistance. In addition, the voting system must permit you to privately and independently verify your vote choices and, if there is an error, permit you to correct those choices before the ballot is cast. To find out what system your county uses, and how to use it, please visit your local board of elections

    Although new accessible voting equipment is required to enable voters with disabilities to cast a ballot privately and independently, if you want help, or if for any reason you are unable to personally mark your ballot, you may choose up to two people to help you cast your vote. However, the persons or person you choose may not be your employer or your employer's agent, or your labor union leader or agent.

    If, for any reason, your name does not appear on the list of voters at a polling place, you have the right to cast a provisional ballot. This is a ballot just like a regular ballot, but it will be placed in a special envelope and will be counted after the elections official confirms that you are eligible to vote. The official at the polling place will give you information about how to find out if your ballot was counted, and, if it was not counted, the reason why.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    Colorado

    Under HAVA, each polling place must contain a voting system that is accessible for individuals with disabilities, including for visually impaired voters, in a manner that provides the same opportunity for accessibility and participation (including privacy and independence) as for other voters.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    Connecticut

    All polling places must be accessible. If you require assistance to vote by reason of blindness, disability, or inability to write or to read the ballot, assistance may be given by a person of your choice. This person may accompany you into the voting booth. This can be a person of your choosing but cannot be:

    • Your employer
    • An agent of such employer
    • An officer or agent of your union

    A disabled person may, at any time, request a paper ballot for electors with disabilities.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    Delaware

    All people qualified and desiring to vote must be given the opportunity to do so. Therefore, there will be accessible polling places, accessible voting machines, the opportunity for voting by absentee ballot and assistance at any point as a means of accommodation.

    If you need help at the polls election officers are ready to assist. You may also bring someone with you to help in the voting process.

    If you are deaf or hard of hearing, all election materials, announcements and forms are available at your state's election website. You may also use the state's free TDD relay service to obtain election and voting information. Simply dial 711 and give the operator the toll free help line number for the county from which you are calling: New Castle County 800-577-000, Kent County 800-464-4357, Sussex County 800-464-4357, Outside Delaware 800-273-9500.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    District of Columbia

    To vote curbside, a poll worker must be told that you need curbside assistance. When a poll worker is notified that you wish to vote curbside, one of the election officials will bring a ballot to you and provide assistance as needed. It is suggested that you call ahead to let the election officials at the polling site know that you wish to vote curbside. Call 202-727-2525 to obtain the polling place telephone number where you will be voting. Persons with a TDD or TTY device may call 202-639-8916.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    Florida

    If you are unable to read or write or, because of a disability, needs assistance in voting, you may designate someone, other than an employer or an officer or agent of your union, to provide such assistance. Election officials may also provide assistance.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    Georgia

    You may receive assistance at the polls if you are unable to read the English language or if you have a physical disability that renders you unable to see or mark the ballot, operate the voting equipment, or enter the voting booth. In order to receive assistance, everyone, except those that are blind, must take an oath stating the reason they need assistance.

    The person providing assistance to you must sign on the oath. When there is a federal candidate on the ballot, you can select anyone you want to assist you in voting, except for your employer, an agent of that employer, or an officer or agent of your union. When there is no federal candidate on the ballot, you can select any other resident of the precinct or a parent, sibling, spouse or child (provided they are not a candidate on the ballot or a relative of a candidate on the ballot) to assist you inside the voting booth. No person may assist more than ten voters in a primary, election, or runoff.

    Note: Between the hours of 9:30 am and 4:30 pm on the day of an election, voters who are 75 years of age or older or who are physically disabled may, upon request to a poll officer, vote immediately without waiting in line.

    If you are physically disabled or illiterate, you may receive assistance from another voter in the same county or municipality or from the same category of relatives who can make an application for or deliver an absentee ballot. If you are outside of the county or municipality, then a notary public can provide such assistance. Any person who assists another person to vote absentee must complete an oath prescribed by law demonstrating the statutory disability and that the ballot was completed as the voter desired.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    Hawaii

    If you are a long stay patient at a care home or a patient unexpectedly admitted to a hospital, you are still eligible to vote. To ensure the security and integrity of election related activities at care facilities, staff members are discouraged from participating directly with a voter in the process of registering and/or voting absentee. Staff may assist only upon receiving specific authorization from the resident (voter). When asked by a voter to render assistance, care facility staff must remain nonpartisan and have at least two people NOT of the same political party present. This will help eliminate the appearance of any election irregularities while assisting a voter. In addition, staff should:

    • Always be mindful of the voting rights of patients as well as their family members
    • Refrain from explicit or implicit discriminatory or coercive voter registration practices, as both are prohibited
    • Not collect completed voter registration forms shall unless specific authorization is provided by the clerk or chief election officer
    • Mail requests for an absentee ballot directly to the local clerk
    • Not copy, duplicate or otherwise make use of any information provided on registration forms. Information provided by the voter on the affidavit for registration is confidential
    • If acting as an intermediary to pick up an absentee ballot, obtain a letter of authorization from the registered voter and submit it to the clerk
    • Ensure that no one asks a voter to see or look at the contents of a voted ballot or choice of party
    • Ensure that no one marks a voter's ballot or directs a voter without authorization
    • Not attempt to vote in the name of the patient without specific authorization, as it is illegal

    If you require assistance to vote by reason of physical, visual, hearing impairment or inability to read or write, you may be given assistance by a person of the your choice, except for your employer, an agent of your employer, or officer or agent of your union.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    Idaho

    You may receive assistance to vote from any person of your choice. You may also ask for assistance from a poll worker. Curbside assistance and home voting is available in special circumstances. Please make arrangements with your county clerk's office in advance. Each polling place in the state will be equipped with a ballot marking device to assist voters who have difficulty reading or marking a ballot vote privately and independently. The ballot marking device is intended to assist the visually impaired, voters with disabilities and the elderly. Other voters will vote as they have in the past using the appropriate ballot for their county. Visually impaired voters can use headphones to listen to an audio ballot and make their selections using a Braille keypad. The ballot marking device has a touch screen with a zoom feature to enlarge the ballot print and a contrast feature to make the ballot easier to read for some voters. The ballot marking device only marks a ballot. No votes are stored in the machine. Votes are counted by the election board of your county. You can review and change your selections before the device marks a paper ballot. If you are using the ballot marking device, you may request a new ballot from a poll worker if you make a mistake. Additional instructions will be available at the polls and poll workers are trained to help if you request their assistance.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    Illinois

    Numerous provisions are available to aid voters with disabilities. If you are a disabled voter you may request the opportunity to register at home and have registration materials brought to you. You may also request to register to vote by mail.If you are permanently physically disabled, in a nursing home or in a hospital, you may also be eligible for absentee voting.

    The Help America Vote Act requires that election authorities have voting equipment in place for voters with disabilities to vote privately and independently, and Illinois is no exception. Additionally, there are options for a seated voting booth, voting assistance from a friend, relative, or two election judges (one from each party), and curbside voting.

    Language assistance is alsoavailable where required under amendments to the Federal Voting Act of 1992.

    For more information on the provisions available for disabled voters, please contact your local election authority.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    Indiana

    The polling place for each precinct must meet accessibility standards under federal law.

    The polling place must have facilities accessible to elderly voters and voters with disabilities so that these voters have the same opportunity for access, participation, privacy, and independence available to all voters. This includes:

    • Parking spaces marked and available for voters with disabilities with blue signage
    • An accessible path to the facility that an individual travels to reach the polls
    • Accessible entrances to the facility
    • The paths of travel within the facility to the space where the voting systems are located
    • The space in the facility where the voting systems are located

    If you believe that the polling place for your precinct does not comply with accessibility requirements, contact your county election board as soon as possible to inform them about this problem. It may be possible for the board to make temporary or permanent changes to the polling place to make it more accessible for all voters.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    Iowa

    If you need help marking your ballot because of a disability or because you can't read English, any person you choose may help you, except your employer, your employer's agent or an officer or agent of your union. If you want help from the precinct workers, one person from each political party will help you. You will need to sign a form indicating that you asked for help. All voting instructions at the polls are printed in large type.

    If you cannot get into the polling place because of a disability, two precinct workers will bring a ballot to your vehicle. They may also help you mark the ballot, but only if you request assistance. You do not have to tell anyone ahead of time that you will need to vote in your car. However, you may want to call ahead or bring someone with you to tell the precinct workers that you need to vote in your car.

    If you have questions or concerns about voting accessibility, please contact your county auditor's office or your Secretary of State's office. A voter guide is also available on audio cassette from the Library for the Blind. To request one you can call 515-281-1333 or 1-800-362-2587. Each precinct also provides a braille version of voter instructions and voter rights.

    For more information, you can utilize the Association of People With Disabilities resource.

    Kansas

    Voters have the right to vote in an accessible voting place and request assistance if needed. Each polling place is required to have an electronic voting machine equipped to allow disabled voters, including visually impaired voters, to vote in secret.

    For more information, you can utilize the Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    Kentucky

    Kentucky is required to have a voting machine in each polling place that allows anyone with a disability to cast a ballot free of outside assistance. Nevertheless, if you need assistance due to physical disability, blindness or an inability to read English, you may request voting assistance at the polls on Election Day. Physical disability and blindness are the only two reasons you may apply to the county board of elections for permanent voting assistance. You may receive assistance from someone of your choice or the two election officers at the polls. You may not be assisted by your employer, the employer's agent, a union officer or agent of your union.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    Louisiana

    Voters who are physically unable to vote in person at the polls on Election Day and unable to vote in person at the registrar's office may be eligible for the special program for physically handicapped voters. Call your parish registrar of voters office and ask for more details to see if you are eligible. Disabled voters may go to the front of the line at their polling place.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    Maine

    If you are visually impaired, physically disabled, or are unable to read or write, you can be assisted.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    Maryland

    Maryland's voting system accommodates voters with disabilities by offering an audio ballot. Using headphones, the voter listens to the ballot and records the vote using a keypad. Both the headphones and keypad are provided. To assure the privacy of the voter, the voting unit's screen is blank while the audio ballot feature is being used. A magnified ballot is provided for voters who have low vision. An adjustable screen is available to accommodate voters who prefer or need to sit while voting. To use one of the accessibility options, ask an election judge for a particular option. A voter will not be required to provide an explanation or fill out additional paperwork. Election judges will be available to answer questions and, if needed, provide assistance. If you need assistance voting, you may select someone to assist you in the voting process. Maryland law prohibits a voter's employer or agent of the employer or an officer or agent of the voter's union from serving as a voter's assistant. An election judge may assist you, but only in the presence of another election judge of a different political party.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    Massachusetts

    Polling places must be accessible to elderly and disabled voters. Federal law required polling places be accessible by 1986. If you are permanently physically disabled and cannot cast your vote at the polling place, you may file a letter from your physician with your city or town clerk, stating that you are permanently unable to cast your vote at the polling place because of physical disability. A completed application for an absentee ballot for you to sign and return will be mailed to you by the city or town clerk at least 28 days before every primary and general election.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    Michigan

    Any action or physical barrier that prevents voters with disabilities from casting a ballot is unacceptable. To ensure that proper accessibility is maintained, federal and state laws require polling places to remove or make accommodations for any barriers that prevent voters with disabilities from voting.

    Care should be taken to ensure that the polling place is accessible: doors should not be blocked, alternatives to stairs such as ramps or elevators should be available, and lighting and seating should be adequate. Furthermore, at least one voting station should be adapted to allow a person to vote while seated.

    If you require assistance in casting a ballot, you may choose a person to help you provided that the person is not your employer, an agent of your employer, or an officer or agent of your union.

    If you or someone you know requires special access to the polls, it's important to call the clerk's office ahead of time to make sure your voting site is free of obstructions. If your precinct is not accessible, you will be directed to an alternative site that is accessible. For more information, contact your local clerk. Hearing impaired residents with questions may contact the Department of State's Bureau of Elections by TTY at (517) 322-1477.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    Minnesota

    If you need help with voting, you can ask the election judges at the polling place for assistance in reading or marking the ballot. You may also bring someone to help you. All polling places should be fully accessible with clearly marked accessible doors and parking spaces. If you cannot easily leave your car, you can ask for the ballot to be brought out to you. If you are unable to go to the polling place due to an illness or disability, you can vote by absentee ballot. If you have limited vision, you may ask for voter registration and absentee ballot instructions in an alternative format. If you are hearing impaired, every county and most cities will have a TDD device for questions. Materials can be provided in braille, on audio tape, on CD or in large print. To order any brochures or to order a voter registration application and instructions on how to fill it out, contact the secretary of state's elections division at 651-215-1440 or toll free, at 1-877-600-8683. TTY: 1-800-627-3529.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    Mississippi

    If you are permanently disabled, you can register to be on the voter disabled list and will automatically be sent a ballot. To register as a disabled citizen, you must get a signed statement from your physician stating you are permanently disabled. The new voting machines provide accessible voting for many disabled. If necessary, you can choose a person to assist you with your voting.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    Missouri

    You may bring anyone you choose to assist you with voting if you cannot read or write, are blind or have some other physical disability and cannot vote your ballot. If you require assistance and do not bring a person to assist you, you are entitled to receive assistance from an election judge. You must request assistance, and upon your request, two election judges from different political parties will assist you. Depending on the number of judges present and voter turnout, there may be a wait for an election judge to assist you.

    If you have a question regarding a specific required assistance, please contact your local election authority to determine what assistance is available at your polling place.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    Montana

    If you have a physical disability or are unable to read or write, you may ask an election judge to help you mark your ballot for you. With the permission of the election judge, a friend or relative can go into the voting booth with you and help you vote. Every polling place in Montana will be required to have at least one specialized voting machine enabling people with disabilities to vote independently.If you would like to designate an agent to assist you with the voting process, contact your local elections office to ask for an application for the designation of an agent.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    Nebraska

    If you cannot read, are blind or have a physical disability, you may request assistance in marking your ballot. You may have a friend or relative assist you, or you may request the assistance of two election board workers, each from a different party.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    Nevada

    Each voter has the right to request assistance in voting if necessary. For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    New Hampshire

    All polling places have accessible equipment for voting. The vast majority of polling places are handicapped accessible. For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    New Jersey

    Most polling places in New Jersey are accessible to voters with disabilities. You may call your county board of elections to determine if your polling location will be able to meet your specific needs. However, if you are permanently disabled, unable to go to the polls to vote, or wish to receive information on an absentee ballot, you may check a box in the lower left hand corner of the voter registration form and information will be forwarded to you. For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    New Mexico

    You may request assistance in voting at the polls if you are blind, physically disabled, unable to read or write or a member of a language minority. Any person of your choice may assist you, except your employer, an agent of the employer, an officer or agent of your union, or a candidate whose name is on the ballot.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    New York

    Most polling places are now accessible to the handicapped. If yours is not, you may ask to have your records transferred to a nearby accessible polling place where the ballot will be the same as in your election district. You may also vote by absentee ballot. If you have a long-term or permanent illness or disability, you can apply for a permanent absentee ballot and you will automatically receive one before each primary and general election. For additional information, please visit your state's Board of Election.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    North Carolina

    Voting assistance, curbside voting, and reassignment of polling place are offered to disabled voters.

    REASSIGNMENT OF POLLING PLACE

    If a disabled voter does not wish to vote curbside, and the polling place is not sufficiently equipped to allow comfortable or adequate entrance to the building, there is another option. Satellite voting places: A county board of elections may, upon approval of a request submitted in writing to the State Board of Elections, establish a plan whereby elderly or disabled voters in a precinct may vote at designated sites within the precinct other than the regular voting place for that precinct. The State Board of Elections shall approve a county board's proposed plan if:

    1. All the satellite voting places to be used are listed in the county's written request; 

    2. The plan will in the State Board's judgment overcome a barrier to voting by the elderly or disabled persons;

    3. Adequate security against fraud is provided for; and

    4. The plan does not unfairly favor or disfavor voters with regard to race or party affiliation.

    CURBSIDE VOTING

    Aged and disabled persons allowed to vote outside voting enclosure. In any primary or election any qualified voter who is able to travel to the voting place, but because of age, or physical disability and physical barriers encountered at the voting place is unable to enter the voting place or enclosure to vote in person without physical assistance, shall be allowed to vote either in the vehicle conveying such person to the voting place or in the immediate proximity of the voting place.

    VOTING ASSISTANCE

    Assistance to voters in primaries and general elections. In a primary or general election, a registered voter qualified to vote in the primary or general election shall be entitled to assistance in getting to and from the voting booth and in preparing his ballots in accordance with the following rules:

    1. Any voter shall be entitled to assistance from a near relative of his [her] choice.

    2. Any voter in any of the following four categories shall be entitled to assistance from a person of the voter's choice, other than the voter's employer or agent of that employer or officer or agent of the voter's union:

    -One who, on account of physical disability, is unable to enter the voting booth without assistance;

    -One who, on account of physical disability, is unable to mark his ballots without assistance;

    -One who, on account of illiteracy, is unable to mark his ballots without assistance;

    -One who, on account of blindness, is unable to enter the voting booth or mark his ballots without assistance.

    Please visit your state's resource for additional information. You can also utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    North Dakota

    If you are a disabled voter you may be accompanied by, and receive assistance from, another person of your choice in the voting booth, unless the person is an employer, officer or agent of your union, a candidate running in that election, or a relative of a candidate. The polling place building should have several routes through it, and sufficient signs should be in place to direct you to the most accessible route to the polling location.

    For more information you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    Ohio

    Ohio polling places should provide touch screen voting machines and have audio adaptations for assisting the blind. There are also adaptations for voters with lack of muscle control. If you have a disability you may also have assistance by two election officials (of different political parties) or by the person of your choice (except employer or union agent). Poll workers are urged to accommodate voters with disabilities in any way they can. If the polling place is not accessible for you, when possible you may vote curbside. In these cases, two poll workers will take a voting device to the you.

    For more information, contact the Secretary of State's ADA Coordinator, Brett Harbage at 614-387-6039 or by email at bharbage@sos.state.oh.us. You can also contact the Ohio Legal Rights Service at 800-282-918, or the the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) at 800-840-8844. Sue Hetrick from the Ohio Disability Vote Coalition can be reached at 866-575-8055, and can also provide assistance to disabled voters.

     

    Oklahoma

    If you have a disability you may ask for assistance from poll workers at your polling place. If you cannot enter the polling place because of physical disabilities, need help marking your ballot because of physical disabilities, have visual disabilities, or cannot read, you may be assisted by a person of your own choosing. In all these cases, the person who provides assistance to you must swear or affirm that your ballots will be marked in accordance with your wishes. If you are unable to vote inside the polling place, two precint officials will help you to vote outside the polling place.

    You may also choose to vote independently by telephone. Telephone voting is available upon request at your polling place on Election Day. Please contact your county election boards to verify this device is located at your polling place. It should also be available at the county election board office during early voting. An election official dials into the telephone voting system and selects the correct ballot from a menu of options. You will then listen to the ballot over the telephone and make selections using the telephone keypad. You may review and, if necessary, change any selection and may hear all choices read back before finally casting the ballot.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    Oregon

    If you are an Oregon voter with a disability, you can receive assistance to register to vote, vote your ballot, or return your ballot by contacting your county elections office office or by calling 1-866-ORE-VOTES. You can also request assistance from a caretaker, care provider or someone else you personally choose.

    For more information on Oregon's resources for voters with disabilities please utilize your state's resource or the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

    Pennsylvania

    Any voter who requires assistance to vote by reason of blindness, disability, or inability to read or write may be given assistance by a person of the voter's choice, other than the voter's employer or agent of that employer or officer or agent of the voter's union. The Judge of Elections cannot assist a voter with disabilities.

    For those voters who have a disability or are elderly and assigned to an inaccessible polling place, the Secretary of the Commonwealth has directed the county boards of elections to make available to those voters, upon their request, an Alternative Ballot. An Alternative Ballot may be cast with the county board of elections by 8 p.m. (or the close of polls) on Election Day. However, an application for an Emergency Alternative Ballot may be submitted until 8:00 P.M. on Election Day. The prescribed form by which an eligible voter might apply for an Alternative Ballot is available by:

    Applications for alternative ballots must be submitted to your County Board of Elections no later than 5pm on the Tuesday before Election Day.

    For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

      Rhode Island

      If you are blind, disabled or unable to read or write, you may be given assistance at the polls by a person of your choice as long as that person is not your employer or agent of your employer, or officer or agent of your union.

      Every polling place is situated in a building which can be entered and exited by persons who are disabled or elderly. If you are disabled or elderly and the assigned polling place is inaccessible, the local board must provide alternative means for you to cast a ballot on Election Day. DRE machines will be available for the handicapped.

      For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

      South Carolina

      Assistance in marking a ballot is allowed only if you are blind, illiterate or physically handicapped. If you are entitled to receive assistance you may choose anyone to assist except your employer, an agent of your employer, or an officer or agent of your union. If you, because of physical handicap or age (65 or older,) cannot enter the polling place in which you are registered to vote, or are unable to stand in line to vote, you may vote outside that polling place in the closest available parking area utilizing the vehicle in which you have driven or have been driven to the polls.

      For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

      South Dakota

      If you cannot mark a ballot because you have a physical disability or cannot read, you may ask any person to help you vote. For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

      Tennessee

      Polling places are generally accessible and the voting machines comply with HAVA. If you have disabilities, you are allowed to bring someone to help you vote.You may also request assistance from poll workers. Such assistance will be provided by two poll workers, one from each party. For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

       

      Texas

      If you have a sickness or physical condition that prevents you from voting without personal assistance or voting could negatively impact your health, you are eligible to vote using the early voting by mail materials on election day, at the main early voting polling place, or at your precinct polling place.

      If you are physically unable to enter the polling place, an election official may deliver the ballot to you at the entrance or curb of the polling place. If you are physically unable to mark your ballot, or cannot read the ballot, you are eligible for assistance. You may choose anyone as an assistant except your employer or an officer of your union, or an agent of either. The assistant must take an oath of assistance administered by an election official. The assistant may read the ballot to you and mark your ballot. If you do not choose your own assistant, two election officials (of different political parties in the General Election) may assist you. Poll watchers and inspectors can observe the assistance by election officials.

      An interpreter may be used if you and the election official cannot speak the same language. The interpreter must be a registered voter of the county, must take the oath of assistance and may interpret for any number of voters. Under HAVA, all Texas counties must provide one direct electronic voting machine (DRE) at each polling place for use by voters with visual disabilities, so they may cast their ballot without assistance. These machines are equipped with headphones and a keypad.

      For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

      If you are a person with a disability and have questions about your voting rights, call Disability Rights Texas’ Voting Hotline at 1-888-796-VOTE (8683)

      Utah

      If you are blind, have a disability, or are unable to read or write English, you may be helped by a person of your choice. This person cannot be your employer, an agent of your employer, or an officer or agent of your union. The person helping cannot in any way request, persuade, or induce you to vote for or against any particular candidate or issue.

      For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

      Vermont

      Polling places must allow all voters to conveniently and privately cast their votes. This means that polling places should be accessible to all voters, including people with physical and mental disabilities, as well as the elderly. All polling places in Vermont should be physically accessible. If you find a polling place that is not, you should notify the secretary of state's office, who will work with the town to ensure that steps are taken to make it accessible. If you have a unique accessibility need, you should give the town reasonable advance notice so that the town can take steps to accommodate your needs.

      If you are sick or disabled, you can ask that election officials bring a ballot to your car, as long as the car is next to the polling place. Two election officials will bring the ballot to the car and assist you if you request it, and then they will return to the polling place and place the completed ballot in the ballot box or optical scan machine. All voters have the right to have someone assist them in voting and voters may bring in devices, such as a magnifying glass to help them vote.

      If you require assistance and have brought someone with you to help, simply tell the election officials that you have someone to help you with the voting process. The person providing assistance can be anyone of your choosing, as long as the person helping is not your employer or union representative. You should not have to reveal that you have a disability or why you may need assistance. The person helping can do such things as read the ballot to you, help fill out the paper ballots or use the voting machine.

      If you need assistance and did not bring someone to the polls to help, two election officials will provide whatever assistance is needed. When you check in to vote, simply tell the election workers that you need assistance. With no questions asked, you must be provided that assistance.

      If you spoil a ballot (mark the ballot improperly), or decide to change how you voted before putting the ballot in the ballot box or optical scan machine, you may ask for a new ballot. Every person is allowed to ask for a new ballot, up to three times, but can only cast one vote. If you vote for more than the number of candidates allowed in a particular race, the optical scan machine will reject the ballot to give you the chance to correct the ballot so your votes will count. In towns that count by hand, there will be reminders by the ballot box asking you to check your ballot to correct any overvotes. You can ask for help in putting your ballots into the ballot box or optical scan machine.

      The Help America Vote Act (HAVA) required states to implement voting systems that are accessible for individuals with disabilities and permit voters who are blind or visually-impaired to cast their votes privately and independently. The vote-by-phone system purchased by the State of Vermont is designed to meet this mandate. When you go to your polling place and check in at the entrance checklist, indicate that you wish to use the vote-by-phone system. A poll worker uses a designated telephone to call the system, enters the poll worker and ballot access IDs to bring up the appropriate ballot, then gives the phone to you and leaves the voting booth. The system reads the ballot to you and, after you make ballot selections using the telephone key pad, the system prints out a paper ballot at the office of the secretary of state. The paper ballot is automatically scanned and can be played back to you for verification upon your request. You may decide to cast it or discard it and revote.

      Every polling place has a telephone voting system available for voters who wish to use it in the primary or general election. The Vote-by-Phone (at the polls) system was created to enable voters with disabilities to vote privately and independently. When you vote-by-phone you listen to the choices using the handset or a headset, and then you mark your ballot bypressing a telephone key pad. The system reads back the paper ballot for you before it is cast so you can be sure that it marked your choices correctly. Find out more information about the vote-by-phone system here.

      For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People with Disabilities resource.

      Virginia

      Any person, regardless disability status, has the right to register to vote at any office or agency that provides such a service. These offices include but are not limited to: Department of Health (VDH), Department of Social Services (DSS), Department of Mental Health (DMHRSAR), Department for Rehabilitation Services (DRS), Department for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (VDDHH), and the Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI).

      Your local registrar's office also has registration forms and should be able to accommodate any special needs. In addition, you can download a voter registration form from the state board of elections website.

      • Curbside voting is still available for people ages 65 and older, or any person with a disability. With the implementation of HAVA (Help America Vote Act), curbside voters may now be able to vote on an electronic voting device in lieu of a paper ballot. However, some cities continue to use paper ballots. To vote curbside you must ask your driver or other individual to inform the election officers that there is a person that wishes to vote curbside. The necessary equipment will then be brought to you in your vehicle. You shall be afforded every opportunity to vote in a private and independent fashion, but voting equipment must remain in the view of the election officers.
      • You have the right to have an election officer or other person help you vote if you are physically disabled, unable to read or unable to write. Blind voters may also have any person assist them.
      • You may have anyone who is not your employer or union representative assist you. The officer of election or other person so designated who helps you prepare your ballot shall do so in accordance with your instructions, without soliciting your vote or in any manner attempting to influence your vote, and shall not in any manner divulge or indicate, by signs or otherwise, how you voted on any office or question. For individuals with vision impairments the state board of elections works to provide large print copies of all voting related material. Your local registrar's office should have large print versions of all materials in circulation at this time.
      • In accordance with the Help America Vote Act, Virginia is in the process of making all of its polling places fully accessible to elderly voters and voters with disabilities. If you find that your polling place is not accessible for any reason please fill out the voter accessibility feedback form. The state board of elections is dedicated to providing the best voting experience possible, and will value your input and will keep any remarks confidential.
      • In accordance with the Help America Vote Act, every polling location in Virginia must be equipped with at least one accessible voting system that will allow all voters with a disability to vote in the same private and independent manner as a voter without a disability. If you require voting assistance due to a physical disability or inability to read or write, you can receive it upon request. Any of the election officers can advise you of your rights in this area. If you have cognitive disabilities, due to any reason, you can be eligible to vote if you are not currently ruled to be mentally incompetent by a court of law.

      For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

      Washington

      Federal law requires that every voting center have a voting system that is accessible to all individuals with disabilities. The law requires that the system provide individuals with disabilities the same opportunity to vote privately and independently as other voters. When possible, the county auditor must use voting centers that are accessible to all voters. In instances where a voting center does not meet accessibility standards, additional assistance must be available. The accessibility standards include:

      • Written notice to voters assigned to an inaccessible voting center explaining the factors that make the voting center inaccessible. This notice must be provided no later than 30 days prior to an election.
      • Reassignment to an accessible voting center upon advance request from a voter assigned to an inaccessible polling place.
      • A disabled parking space.
      • Signs identifying an accessible route of travel to the voting center if different than the primary route.
      • An unobstructed route of travel to the voting center.
      • Level, firm, stable and slip-resistant surfaces.
      • An unobstructed area for voting.
      • At least one voting booth with a maximum height of 30 inches and a minimum knee clearance of 27 inches.
      • Sufficient lighting along the accessible route of travel and within the voting center.

      Please contact your county elections department to learn about multilingual services that may be available at your voting site. Assistance may be provided by a person of the voter's choice, or by two election officials of opposite political parties.

      For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

      West Virginia

      If your health or disability does not permit you to go to the polls, you may get a mail in ballot. Be sure to apply early enough so that your application reaches the clerk at least six days before the election. If you are permanently unable to go to the polls, you may apply to be placed on the permanent absentee voting list to vote by mail. A doctor's statement must be filed with your application, but once approved, the clerk will automatically send you an absentee ballot before each election.

      You can also utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

      Wisconsin

      Wisconsin ensures that voting be accessible for individuals with disabilities, including non-visual accessibility for the blind and visually impaired, in a manner that provides equal access and participation (including privacy and independence).

      Any voter who needs help at the polls has a right to assistance. By law, a polling place must be accessible to a person with disabilities. It is a good idea to check the accessibility of the polling place ahead of time. You may find the building not accessible or have trouble getting to the polling location inside the building. If so, you may request that a poll worker bring a ballot to the building entrance or bring a friend along to assist you. If your polling place is notaccessible, notify your city, town or village clerk's office and the State Elections Board.

      You can have help in casting your ballot if you have problems reading or writing, have difficulty with the English language or have a disability which prevents you from being able to mark the ballot or operate the voting machine. Ask for help when you give your name and address to the poll worker. Anyone you choose can help you, except your employer, an agent of your employer, or (if you belong to a labor union), an agent of your labor union. The person who is helping you must give his name and address to the pollworkers and must sign the back of your ballot.

      For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

      Wyoming

      Voters with disabilities have the opportunity to vote privately and independently becasue each polling place is equipped with a voting machine that allows the voter to listen to the ballot and make selection using a key pad.

      In addition, assistance for disabled voters is given at the poll when requested. If you have a disability you may also vote by absentee ballot. Any qualified elector may request a ballot be mailed to another qualified elector.

      For more information, you can utilize the American Association of People With Disabilities (AAPD) resource.

      Vote by Mail

      Colorado

      Colorado voters now have the option to vote by mail. All registered voters will receive mail ballots. The ballot is then voted and must be received by the county clerk and recorder no later than 7pm on Election Day. Postmarks do not count. Voters are encouraged to drop off their ballots at designated drop off sites or mail the ballot in time to be received by the 7pm deadline. Contact your county clerk and recorder for drop-off locations.

      Voters still have the option to vote at the polls. You may surrender your mail ballot when you vote in person. Contact your county clerk and recorder for information about your polling center.

      Oregon

      Oregon has a vote by mail process. Instead of using traditional polling places where voters go to cast ballots on Election Day, a ballot is mailed to each registered voter. The ballot is then voted and returned to the county election office to be counted. In Oregon, ballots will be mailed any time between 14 to 18 days before the election. After it is voted, the ballot may be mailed or hand-delivered to the county election office. In order to be counted, the ballot must be received by the county election office or designated drop site no later than 8:00 pm on Election Day. Postmarks do not count. If you are a registered voter, your ballot will be automatically sent to you. You can call 1-866-ORE-VOTES or contact your county election office to make sure your vote was received.You will need to sign the return envelope of your ballot. Your signature will be matched with your voter registration card to verify your identity.

      List of dropboxes.

      Washington

      Washington State votes by mail. Your ballot is mailed to you at least 18 days before each election. In order to receive your ballot your voter registration address must be current. You can update your address online with MyVote.

      Your ballot packet will include a ballot, a secrecy envelope and a return envelope. If you need a replacement ballot contact your county election officials.

      The ballot must be

      • Postmarked no later than Election day; or
      • Returned to a designated ballot drop box by 8pm on Election Day; or
      • Returned in person to your county elections department by 8pm on Election Day

      If you fail to sign the ballot declaration, or the signature on the ballot declaration does not match the signature in your voter registration record, your county elections department will contact you.


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