Vote411.org
League of Women Voters

Voting In

At a glance:

Voting Alert

Early Voting

Early voting for the July 22nd Primary Run-off Election is June 30 - July 18.  You can find your Early Voting locations here.

Information for the Run-Off:

  • If you did not vote in the primary election, you cannot vote in the run-off
  • If you selected a Democrat or Republican ballot in the primary, you must vote that same ballot choice for the run-off

To find your early voting locations, visit your state resource.

Any voter registered in Georgia may vote absentee in person. This allows you to vote on a day and time that is convenient for you. Beginning the 4th Monday prior to Election, simply visit your county or municipality early voting site, fill out the application and present one of the permitted forms of photo ID. As Election Day approaches, your county may have multiple early voting sites and even extended hours. Voting times and locations for your precinct can be found here.

Please note that you cannot vote on the day immediately preceding the Tuesday election. Traditional polling places will be open on Election Day. However, if you choose to advance vote you cannot cast another ballot at your precinct on Election Day.

ID Needed for Voting?

Photo IDs are required. Several forms of ID are acceptable:

  • Driver's license
  • Photo ID card
  • Concealed handgun carry license
  • US Passport
  • State or Federal government employee identification
  • US military identification
  • ID card from an accredited post-secondary institution in Arkansas
  • Public assistance ID card

If you are a person who lives in a long-term or residential care facility licensed by the state you do not need to show a photo ID. You must have documentation from the facility administrator saying that you are a resident of the facility.

If you are a registered voter with no other form of photo ID, you can get a free photo ID from you county clerk's office. You must complete an application and sign an oath swearing you do not have any kind of photo ID. You must also provide the following information to the clerk:

  • A photo or non-photo identity document including full legal name and date of birth (such as: original or certified copy of a birth certificate, copy of marriage license application, notarized copy of state or federal tax return filed for the previous calendar year, paycheck or pay stub including the imprinted name of the applicant's employer, original Medicare or Medicaid statement to the applicant, original annual Social Security statement for the current or preceding calendar year, certified school record or transcript for the current or preceding calendar year, naturalization document, DD-214 form issued by the federal government to members of the military.)
  • Documentation of name and residential address (such as: utility or cable bill issued within the last 60 days, bank statement issued within the last 60 days, notarized copy of state or federal tax return filed for the previous calendar year, current, valid residential rental contract or receipt for rental payment within the last 60 days, homeowners' insurance policy or bill for current or preceding calendar year, mortgage, payment coupon, deed or property tax bill for current or preceding calendar year, personal property tax bill for current or preceding calendar year, current automobile registration receipt, W-2 issued by employer for the preceding calendar year.)
  • Evidence of registration or proof of application to register to vote
  • Complete application and oath for voter identification card form

Your voter ID card will not be prepared until the clerk has validated the registration information and processed the application. Once approved, the card will be mailed to the mailing address on the application. The ID card is valid as long as you live in the same county where it was issued and you remain registered to vote.

If you do not provide an ID at the polls you may cast a provisional ballot. The provisional ballot will be counted if you return to the county clerk or county election commission by noon the Monday after the election with either proof of identity or an affidavit swearing you do not have a photo ID because of indigence or a religious objecting to being photographed.

ID Needed for Voting?

New ID law in effect for the first statewide election in 2014.

You must present one of the following forms of valid photo ID before voting:

  • Alabama driver's license or non-driver ID card issued by the Alabama DMV
  • Any other photo ID issued by Alabama, any other state government, or the US
  • US passport
  • Employee photo ID card issued by Alabama or the US
  • US military photo ID
  • Alabama photo voter ID card
  • Student or staff photo ID issued by a public or private college, university or postgraduate technical or professional school in Alabama
  • Tribal photo ID card

If you do not have a valid photo ID you  may vote only if you are identified by two election officials in the polling place as a voter on the poll list who is eligible to vote and the election officials execute an affidavit stating this. 

If you do not have a valid photo ID and the election officials are not able to identify you, you must cast a provisional ballot.

Free photo ID available!

If you do not have a photo ID, you may obtain one from the Secretary of State or from your county Board of Registrars. You are able to get a new photo ID card each time you move within the state. If you are elderly or have a disability such that your polling place is not accessible, you are not required to produce identification when voting by absentee ballot.

Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Election Day
By Mail:
Monday, October 20, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
State Capitol Building
200 West 24th Street
Cheyenne, WY 82002-0020
Phone:
307-777-7378
Fax:
307-777-7640
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Friday, October 10, 2014
By Mail:
Received Friday, October 10, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
State Election Board
State Capital Building. Rm B-6
PO Box 53156
Oklahoma City, OK 73152
Phone:
405-521-2391
Fax:
405-521-6457
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Monday, October 6, 2014
By Mail:
Received by Monday, October 6, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
180 East Broad Street
Columbus, OH 43215
Phone:
614-466-2655
Fax:
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
No registration is necessary
By Mail:
No registration is necessary
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
600 E Boulevard Avenue
Bismarck, ND 58505-0500
Phone:
701-328-4146
Fax:
701-328-2992
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Friday, October 10, 2014
By Mail:
Postmarked by Friday, October 10, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
State Board of Elections
506 North Harrington Street
PO Box 27255
Raleigh, NC 27611-7255
Phone:
919-733-7173
Fax:
919-715-0315
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Friday, October 10, 2014
By Mail:
Postmarked by Friday, October 10, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Board of Elections
40 Steuben Street
Albany, NY 12207-2108
Phone:
518-473-5086
Fax:
518-486-4546
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Tuesday, October 7, 2014
By Mail:
Postmarked by Tuesday, October 7, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
State Capital North Annex
Suite 300
Santa Fe, NM 87501
Phone:
505-827-3600
Fax:
(505) 827-8403
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Tuesday, September 9, 2014
By Mail:
Received by Tuesday, September 9, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, September 30, 2014 (Special School Board Election)
Office of the Attorney General
44 South Clinton Avenue
PO Box 304
Trenton, NJ 08625-0304
Phone:
609-292-3760
Fax:
609-777-1280
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Election Day
By Mail:
Received by Saturday, October 25, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
State House
Room 204
Concord, NH 3301
Phone:
603-271-3242
Fax:
603-271-6316
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Tuesday, October 14, 2014
By Mail:
Postmarked by Sunday, October 5, 2014. Online registrations are available until Tuesday, October 14, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
101 North Carson Street
Suite 3
Carson City, NV 89701
Phone:
775-684-5705
Fax:
775-684-5718
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Friday, October 24, 2014
By Mail:
Postmarked by Friday, October 17, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
State Capitol Suite 2300
Lincoln, NE 68509
Phone:
402-471-2555
Fax:
402-471-7834
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Tuesday, October 14, 2014
By Mail:
Postmarked by Tuesday, October 14, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State - Elections Division
255 Capitol St NE, Ste 501
Salem, OR 97310
Phone:
1-866-673-8683
Fax:
503-373-7414
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Monday, April 21, 2014
By Mail:
Received by Monday, April 21, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, May 20, 2014
Department of State
210 N. Office Building
Harrisburg, PA 17120
Phone:
717-787-5280
Fax:
717-787-2854
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Sunday, October 5, 2014
By Mail:
Received by Sunday, October 5, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
148 W. River Street
Providence, RI 02904
Phone:
401-222-2340
Fax:
401-222-1444
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Election Day
By Mail:
Received by Wednesday, October 15, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Government Accountability Board
212 East Washington Avenue, Third Floor
P.O. Box 7984
Madison, WI 53707-7984
Phone:
608-266-8005
Fax:
608-267-0500
Email:
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Tuesday, October 14, 2014
By Mail:
Tuesday, October 14, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
State Capitol, Bldg 1, Suite 157-K
1900 Kanawha Blvd East
Charleston, WV 25305
Phone:
304-558-6000
Fax:
304-558-0900
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Monday, October 27, 2014
By Mail:
Postmarked by Monday, October 6. Online Registration deadline - Monday, October 6, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, August 5, 2014 (Primary)
Secretary of State
520 Union Ave. SE
PO Box 40229
Olympia, WA 98504-0229
Phone:
800-448-4881
Fax:
306-664-4619
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Tuesday, October 14, 2014
By Mail:
Received by Tuesday, October 14, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Department of Elections
Washington Building, First Floor
1100 Bank Street
Richmond , VA 23219
Phone:
800-552-9745
Fax:
804-371-0194
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Wednesday, October 29, 2014
By Mail:
Received Wednesday, October 29, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
128 State Street
Montpelier, VT 05633-1101
Phone:
802-828-2464
Fax:
802-828-5171
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Monday, October 20, 2014
By Mail:
Postmarked by Monday, October 6, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Lieutenant Governor
Utah State Capitol
Suite 220
Salt Lake City, UT 84114-2325
Phone:
801-538-1041
Fax:
801-538-1133
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Monday, October 6, 2014
By Mail:
Postmarked by Monday, October 6, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
208 East 10th Street
Thomas J. Rusk Bldg.
Austin, TX 78701
Phone:
512-463-5650
Fax:
512-475-2761
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Monday, October 6, 2014
By Mail:
Postmarked by Monday, October 6, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Department of State
312 8th Avenue North
9th Flr Snodgrass Tower
Nashville, TN 37243
Phone:
615-741-7956
Fax:
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Monday, October 20, 2014
By Mail:
Received by Monday, October 20, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
500 East Capitol Ave. Ste 204
Pierre, SD 57501-5070
Phone:
605-773-3537
Fax:
605-773-6580
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Saturday, October 4, 2014
By Mail:
Received by Saturday, October 4, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
State Election Commission
2221 Devine St. Suite 105
PO Box 5987
Columbia, SC 29250-5987
Phone:
803-734-9060
Fax:
803-734-9366
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Election Day
By Mail:
Postmarked by October 6, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
PO Box 202801
Helena, MT 59620-2801
Phone:
406-444-2034
Fax:
(406) 444-2023
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Wednesday, October 8, 2014
By Mail:
Wednesday, October 8, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
PO Box 1767
Jefferson, MO 65102-1767
Phone:
573-751-2301
Fax:
573-526-3242
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Saturday October 4, 2014 (by noon)
By Mail:
Postmarked by Saturday, October 4, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
401 Mississippi Street
PO Box 136
Jackson, MS 39205-0136
Phone:
601-576-2545
Fax:
601-576-2545
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Monday, October 6, 2014
By Mail:
Received by Monday, October 6, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
2 Martin Luther King Dr. S.E.
Suite 1104 West Tower
Atlanta, GA 30334
Phone:
404-656-2871
Fax:
404-651-9531
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Monday, October 6, 2014
By Mail:
Received by Monday, October 6, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Department of State
Room 316 RA Gray Building
500 South Bronough St.
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0250
Phone:
850-245-6200
Fax:
850-245-6217
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Election Day
By Mail:
Postmarked Monday, October 6, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Board of Elections & Ethics
441 4th Street, NW
Suite 250 North
Washington, DC 20001
Phone:
202-727-2525
Fax:
202-347-2648
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Saturday, October 11, 2014
By Mail:
Received by Saturday, October 11, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
State of Delaware
905 S. Governors Ave
Suite 170
Dover, DE 19904
Phone:
302-739-4277
Fax:
302-739-6794
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Tuesday, October 28, 2014
By Mail:
Postmarked by Tuesday, October 21, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
30 Trinity Street
PO Box 150470
Hartford, CT 06115-0470
Phone:
860-509-6100
Fax:
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Election Day
By Mail:
Received by Tuesday, October 14, 2014 Completed online at www.govotecolorado.com by Monday, October 27, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
1700 Broadway
Suite 270
Denver, CO 80290
Phone:
303-894-2200
Fax:
303-869-4861
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Monday, October 20, 2014
By Mail:
Monday, October 20, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
1500 11th Street
5th floor
Sacramento, CA 95814
Phone:
916-657-2166
Fax:
916-653-3214
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Monday, October 6, 2014
By Mail:
Postmarked by Monday, October 6, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
State Capitol Room 256
Little Rock, AK 72201
Phone:
501-682-1010
Fax:
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Monday, October 6, 2014
By Mail:
Received by Monday, October 6, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
1700 West Washington Street
7th floor
Phoenix, AZ 85007-2808
Phone:
602-542-8683
Fax:
602-542-1575
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Sunday, September 7, 2014
By Mail:
Received by Sunday, September 7, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, October 7, 2014 (Regional Educational Attendance Area)
Division of Elections
PO Box 110017
Juneau, AK 99811-0017
Phone:
907-465-4611
Fax:
907-375-6480
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Monday, October 6, 2014
By Mail:
Received by Monday, October 6, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Hawaii Votes
802 Lehua Avenue
Pearl City, HI 96782
Phone:
808-453-8683
Fax:
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Election Day
By Mail:
Received by Friday, October 10, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
700 West Jefferson
PO Box 83720
Boise, ID 83720-0080
Phone:
208-334-2300
Fax:
208-334-2282
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Tuesday, October 7, 2014
By Mail:
Received by Tuesday, October 7, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
State Board of Elections
2329 S. MacArthur Blvd
Springfield, IL 62704
Phone:
217-782-4141
Fax:
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Election Day
By Mail:
Received by Wednesday, October 15, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
180 State Office Building
100 Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr Blvd
St. Paul, MN 55155-1299
Phone:
651-215-1440
Fax:
651-296-9073
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Monday, October 6, 2014
By Mail:
Postmarked by Monday, October 6, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Department of State
Michigan Department State
Lansing, MI 48018
Phone:
1-800-292-5973
Fax:
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Wednesday, October 15, 2014
By Mail:
Received by Wednesday, October 15, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of the Commonwealth
1 Ashburton Place
McCormack Room 1705
Boston, MA 2108
Phone:
617-727-2828
Fax:
617-742-3238
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Tuesday, October 14, 2014 by 9pm
By Mail:
Postmarked by Tuesday, October 14, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
State Board of Elections
PO Box 6486
151 West St. Suite 200
Annapolis, MD 21401-0486
Phone:
410-269-2840
Fax:
410-974-2019
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Election Day
By Mail:
Received by Tuesday, October 14, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
101 State House Station
111 Sewall St. 4th floor
Augusta, ME 4333
Phone:
207-624-7736
Fax:
207-287-5874
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Monday October 6, 2014
By Mail:
Monday, October 6, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
PO Box 94125
8549 United Plaza Blvd.
Baton Rouge, LA 70804-9125
Phone:
225-922-0900
Fax:
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Monday, October 6, 2014
By Mail:
Postmarked by Monday, October 6, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
700 Capital Avenue
Suite 152
Frankfort, KY 40601
Phone:
502-564-3490
Fax:
502-564-5687
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Tuesday, October 14, 2014
By Mail:
Received by Tuesday, October 14, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
120 SW 10th Avenue
Memorial Hall 1st flr
Topeka, KS 66612-1594
Phone:
785-296-4561
Fax:
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Election Day
By Mail:
Received by 5pm, Saturday, October 25, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
321 East 12th Street
Lucas Building
Des Moines, IA 50319
Phone:
515-281-0145
Fax:
515-281-7142
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Monday, October 6, 2014
By Mail:
Received by Monday, October 6, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
302 West Washington Street
Room E-204
Indianapolis, IN 46204
Phone:
317-232-3939
Fax:
Registration Deadlines
In Person:
Tuesday, October 21, 2014
By Mail:
Received by 5 pm Tuesday, October 21, 2014
Election Dates:
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election)
Secretary of State
PO Box 5616
Montgomery, AL 36130-5616
Phone:
334-242-7210
Fax:
334-242-2444

Links and Resources

Asian American Election Hotline - 1-888-API-VOTE or 1-888-274-8683

Pages

Eligibility Requirements

To be eligible to vote in the District of Columbia you must be:

  • A U.S. citizen
  • A D.C. resident
  • At least 18 years old on or before the election
  • Not in jail for a felony conviction
  • Not been adjudged mentally incompetent by a court of law
  • Not claiming the right to vote anywhere outside D.C.

Eligibility Requirements

To be eligible to vote in Mississippi you must be:

  • Considered mentally competent
  • A U.S. citizen
  • At least 18 years old on Election Day
  • A resident of the state and have lived in your city or town for at least 30 days prior to Election Day
  • Registered to vote at least 30 days prior to Election Day
  • Never convicted of murder, rape, bribery, burglary, theft, arson, obtaining money or goods under false pretenses, perjury, forgery, embezzlement, or bigamy (unless you have received pardons or had your rights of citizenship restored)

Eligibility Requirements

To be eligible to vote in Illinois, you must be:

  • A U.S. citizen
  • At least 18 years of age by Election Day
  • Have been a resident of the precinct at least 30 days prior to Election Day

Eligibility Requirements

To be eligible to vote in New Hampshire you must be:

  • 18 years of age or older on Election Day
  • A U.S. citizen

There is no minimum period of time you are required to have lived in the state before being allowed to register. You may register as soon as you move into your new community.

Eligibility Requirements

To be eligible to vote in Pennsylvania you must be:

  • A citizen of the United States for at least one month before the next primary, special, municipal or general election
  • A resident of Pennsylvania and the election district in which you register and vote for at least 30 days before the general, primary, municipal, special or general election
  • At least 18 years of age on or before the day of the next primary, special, municipal, or general election.

Please note to vote in a primary you must be registered and enrolled in a political party.

Eligibility Requirements

To be eligible to vote in Arizona you must be:

  • A U.S. citizen
  • A resident of Arizona
  • 18 years of age or older on or before the day of the general election
  • Not convicted of a felony or have had your civil rights restored
  • Not adjudicated incompetent

Eligibility Requirements

To be eligible to vote in Louisiana you must be:

  • A U.S. citizen
  • A resident of Louisiana
  • At least 17 years old and 18 years old prior to the next election to vote
  • Not currently under an order of imprisonment for conviction of a felony
  • Not currently under a judgment of interdiction for mental incompetence

Eligibility Requirements

To be eligible to vote in North Dakota, you must be:

  • A U.S. citizen
  • At least 18 years old on Election Day
  • A legal North Dakota resident
  • A resident in the precinct for 30 days preceding the election

For the purposes of voting, a person may have only one residence, shown by an actual fixed permanent dwelling, or any other abode. Residency in North Dakota is defined as:

  • Every person has a residence. It is the place where one remains when not called elsewhere for labor or other special or temporary purpose, and to which he or she returns in seasons of repose.
  • There can be only one residence.
  • A residence cannot be lost until another is gained.
  • The residence can be changed only by the union of act and intent.

For a copy of the voter's affidavit, please visit your state's resource.

Eligibility Requirements

To be eligible to vote in Texas you must be:

  • A U.S. citizen
  • A resident of the county in which you intend to vote
  • At least 18 years old (you may register at 17 years and 10 months)
  • Not convicted of a felony (unless your sentence is completed, including any probation or parole)
  • Not declared mentally incompetent by a court of law

Eligibility Requirements

To be eligible to vote in Delaware you must be:

  • A citizen of the United States
  • A resident of Delaware (proof required)
  • 18 years of age on or before the date of the next General Election
  • mentally competent

NOTE: Due to the passage of a bill in the 140th General Assembly, Felons are now eligible to vote if they meet certain requirements. The requirements are:

  • The sentence and fines must be satisfied at least 5 years prior to the application date.
  • A Felony conviction of the following disqualifies one of the bill's requirements: murder, sexual crimes, or crimes against the public. To see if you are eligible please contact (302) 739-4277.
    • Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Minnesota you must be:

      • At least 18 years old on Election Day
      • A citizen of the United States
      • A resident of Minnesota for 20 days immediately preceding Election Day
      • Not under court-ordered guardianship in which the court order revokes your right to vote or not been found by a court to be legally incompetent to vote
      • Not convicted of a felony, your felony sentence has expired (been completed,) or you have been discharged from your sentence
      • Not have been ruled legally incompetent by a court of law

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Idaho you must be:

      • A U.S. citizen
      • A resident of Idaho and in the county for 30 days prior to Election Day
      • At least 18 years old before or on Election Day
      • Not convicted of a felony. (If you have been convicted, you must have had your civil rights restored)

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Nevada you must be:

      • 18 years of age or older
      • A U.S. citizen
      • A resident of Nevada for 30 days preceding an election
      • Not declared by a court to be mentally incompetent
      • Not convicted of a felony or have had your civil rights restored
      • Registered to vote

      Note: Recent legislation has provided for automatic restoration of the right to vote for those who have been honorably discharged from prison, probation or parole, with certain exceptions related to the seriousness of the crime committed.

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Kentucky you must be:

      • A U.S. citizen
      • A resident of Kentucky for no less than 28 days before the election
      • At least 18 years old by the date of the general election
      • Not convicted of a felony (or, if so, have had your civil rights restored)
      • Not judged mentally incompetent in a court of law
      • Not claiming the right to vote anywhere outside Kentucky

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in North Carolina, you must:

      • Be a U.S. citizen
      • Be a resident of North Carolina and have lived at your residential address for at least 30 days before the election date
      • Be at least 18 years old by the next general election
      • Have your rights of citizenship restored if you were a convicted felon
      • Rescind any previous registration in another county or state

       

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Tennessee you must be

      • A U.S. citizen
      • 18 years or older before the date of the election
      • A resident of Tennessee (The residence of a person is the place where the person's habitation is fixed and is where, during the periods of absence, the person definitely intends to return.)
      • Not disqualified under the law

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Wyoming you must be:

      • 18 years of age on Election Day
      • A U.S. Citizen
      • A resident of Wyoming and the precinct in which you register
      • Withdrawn from voter registration from any other jurisdiction, if applicable
      • Not convicted of a felony or adjudicated mentally incompetent

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Connecticut you must be:

      • A U.S. citizen
      • A resident of a Connecticut town
      • At least 18 years old by Election Day
      • Completed with confinement and parole if previously convicted of a felony and have had your voting rights restored

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Michigan you must be:

      • A U.S. citizen
      • 18 years old by Election Day
      • A resident of Michigan and at least a 30 day resident of your city or township by Election Day
      • Not confined in a jail after being convicted and sentenced

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Washington you must be:

      • A citizen of the United States;
      • A legal resident of Washington State;
      • At least 18 years old by Election Day;
      • Not disqualified from voting due to a court order; and
      • Not under Department of Corrections supervision for a Washington felony conviction.

      A voter who lacks a traditional residence may use the place he or she currently sleeps at night or spends most of their time. A mailing address could be a General Delivery address or, if permission is granted, the address of a shelter or a friend or a relative. For more information on residency requirements please click here.

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Hawaii, you must be:

      • A United States Citizen
      • A legal resident of Hawaii
      • At least 16 years of age, but you must be 18 years of age on the day of the election to vote
      • Not be an incarcerated felon
      • Not be adjudicated mentally incompetent

      Rules to determine your residency during an election according to the Hawaii revised statutes:

      • Your residence is the place where your habitation is fixed, and to which, whenever you are absent, you have the intention to return.
      • To gain residence in any precinct you must have the present intention of establishing your permanent dwelling within the precinct.
      • If you reside with your family in one place, and do business in another, the former is the your place of residence; but if you have a family and have established your dwelling place somewhere other than with your family (with the intention of remaining there), you shall be considered a resident where you have established such dwelling.
      • The mere intention to acquire a new residence without physical presence at such place, doesn't establish residency, neither does mere physical presence without the concurrent present intention to establish such a place as the your residence.
      • You don't gain or lose residence solely by reason of your presence while employed in the service of the United States of this State, or while a student of an institution of learning, or while kept in an institution or asylum, or while confined in a prison.
      • No member of the armed forces of the United States, the member's spouse or the member's dependent is a resident of this state solely by reason of being stationed in the state.
      • You lose residence in this state if you vote in an election held in another state by absentee ballot or in person.

      Note: There is no express prohibition which prevents active duty military and their dependents from claiming residency in the State of Hawaii, and therefore registering to vote. Taken in its entirety this above section, HRS 11-13, calls for an individual to positively determine residency status and therefore fulfill of one of the qualifications to register to vote.

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Nebraska, you must be:

      • A United States citizen
      • At least 18 years of age on Election Day
      • A resident of Nebraska on or before registration deadline
      • Not a convicted felon; or if convicted your civil rights have been restored at least two years since your sentence has been completed, including probation or parole
      • Not have been officially found to be mentally incompetent
      • Be registered to vote (this requirement is not in place for the presidential elections)

      Note: If you have recently moved to Nebraska, or moved to another state after the registration deadline, then you may only vote a Presidential ballot. By law, your residence is that place at which you have established a home, where you are habitually present, and to which, when you depart, you intend to return. Leaving for temporary purposes, such as military service or school attendance, need not result in a change of residence for voting purposes. However, any permanent change in your residence or address will require you to re-register to vote.

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Alaska you must be:

      • A U.S. citizen
      • 18 years of age or older 90 days before Election Day
      • A resident of the state and of the election district for at least 30 days before Election Day
      • Registered before the election registration deadline
      • Not registered to vote in another jurisdiction

      NOTE: You may register 90 days before your 18th birthday but you must be 18 by Election Day.

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Kansas you must be:

      • A United States citizen
      • 18 years of age or older
      • A Kansas resident

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in New York, you must be:

      • A U.S. citizen
      • 18 years old by the date of the general election
      • A resident of your present address for at least 30 days before the election
      • Not in jail or on parole for a felony conviction
      • Not claiming the right to vote elsewhere

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in South Dakota you must be:

      • A U.S. citizen
      • A resident in South Dakota (To be a resident means the place in which you have a fixed habitation and whenever you are absent intend to return to)
      • At least 18 years old on or before the election
      • Not currently serving a sentence for a felony conviction which included imprisonment, served or suspended, in an adult penitentiary system
      • Not judged mentally incompetent by a court of law

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Wisconsin you must be:

      • A U.S. citizen
      • 18 years or older on Election Day
      • A resident of Wisconsin at least 28 consecutive days before the election
      • Registered to vote or are registering on Election Day

      You are ineligible to vote in Wisconsin if you:

      • Have already voted in the election
      • Are still required to report to a probation or parole officer because of a felony conviction
      • Have been ruled incapable of voting by a judge
      • Have made or become interested, directly or indirectly, in any bet or wager depending upon the result of the election

      You will have to prove residency by providing adequate identification. See "ID Needed for Voter Registration" below for more information.

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Colorado, you must be:

      • A U.S. Citizen
      • 18 years of age
      • A Colorado resident for at least 22 days before an election
      • Not serving a sentence (including parole) or a felony conviction

      Note: Residency for the purpose of voting means the principal or primary home of a person. You must have a residence in order to register to vote.

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Massachusetts, you must be:

      • A US citizen
      • A resident of Massachusetts
      • At least 18 years old on or before Eection Day
      • Not be under legal guardianship with respect to voting, in prison, or convicted of election fraud (even if the prison term is completed)

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Oregon you must be:

      • A resident of Oregon
      • A US citizen (or will become one by Election Day)
      • At least 17 years of age (If you are 17 years of age, you will not receive a ballot until an election occurs on or after your 18th birthday.)

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to register and vote in Virgina, you must be:

      • A resident of Virginia (A person who has come to Virginia for temporary purposes and intends to return to another state is not considered a resident for voting purposes)
      • A U.S. Citizen
      • 18 years old (Any person who is 17 years old and will be 18 years of age at the next general election shall be permitted to register in advance and also vote in any intervening primary or special election)
      • Not claiming the right to vote in any other state
      • Not currently be declared mentally incompetent by a court of law
      • Not a convicted felon, unless you have had your right to vote restored

       

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Georgia you must be:

      • A citizen of the United States
      • A legal resident of Georgia and of the county in which you wish to vote
      • At least 18 years of age by Election Day
      • Not serving any sentence imposed by the conviction of a felony
      • Not judicially determined to be mentally incompetent

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Montana you must be:

      • Registered as required by law
      • At least 18 years old on or before Election Day
      • A U.S. citizen
      • A resident of Montana and of the county in which you intend to vote for at least 30 days
      • Not convicted of a felony, serving a sentence in a penal institution
      • Not judged in a court of law to be of unsound mind

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Alabama, you must be:

      • A United States Citizen
      • A resident in Alabama
      • At least 18 years old
      • Not convicted of a felony (or have had your rights restored)
      • Not legally declared mentally incompetent by a court

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Iowa, you must be:

      • A citizen of the United States
      • A resident of Iowa
      • At least 18 years old on Election Day
        NOTE: If you are 17½ years old, you may register to vote, but your registration will not be effective until your 18th birthday
      • Not convicted of a felony (and if you have, you must have had your voting rights restored)
      • Not currently been judged by a court as incompetent to vote
      • Not voting in any other place

      If you move within the county where you are registered to vote, you may change your address before the close of registration by doing one of the following:

      • Notifying the county auditor in writing. Include your full name as it appears on the voter registration records, your old and new addresses, and your signature. If more than one person is submitting a change, each person must sign the notice.
      • Completing a new registration form.
      • Making the change in person at the county auditor's office or other registration sites.

      Registration forms:

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in New Mexico, you must be:

      • A resident of New Mexico
      • A citizen of the United States
      • Not legally declared mentally incapacitated
      • Not a convicted felon, or a felon who has completed all of the terms and condition of sentencing
      • 18 years or older at the time of the next election

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in South Carolina you must be:

      • A United States citizen
      • At least 18 years old on or before the election
      • A resident of South Carolina
      • Not under a court order declaring you mentally incompetent
      • Not confined in any public prison resulting from a conviction of a crime
      • Not convicted of a felony or offense against the election laws or if previously convicted, have served the entire sentence, including probation or parole, or have received a pardon for the conviction

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in West Virginia you must be:

      • A resident of West Virginia and the county where you register
      • A U.S. citizen
      • At least 18 years old on Election Day
      • Not currently under conviction for a felony, including probation or parole, or a court ruling of mental incompetence

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in California, you must be:

      • A United States citizen
      • A resident of California
      • At least 18 years of age (or will be by the date of the next election)
      • Not in prison or on parole for conviction of a felony
      • Not have been judged by a court to be mentally incompetent to register and vote

      You will need to re-register to vote when:

      • You move
      • You change your name
      • You change your political party affiliation

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Maryland you must be:

      • A U.S. citizen
      • A Maryland resident
      • At least 18 years old
      • Not have been found by a court to be incapable of voting by reason of mental disability
      • Not have been convicted of buying or selling votes
      • Not have been convicted of a felony, or if you have, you have completed serving a court ordered sentence of imprisonment, including any term of parole or probation for the conviction, more information can be found on your state's website

      You may register to vote if you are at least 16 years old but cannot vote unless you will be at least 18 years old by the next general election.

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Oklahoma you must be:

      • At least 18 years old
      • A U.S. citizen
      • A resident of Oklahoma
      • Not convicted of a felony, or if you have been convicted, a period of time equal to the original judgment and sentence has expired
      • Not adjudged to be an incapacitated person prohibited from voting

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Vermont you must be:

      • A U.S. citizen
      • A resident of Vermont
      • A person who has taken the Voter's Oath (formerly called the Freeman's Oath)
      • 18 years of age or older on or before Election Day

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Florida you must be:

      • A citizen of the United States
      • A resident of Florida
      • 18 years of age on or before the date of the next general election
      • Not adjudicated mentally incapacitated with respect to voting in Florida or any other state
      • Not convicted of a felony (and not had your civil rights restored)

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Missouri you must be:

      • 18 years old by Election Day
      • A U.S. citizen
      • A Missouri resident and must be registered to vote in the jurisdiction of the person's domicile prior to the election
      • Not confined under a sentence of imprisonment
      • Not on probation or parole after the conviction of a felony
      • Not convicted of a felony or misdemeanor connected with voting or the right of suffrage

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Indiana, you must be:

      • A citizen of the United States
      • Be at least 18 years old on or before Election Day
      • Reside in your precinct at least 30 days before the election in which you will be voting.
      • Not currently in prison after committing crime
      • Apply to register to vote at least 29 days before the election in which you will be voting. Your registration application must be approved in order to vote

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in New Jersey you must be:

      • A United States citizen
      • 18 years old by the next election
      • A resident of the county for 30 days before the election

      You are not eligible to register to vote if you are serving a jail sentence or are on parole or probation as a result of a conviction of an indictable offense under state or federal law or have been adjudged mentally incompetent. However, in New Jersey, ex-felons can register to vote. Any person who is no longer in prison, or has completed his or her term of probation or parole can register to vote.

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Rhode Island you must be:

      • A citizen of the United States
      • A resident of a Rhode Island city or town where you wish to vote
      • At least 16 years old. However, you must be 18 years old on or before the election to vote in the election

      If you are a convicted felon you must have completed your prison sentence, and have had your rights restored

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Arkansas you must be:

      • A U.S. citizen
      • An Arkansas resident
      • Age 18 before or on Election Day
      • Not presently adjudged mentally incompetent by a court of competent jurisdiction
      • Not convicted of a felony without your sentence having been discharged or pardoned
      • Not claiming the right to vote in another county or state

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Maine you must be:

      • A U.S. citizen
      • A resident in the municipality where you intend to register to vote
      • At least 18 years old to vote

      If you are a student, you have the right to register in the municipality where you attend school, if you have established residency there. You must meet the same residency requirements as all other potential voters, but may not be asked to meet any additional requirements. If you are a student who is not a resident of the municipality in which you attend school, you cannot register in that municipality. You must determine where you have established residency and register to vote there. If residency is determined to be in another municipality or state, absentee voting is possible and encouraged.

      If you are incarcerated in a correctional facility or in a county jail, the municipality where you are incarcerated is not neccessarily your voting municipality, unless you resided in that municipality prior to incarceration. If you are incarcerated in a correctional facility you may apply to register to vote in any municipality where you have previously established a fixed and principal home to which you intend to return.

      You may have a non traditional residence, including, but not limited to a shelter, park or underpass. Your residency is not subject to challenge on the sole basis that it is non traditional.

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Ohio, you must be:

      • A citizen of the United States
      • At least 18 years old on or before the day of the general election
      • A resident of Ohio for at least 30 days immediately before the election
      • Not be incarcerated (in prison) for a felony conviction under the laws of the United States, this state or any other state of the United States
      • Not been declared incompetent for voting purposes by a probate court
      • You haven't been permanently disenfranchised for violating the election laws

      By law, your residence is the place in which your habitation is fixed and to which, whenever you are absent, you have the intention to return. If you continuously reside outside of Ohio for a period of four years or more, you are not a resident of this state for voter registration purposes, except if you are absent from Ohio because of federal or state government employment, including military service. However, you may still be eligible to vote for federal offices under federal law. If you are a student you can vote from your school address if your school address qualifies as your voting residence, as discussed above. Otherwise, if you are registered in your home community, you must vote in that community.

      Eligibility Requirements

      To be eligible to vote in Utah you must be:

      • At least 18 years old on or before Election Day
      • A U.S. citizen
      • A resident of Utah for at least 30 days before Election Day

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      You are not required to show identification when registering to vote. However, if you are a first time voter who registered by mail, you may be required to provide additional documentation that matches the address on your voter registration record. Those meet the following qualifications will need to provide additional documentation:

      • You registered to vote in the county between January 1, 2003 and January 1, 2006

      • or

      • You registered to vote in the state after January 1, 2006

      However, this does not apply if you submitted an application at a license branch or other voter registration agency. If you are a military or overseas voter, or presented this documentation to the county voter registration office with your registration application, you are also exempt from the additional documentation requirement. You should be notified of this requirement when the county receives your registration application or absentee ballot application.

      You may present any of the following types of documents to meet the requirement:

      • Indiana driver's license
      • Indiana state identification card, with your current name and address

      NOTE: An Indiana driver's license or Indiana state identification card may meet both the photo ID requirement and the valid and current address requirement.

      To fulfill the photo ID requirement the document does not need to contain an address that matches the address on the poll list, but must meet the other requirements. However, to meet the additional document requirement, you only need to present a document that contains a matching name and current address to the poll list.

      Other documents that meet the additional documentation requirement:

      • Any other current and valid photo ID that contains your current name and address
      • A current utility bill with your current name and address
      • A bank statement with your current name and address
      • A government check with your current name and address
      • A paycheck with your current name and address
      • Other government documents that show your current name and address

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      If you registered to vote by mail in your county after January 1, 2003 and have never voted in a federal election in the county, you are required to provide your county commissioner of registration with identification. If you registered by mail before January 1, 2003, you are not required to show identification to register.

      If you did not provide identification to the county commissioner of registration or if the identification information could not be verified (i.e., your drivers's license number or the last four digits of your social security number), YOU MUST SHOW IDENTIFICATION AT THE POLLING PLACE WHEN YOU GO TO VOTE.

      Acceptable Identification includes:

      • Any current and valid photo ID
      • Driver’s license
      • Student or job ID
      • Military or other government ID
      • Store membership ID
      • United States passport
      • Bank statement
      • Car registration
      • Government check or document
      • Non-photo driver’s license
      • Rent receipt
      • Sample ballot
      • Utility bill
      • Any other official document

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      If you are a first time voter in Rhode Island, you must provide your valid Rhode Island driver's license number or valid Rhode Island ID number issued by the Rhode Island division of motor vehicles. If you do not have a valid Rhode Island driver's license or Rhode Island ID number, you must provide the last four digits of your Social Security number. If you do not have a driver's license, Rhode Island ID or Social Security number; if these numbers cannot be verified; or if you fail to complete this item on the registration form, you will be required to present one of the forms of identification listed below at the time of registration prior to voting or at the time of voting:

      A copy of a current and valid photo ID provided by a third party in the ordinary course of business that includes your name and photo. Examples:

      • Driver's license or ID card of any state
      • US passport
      • Employee ID card
      • ID card provided by a commercial establishment
      • Credit or debit card
      • Military ID card
      • Student ID card
      • Health club ID card
      • Insurance plan ID card
      • Public housing ID card

      Or a copy of any of the following documents, provided that they include the name and current address of the registering voter and it is dated since the date of the last General Election, unless the document is inteded to be permanent such as a pardon or discharge:

      • Utility bill
      • Bank statement
      • Government check
      • Government paycheck
      • Document issued by a government agency
      • Sample ballot or other official elections document issued by a governmental agency, dated for the election in which the individual is providing it as proof of residency or identity
      • Voter notification card issued by a governmental agency
      • Public housing ID card issued by a governmental agency
      • Lease or rental statement or agreement issued by a governmental agency
      • Student ID card issued by a governmental agency
      • Tuition statement or bill issued by a governmental agency
      • Insurance plan card or drug discount card issued by a government agency
      • Discharge certificates, pardons, or other official documents issued to the individual by a governmental agency in connection with the resolution of a criminal case, indictment, sentence; or other matter
      • Public transportation authority senior citizen and disabled discount cards issued by a governmental agency
      • ID documents issued by a governmental disability agency
      • ID documents issued by government homeless shelters and other government temporary or transitional facilities
      • Drug prescription issued by a government doctor or other governmental health care provider
      • Property tax statement issued by a governmental agency
      • Vehicle registration issued by a governmental agency
      • Vehicle certificate of ownership issued by a governmental agency

      You can bring one of the IDs listed above to the polling place on Election day, or mail a copy of the ID to the local board of canvassers before Election Day.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      If you are registering to vote by mail, you must provide either your driver's license number or the last four digits of your Social Security number on your Arkansas voter registration application. If you do not have any of these items, you may be required to vote on a provisional ballot when you vote for the first time unless you submit a photocopy of one of the following with your mail-in application or at the time of voting:

      • A current and valid photo ID
      • A copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, government check or paycheck that shows your name and address
      • Another government document that shows your name and address

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      When filling out your voter registration card, you must provide either your Maine driver's license number or the last four digits of your Social Security number. If you are a new voter in Maine, you must send a copy of either your Maine driver's license or a utility bill or a government document that states your name and address with your voter registration form. If you are registering less than 21 days before an election, you must register in person at your town office or city hall, through any motor vehicle branch office, in most state & federal social service agencies, or at voter registration drives. You will need to provide proof of identity and residency.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      When registering in person you must provide a current, valid Ohio driver's license number or the last four digits of your Social Security number on the application.

      If registering by mail and you do not provide your current Ohio driver's license or the last four digits of your Social Security number on the application, please enclose with your application a copy of one of the following forms of identification that shows your name and current address:

      • Current valid photo ID card
      • Military ID
      • Current (within one year) utility bill, bank statement, paycheck, government check or government document (except board of elections notifications) showing your name and current address.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      A driver's license or state ID number is required to register to vote. If you do not have either of these identification documents, please fill in the last 4 digits of your Social Security number. If you do not have either write none in the space provided.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      Identification is not required during registration but must be provided the first time you go to the polls.

      If you are registering to vote in the District for the first time on election day, you must show proof of residence by providing one of the following types of documents:

      • Current and valid District of Columbia DMV-issued ID
      • Government check or paycheck
      • Bank statement
      • Current utility bill or lease
      • Other government document showing your name and current District address
      • Statement from a student housing/resident facility
      • Statement of occupancy from a District of Columbia homeless shelter

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      You will need to provide your driver's license number or the last 4 digits of your Social Security number on your voter registration form. If you do not have a driver's license number or Social Security number and you are registering by mail for the first time, you must include one of the following with your application:

      • A copy of current valid photo identification
      • A copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or other government document showing your name and address

      Once you are registered, you generally remain registered indefinitely, unless you move or no longer meet one of the qualifications to vote.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      Two forms of identification are required when registering to vote, one of which must show your current residential address.

      If you register by mail, sufficient proof of identity is fulfilled by submission of your driver's license number or state identification card number.

      If you don't have either of those, verification by one of the following will be required:

      • the last 4 digits of your Social Security Number
      • a copy of a current and valid photo ID
      • a copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, paycheck, government check, or other governmental document that shows your name and address

      You may also demonstrate sufficient proof of identity by submission of a photo ID issued by a college or university along with either a copy of the applicant's contract or lease for a residence or a postmarked mail delivered to the applicant at his or her current address.

      If you register by mail, you must vote in person the first time you vote unless you submit your driver license number or state ID number, the last four digits of your social security number or one of the forms of ID listed above.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      When registering to vote, you are required to provide proof of identity, age, citizenship, and domicile. To prove age, any reasonable documentation indicating you are 18 years of age or older is acceptable. If you do not have sufficient proof of identity, citizenship and domicile, you may sign an affidavit.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      If you have a Pennsylvania driver's license, you must provide your driver's license number on your registration form. If you do not have a Pennsylania license you must supply the last 4 digits of your social security number. If you do not have a Social Security Number, write none in the space provided for this number.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      The simplest form to use for your voter registration in Arizona is the Standard Federal Registration Form which requires those registering to vote to swear an oath that they’re American citizens. The Arizona State Registration form requires additional proof of citizenship that may create barriers and impose financial costs for potential citizen registrants. You can find the federal standardized form in English here and in Spanish here. For more language options go here.

      If you register to vote using the Arizona State Registration form, the following will serve as proof of citizenship and no additional documents are needed:

      • An Arizona driver license or non-operating identification number issued after October 1, 1996: write the number in box 13 of the Arizona Voter Registration form
      • A Tribal Identification number (Bureau of Indian Affairs Card Number, Tribal Treaty Card Number, or Tribal Enrollment Number): write the number in box 16 of the Arizona Voter Registration form
      • The number from your certificate of naturalization: write the number in box 20 of the Arizona Voter Registration form

      If you do not have the above information, you must attach proof of citizenship to the form. Only one acceptable form of proof is needed to register to vote. The following is a list of acceptable documents to establish your citizenship:

      • A legible photocopy of a birth certificate that verifies citizenship and supporting legal documentation (i.e. marriage certificate) if the name on the birth certificate is not the same as your current legal name
      • A legible photocopy of pertinent pages of a United States passport identifying the applicant
      • Presentation to the County Recorder of United States naturalization documents
      • A legible photocopy of a driver license or non-operating identification from another state within the United States if the license indicates that the applicant has provided satisfactory proof of citizenship
      • A legible photocopy of a Tribal Certificate of Indian Blood or Tribal or Bureau of Indian Affairs Affidavit of Birth.

      If you are registered in Arizona and use the registration form because you move within a county, change your name, or change your political party affiliation, you do not need to provide photocopies of proof of citizenship. You only need to provide proof of citizenship if you are a new resident in an Arizona county.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      If you register to vote in person at a parish registrar of voters office, you are required to prove age, residency, and identity. You may submit your current Louisiana driver's license, birth certificate, or other documentation which reasonably and sufficiently establishes your identity, age, and residency.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      No registration is necessary.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      New voter application asks for one of three identification numbers - a Texas Driver's license number, personal ID number issued by the Texas Department of Safety or the last four digits of your Social Security number. If you do not have any of these, you are still eligible to register to vote, but you are required to provide proof of your identity at the polling place. Acceptable ID includes:

      • Driver's license or personal ID card issued by the Texas Department of Public Safety.
      • Texas Election ID certificate issued by DPS
      • Texas personal ID card issued by DPS
      • Texas concealed handgun license issued by DPS
      • US military ID card containing the person's photograph
      • US Citizenship certifcate containing the person's photograph
      • US passport

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      Identification is not necessary to register to vote if you use the National Voter Registration Form. However, when registering with the department of elections or at an alternate approved location, current identification is required. The identification must include current and valid photo ID that shows full name and address. Examples include:

      • Current utility bill
      • Bank statement
      • Government check
      • Paycheck
      • Other government document that shows full name and address

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      To register to vote by mail you need to provide your Minnesota driver's license number or Minnesota ID number. If you do not have a Minnesota driver's license or Minnesota ID, you will need to provide the last 4 digits of your Social Security number. If you have none of these, write NONE in box #10b of your voter registration application. This is required by law.

      To register at the polling place on Election Day, you must have authorized proof of residence. This includes:

      • A valid Minnesota driver's license, learner's permit, Minnesota ID card or receipt for any of these
      • A valid student ID card including your photo, if your college has provided a student housing list to election officials
      • A Tribal ID card that contains your picture and signature
      • A valid registration in the same precinct under a different name or address
      • A notice of late registration sent to you by your county auditor or city clerk
      • A voter registered in the same precinct as you who can confirm your address with a signed oath
      • An employee of the residential facility where you live who can confirm your address with a signed oath
      • Both 1) a phot ID from the list below and 2) a current bill from the list below with your name and address in the precinct

      Photo IDs (may be expired)

      • Minnesota driver's license
      • Minnesota ID card
      • United States passport
      • United States military ID card
      • Tribal ID card
      • Minnesota University, College or Technical College ID card

      Bills (delivered electronically or by mail)

      • Utility bill due within 30 day sof election day (telephone, TV, internet service, electric, gas, solid waste, sewer services, water)
      • Rent statement dated within 30 days of election day that itemizes utilities
      • Current student fee statement

      You must re-register if your name or address changes or you have not voted in four years.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      If you are a first time voter in Idaho, you must either submit a copy of one of the following items with your registration form or show it at the polls prior to voting:

      • A current and valid photo ID
      • A current utility bill
      • Bank statement
      • Government check
      • Paycheck
      • Government document that shows your name and address

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      You should show ID when you register. If not, you will be required to show ID at the polls. ID must show proof of residence, proof of identity, and a picture is required. Examples of recommended identification include a driver's license or any government issued ID. If the current photo identification does not include the voters current address please bring, a copy of a current utility bill, bank statemet, government check, or other government document that shows voter's name and current residence address is required.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      ID is not required when registering to vote.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      Identification is required to register to vote in the form of a driver's license number, or the last four digits of a social security number. If the voter does not have either of these, alternate accepted forms of identification include:

      • Current and valid photo ID
      • Current utility bill
      • Bank statement
      • Paycheck
      • Government check
      • Another Government document that shows the voter's name and address

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      Identification is not required during registration but must be provided at the polls. See "ID Needed for Voting" for more information.

      If you register to vote by mail, the first time you vote you must present an acceptable form of ID. Examples of acceptable IDs are:

      • Current photo ID with voter's name and photo
      • One of the following: a copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck or other government document that shows the voter’s name and address.

      Voters who register by mail must vote in-person the first time they vote after registering.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      When registering to vote (by mail or in person,) you may provide the following forms of acceptable identification:

      • Wyoming driver's license
      • A different state's driver's license
      • An ID card issued by a local, state or federal agency
      • A U.S. passport
      • School ID
      • Military ID

      You can also show two of the following in any combination:

      • Certification of U.S. citizenship
      • Certificate of naturalization
      • Draft record
      • Voter registration card from another state or county
      • Original or certified copy of a birth certificate bearing an official seal
      • Certification of birth abroad issued by the department of state
      • Any other form of identification issued by an official agency

      Wyoming is exempt from the federal motor voter law and does not offer voter registration at the driver's license division. However, you may register at the polls on Election Day with acceptable ID.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      You are required to show identification when registering to vote in person. Acceptable identification includes anything with a name and address: a Connecticut driver's license, a utility bill, or even a checkbook. If you register by mail, you must provide your Connecticut driver's license or the last four digits of your Social Security number on the voter registration form, which will be confirmed by the state's centralized voter registration system. This will avoid additional ID requirements for first-time voters in federal elections. First-time voters who register by mail in a federal election are subject to additional requirements.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      If you are registering to vote in person, you must either show a photo ID or sign an affidavit attesting that you are not in possession of a photo ID. Accepted forms of ID are:

      • Michigan Drivers license
      • Michigan state ID card
      • Drivers license or staet ID card issued by another state
      • Federal or state governemnt issued photo ID
      • US passport
      • Military ID card with photo
      • Tribal ID card with photo
      • Student ID with a photo from a high school or an accredited institution of higher education

      If you register by mail and have never voted in Michigan you must go to the polls to vote in person in the first election in which you participate. You do not need to vote in person if:

      • You personally hand delivered the mail-in registration form to your county clerk
      • You are 60 years old or older
      • You are disabled
      • You are an Overseas voter

      If you are registering for the first time and submitting your registration by mail, you should accurately enter your state issued driver's license number or personal ID card number on the mail-in registration form. If you have neither of these, please provide either a copy of a current and valid photo ID or a copy of a paycheck stub, utility bill, bank statement or government document that states your name and address.

      The residential address you use for voter registration must be the same as the address on your driver's license. Submitting a change for a driver's license address will be applied to your voter registration and vice versa.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      ID is necessary to register. If you register by mail and do not have a Washington state driver's license, Washington state ID card, or a Social Security number, you will be required to provide one of the following items when you cast your ballot:

      • Valid photo ID
      • Valid tribal ID of a federally recognized Indian tribe in Washington state
      • Copy of a current utility bill
      • Current bank statement
      • Copy of a current government check
      • Copy of a current paycheck
      • A government document that shows both your name and address

      If you do not provide one of the above items either before or at the time of voting, your ballot will be treated as a provisional ballot.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      It is not necessary to show any form of ID when registering to vote in person.

      If you registering to vote for the first time and are mailing the application form, you must provide proof of identification. Proof of identification includes a copy of:

      • A current and valid photo ID
      • A current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck or government document that shows your name and address

      If you do not provide the required proof of identification you will be required to do so at your polling place, or with your voted absentee mail-in ballot.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      You do not need to show identification when you register to vote in person.

      If you register to vote for the first time in Nebraska by mail, you must provide a copy of a current and valid photo ID, or a copy of a utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck or other government document which is dated within 60 days before date of presentation showing your name and address.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      If you register by mail, you are required to include information that will verify your identity. If you have not previously registered to vote in Alaska and you are submitting your registration application by mail, you must provide a copy of one of the following:

      • Driver's license
      • State ID card
      • Birth certificate
      • Passport
      • In addition, please provide:

        • Your birth date
        • Your Social Security number or at least the last 4 digits of your Social Security number

        If your identity cannot be verified when you register to vote, you will be required to provide certain identification when voting.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      You can register to vote either on paper by printing this form and return the complete form to your county election office (county addresses are listed on the back of the application). Or, if you have a valid Kansas driver's license or nondriver's ID card you can register to vote online.

      Any person registering to vote in Kansas for the first time will be required to provide satisfactory evidence of US citizenship. If you do not submit citizenship documentation at the time you submit your registration application, you can submit it at a later date. You may either mail or deliver the document to the county election office by the close of business on the day before the election or submit it electronically (fax, email or other electronic means approved by the Secretary of State) by midnight the day before the election.

      Valid citizenship documents include:

      • Driver's license or nondrivers ID card issued by the Division of Vehicles
      • Birth certificate that verifies US citizenship
      • US passport or pertinent pages of the applicant's US valid or expired passport identifying the applicant and the applicant's passport number
      • US naturalization documents or the number of the certificate of naturalization. (If only the number of the certificate of naturalization is provided, the applicant will not be included on the registration rolls until the number of the certificate of naturalization is verified with the US Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services by the county election officer or the Secretary of State).
      • Other documents or methods of proof of US citizenship issued by the federal government pursuant to the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952
      • Bureau of Indian Affairs card number, tribal treaty card number or tribal enrollment number
      • Consular report of birth abroad of a citizen of the US
      • Certificate of citizenship issued by the US Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services
      • Certification of report of birth issued by the US Department of State
      • American Indian card, with KIC classification, issued by the US Department of Homeland Security
      • Final adoption decree showing the applicant's name and US birthplace
      • US military record of service showing applicant's place of birth in the US
      • Extract from the a US hospital record of birth created at the time of the applicant's birth indicating the applicant's place of birth in the US

      If the citizenship document submitted by a voter is deemed unsatisfactory due to an inconsistency between the citizenship document and the name or sex indication on the applicant's voter registration application, the applicant may sign a Form CDU explaining the inconsistency. The applicant must state the nature of the inconsistency, the reason for it, and must swear under oath that, despite the inconsistency, the applicant is the person reflected in the citizenship document.

      If you cannot meet the citizenship verification requirement because you do not possess any of the documents listed above, you may:

      • If born in Kansas, apply for a free birth certificate using Form BCA and Form VS-235 10/09
      • If not born in Kansas, instructions for obtaining a birth certificate in another state or territory may be found at the National Center for Health Statistics website
      • Appeal to the state election board for consideration of the registration application by submitting Form RCD

       

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      To register to vote you must have either a verifiable New York State driver's license number or the last four digits of your Social Security number. If you do not have either of these, and you are registering for the first time by mail, you may provide a copy of one of the following:

      • A valid photo ID
      • A current utility bill
      • A bank statement
      • A government check
      • Some other government documentation that shows your name and address

      If you do not provide identification with this form, you will be asked for it the first time you vote.Forms of current and valid photo identification include but are not limited to:

      • Passport
      • Government ID card
      • Military ID card
      • Student ID card
      • Public housing ID card
      • Any ID specified by HAVA and New York State law as acceptable
      • Utility bill
      • Bank statement
      • Paycheck
      • Government check (Social Security, tax refund, military paycheck or paycheck stub)
      • Other government documents with your name and address including but not limited to: voter registration card, hunting, fishing, or trapping license or firearm permit.

       

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      You are required to show your South Dakota driver's license or provide the last 4 digits of your Social Security number when registering to vote.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      To register to vote, you are required to supply your Wisconsin department of transportation issued driver's license or ID card number. If you have not been issued a Wisconsin driver's license or ID, you must provide the last 4 digits of your Social Security number or your Wisconsin state ID card number. Alternately, you may indicate that you have not been issued a Wisconsin driver's license, ID, or Social Security number. Your registration cannot be processed until you provide this information.

      You must provide proof of residence in order to establish your current address. The following constitute acceptable proof of residence (must contain your current and complete name, a current and complete residential address, including a numbered street address, if any and the name of a municipality):

      • A current and valid Wisconsin driver's license
      • A current and valid Wisconsin ID card
      • Any other official identification card or license issued by a Wisconsin governmental body or unit
      • Any ID card issued by an employer in the normal course of business and bearing a photo of the card holder, but not including a business card
      • A real estate tax bill or receipt for the current year or the year preceding the date of the election
      • A residential lease which is effective on day of registration (this will not be sufficient for first time voters registering by mail)
      • A university, college or technical institute fee statement within the last 9 months with a student ID
      • A utility bill (gas, electric or telephone service) received within the past 90 days
      • Bank statement
      • Paycheck
      • A check or other document issued by a unit of government

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      Your completed voter registration form must contain your Colorado driver's license number or your Department of Revenue ID number. If you do not have a driver's license or deptartment of revenue ID number, then you must provide the last four digits of your Social Security number. If you do not have any of these forms of ID, please check the appropriate boxes on the registration application form. A unique identifying number will then be assigned to you by the state and you will still be registered to vote. However, if the identification section is left blank and you do not check the box(es) indicating you do not have identification, you will not be registered to vote.

      For more information please contact your county clerk and recorder or contact your local League for more information.

      • A valid U.S. passport
      • A valid Colorado drivers' license,
      • A valid employee identification card with a photograph of the eligible elector issued by any branch, department, agency, or entity of the U.S. government or Colorado, or by any Colorado county, municipality, board, authority, or other political subdivision of this state
      • A valid pilot's license issued by the Federal Aviation Administration or other authorized agency of the United States
      • A U.S. military identification card with photograph of the elector
      • A copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or other government document that show the name and address of the elector. A cable bill, a telephone bill, documentation from a public institution of higher education in Colorado containing at least the name, date of birth, and residence address of the student elector, or a paycheck from a government institution are also sufficient forms of identification
      • A valid Medicare or Medicaid card
      • A certified copy of a U.S. birth certificate
      • Certified documentation of naturalization
      • A valid indentification card issued by department of Revenue in accordance with the requirements of part 3 of article 2 of title 4 CRS.

      Any form of identification that contains an address must have a Colorado address to be valid.

      • Certified documentation of naturalization

      Any form of identification that contains an address must have a Colorado address to be valid.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      You must attach identification to your voter registration form if you are registering to vote for the first time in Massachusetts. If you registered to vote by mail on or after January 1, 2003, you will be required to show identification when you vote for the first time in a federal election. However, you can also send in a copy of your identification with your voter registration form. Acceptable identification must include your name and the address at which you are registered to vote. Examples include:

      • A current and valid driver's license
      • State issued identification card
      • A current utility bill
      • A bank statement
      • A paycheck
      • A government check
      • Other government document showing your name and address

      If you send in a copy of your identification with your mail-in voter registration form, it may not be returned to you. If you do not provide such identification, the Help America Vote Act of 2002 requires that you may only cast a provisional ballot which will be counted later, but only after your eligibility to vote has been determined.

      If you provide your driver's license number or the last four digits of your Social Security number on the voter registration form and those numbers are verified, you will not have to provide identification when you register to vote or at the polls. If you do not provide those numbers or if they cannot be verified (you will notified by your town or city clerk if that happens), then you have to provide identification either at town or city hall prior to the election or at the polls when you vote. Acceptable identification is a copy of any of the following:

      • Current and valid photo identification
      • Government check or official document showing name and address
      • Current utility bill showing name and address
      • Paycheck or stub showing name and address

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      To register to vote, complete the voter registration form online, print it out and sign it. You can fill out the form online, but will still need to print, sign and mail it in. (Please use black ink.) Mail the form to your county elections official or drop it off in person. You must provide acceptable ID information to register to vote. If you have a current, valid Oregon driver's license or ID, you must provide that number on your voter registration form. If you do not have either of these items, you must provide the last four digits of your Social Security number on your voter registration form. If you do not have any of these items, you must affirm this on the voter registration form and provide a copy of one of the following with your voter registration form:

      • Valid photo identification
      • A paycheck stub
      • A utility bill
      • A bank statement
      • A government document
      • Proof of eligibility under the uniformed and overseas citizens absentee voting act (UOCAVA) or the voting accessibility for the elderly and handicapped act (VAEH)

      Your county elections office will mail you a card to let you know that your registration was received. If you are registering in Oregon for the first time, your completed voter registration form must be postmarked 21 days before the election in order to vote in that election. If you are unable to sign your name because of a disability, you should complete the "signature stamp attestation" form, which is available at your local county elections office.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      When submitting your voter registration by mail for the first time, you must provide your Social Security number on the application and a copy of one of the following with your application:

      • A valid photo identification
      • A copy of a utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or other government document that shows your name and address
      • another government document that shows your name and address (for example a voter card)

      Note: If no ID is sent, you must produce ID the first time you vote and it must be in person (not a mailed-in absentee ballot). Click here to download your state's registration form

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      If you are a first time voter, you are required to provide your Social Security number and one of the following acceptable items of identification when you register:

      • A valid Georgia driver's license
      • A valid ID card issued by a branch, department, agency, or any other entity of Georgia, any other state, or the U.S. authorized by law to issue personal ID
      • A valid U.S. passport
      • A government employee photo ID
      • A valid student ID card containing your photograph from any public or private college, university, or postgraduate technical or professional school located within Georgia
      • A valid U.S. military ID card with photo
      • Valid Tribal ID with photo
      • A certified copy of your birth certificate
      • A valid Social Security card
      • A certified naturalization document
      • A certified copy of court records showing adoption, name, or sex change
      • A current utility bill, or a legible copy thereof, showing your name and address
      • A bank statement, or a legible copy thereof, showing your name and address
      • A government check or paycheck, or a legible copy thereof, showing your name and address
      • A government document, or a legible copy thereof, showing your name and address

      You can register by mailing a copy of your identification with your voter registration application; providing a copy of your identification to the registrar during the absentee voting process; or by showing one of the pieces of acceptable identification when voting at your polling place.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      When filling out the registration form, you must provide either a driver's license number, or the last four digits of your Social Security number.

      If you have neither a driver's license or Social Security number, provide (in-person) or enclose (by mail) a copy of one of the following:

      • Any photo ID with your name
      • A current utility bill
      • Bank statement
      • Paycheck
      • Government check
      • Other government document that shows your name and current address

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      Identification is not currently required when registering to vote in Alabama.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      To register to vote in Iowa, you must provide an Iowa driver's license number if you have one. If you do not have an Iowa driver's license, you may use a photo ID that is current, valid and contains an expiration date. The following are acceptable IDs:

      • Iowa non-driver ID card
      • Out-of-state driver's license or non-driver ID card
      • U.S. passport
      • U.S. military ID
      • ID card issued by employer
      • Student ID issued by an Iowa high school or college

      If your photo ID does not contain your current address, you may use another document to prove where you live if it contains your name and current address. The following are considered acceptable proof of residence:

      • Residential lease
      • Utility bill (including cell phone bill)
      • Bank statement
      • Paycheck
      • Government check or other government documen

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      If the voter registration application is submitted by mail and it is the first time you have registered in your county or in the state of New Mexico, you must submit a copy of a current valid photo ID or a copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, paycheck or other government document that shows your name and address. Submitting this identification information will allow you to avoid showing personal identification at your polling place on Election Day.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      If you are registering for the first time by mail, you must attach a copy of a current valid photo ID or a copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, paycheck or other government document that shows your name and address in the county where you wish to vote. If you do not provide this identification information by mail, you will be required to provide it when you vote.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      If you register in person, you must bring proof of physical address. Examples include a driver's license, utility bill, bank statement, paycheck, or other government document.

      If you are registering by mail, fill out the application and remember to submit a copy of a current and valid ID or bring proof of identification with you to the polls.

      First time West Virginia voters who have registered by mail and did not provide verification with application must show identification at the polls.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      To register to vote in California you will have to provide your California drivers' license number or identification card number or the last four digits of your Social Security Number (SSN). If you do not include this information you will be required to provide identification when you vote.

      If you register to vote by mail and submit a driver's license number that the state or local elections official can match with an existing state identification record, then you will not be required to provide identification when you vote.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      When registering to vote, you will need to provide either your current, valid Maryland driver's license or MVA ID card number or the last four digits of your Social Security number on your voter registration form.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      When you register to vote you will need to provide your identification with your application. You can enter your Oklahoma driver's license number or the last four digits of your Social Security number on the form.

      You must sign and date the oath printed on the form. When you sign the voter registration application you swear you are eligible to vote.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      If you are registering for the first time by mail, you must include a photocopy of an acceptable form of ID. These include:

      • A valid photo ID (driver's license or passport)
      • A copy of a current utility bill
      • A copy of a current bank statement
      • A copy of another government document

      If you are registering for the first time in Vermont you must take the Voter's Oath. The Vermont voter registration form contains the voter's oath that must be taken.

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      You must provide your current and valid Florida driver's license number, an ID number or the last 4 digits of your Social Security number to register. If you have none of these numbers, you must write "NONE" on the voter registration form.

      If you register by mail and you are a first-time voter in the State and you have not been issued a Florida driver's license number, Florida I.D. number, or a Social Security number you are required to provide additional identification. To assure that you will not have problems when you go to vote, you should provide a copy of the required identification at the time you mail your voter registration form. If you are voting an absentee ballot, you must provide the proper identification prior to 7 p.m. Election Day or your absentee ballot will not count. The following forms of identification are acceptable if they contain your name and photograph:

      • United States passport
      • Debit of credit card
      • Military identification
      • Student identification
      • Retirement center identification
      • Neighborhood association identification
      • Public assistance Identification

      Instead of the photo ID, you may provide a copy of a current and valid utility bill, bank statement, government paycheck, or other government document containing your name and current residence address. Do not send original identification documents to the supervisor of elections.

      The following persons are not required to provide the identification required under the previous paragraph:

      • Persons 65 years of age or older
      • Persons with a temporary or permanent physical disability
      • Members of the uniformed services on active duty and their spouses and dependants, who, by reason of such active duty, are absent from the county on Election Day
      • Members of the Merchant Marine and their spouses and dependents, who, by reason of service in the Merchant Marine, are absent from the county on Election Day

       

      ID Needed for Voter Registration

      When registering in person, you are required to present a form of personal ID. Accepted forms or ID are:

      • ID issued by the Federal Government, state of Missouri or a local election authority (For example: Missouri driver's license, US Passort, etc.)
      • ID issued by a Missouri institution (public or private) of higher education, including a university, college, vocational and technical schoolse
      • A copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, paycheck, government check or other government document that contains your name and address
      • Driver's license or state ID card issued by another state

      If you do not have any of these accepted forms of ID, you may still cast a ballot if two supervising election judges, one from each major political party, attest they know you.

      ID Needed for Voting?

      New ID law in effect for the first statewide election in 2014.

      You must present one of the following forms of valid photo ID before voting:

      • Alabama driver's license or non-driver ID card issued by the Alabama DMV
      • Any other photo ID issued by Alabama, any other state government, or the US
      • US passport
      • Employee photo ID card issued by Alabama or the US
      • US military photo ID
      • Alabama photo voter ID card
      • Student or staff photo ID issued by a public or private college, university or postgraduate technical or professional school in Alabama
      • Tribal photo ID card

      If you do not have a valid photo ID you  may vote only if you are identified by two election officials in the polling place as a voter on the poll list who is eligible to vote and the election officials execute an affidavit stating this. 

      If you do not have a valid photo ID and the election officials are not able to identify you, you must cast a provisional ballot.

      Free photo ID available!

      If you do not have a photo ID, you may obtain one from the Secretary of State or from your county Board of Registrars. You are able to get a new photo ID card each time you move within the state. If you are elderly or have a disability such that your polling place is not accessible, you are not required to produce identification when voting by absentee ballot.

      ID Needed for Voting?

      You may need to show indentification at the poll if:

      • You registered to vote by mail after January 1, 2003 and you have never voted in a primary or general election in your county of residence
      • Your registration is inactive
      • You have moved from the address where you are registered to vote
      • Your right to vote is challenged
      • The precinct election officials do not know you

      You can use any of these forms of identification:

      • Current and valid photo ID card
      • Copy of a current document that shows your name and address, such as: a utility bill, bank statement, government check, or paycheck

      ID Needed for Voting?

      You do not have to show a photo ID at the polls. If you registered to vote for the first time by mail and you did not provide a copy of a current and valid photo ID along with a current utility bill or bank statement, you will need to present these forms of ID when voting in person or absentee.

      ID Needed for Voting?

      You will be asked to show one of the following Photo IDs on Election Day:

      • South Carolina Driver's License
      • ID Card Issued by South Carolina Department of Motor Vehicles
      • South Carolina Voter Registration Card with Photo
      • Federal Military ID
      • U.S. Passport

      If you do not have one of the above photo IDs, you can get one for free by:

      • Registered voters can get a voter registration card with a photo from their county voter registration and elections office by providing their date of birth and the last four digits of their Social Security number.
      • Get a DMV ID card at a local DMV office. To see what documentation is required click here.

      If you do not have a photo ID on Election Day you may be able to vote a provisional ballot after showing your non-photo voter registration card. You must have a reasonable impediment to obtaining a photo ID in order to vote the provisional ballot. Reasonable impediments include:

      • Religious objection to being photographed
      • Disability or illness
      • Work schedule
      • Lack of transportation
      • Lack of birth certificate
      • Family responsibilities
      • Any other obstacle you find reasonable

      To vote under the reasonable impediment exception:

      • Present your current, non-photo registration card at the polling place
      • Sign an affidavit stating why you cannot obtain a photo ID
      • Cast a provisional ballot that will be counted unless the county election commission has reason to believe your affidavit is false.

      If you do not have a photo ID and do not have a reasonable impediment to obtaining one, or you forgot to bring it with you to the polls, you may still vote a provisional ballot. However, for your vote to be counted you must provide one of the photo IDs to the county election commission prior to certification of the election (usually the Thursday or Friday after the election).

      ID Needed for Voting?

      If you registered by mail, you will have to take a current and valid photo ID or a copy of a current document with your updated name and address the first time you vote.

      ID Needed for Voting?

      A first-time voter who registers and did not provide identification with their application, may need to show identification at the polls. To be safe, bring your driver's license or another photo ID.

      ID Needed for Voting?

      You will be asked to provide identification at the polling place if:

      • You are voting for the first time in Maryland
      • You registered to vote by mail on or after January 1, 2003
      • You have not previously met the identification requirements

      If you registered to vote by mail after January 1, 2006, you most likely satisfied the identification requirement during the registration process. If you did not satisfy the requirement, your county election board will have notified you and requested information to satisfy the identification requirement. You can satisfy the identification requirement by providing one of the following:

      • A copy of a current and valid photo ID (i.e., Maryland driver's license, MVA-issued ID card, student, employee or military ID card, U.S. passport, or any other state or federal government issued ID card.)
      • A copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck or other government document that shows your name and address.

      ID Needed for Voting?

      When voting in person you will need one of the following types of identification:

      • An Oklahoma driver's license
      • State identification card
      • A U.S. passport
      • Military identification
      • A voter identification card recieved by mail from the County Election Board when you registered to vote. The law allows use of the voter identification card even though it does not include a photograph or an expiration date.

      If you do not have proof of identity, you may only vote by provisional ballot. When you cast a provisional ballot you will be required to fill out and sign an affidavit swearing or affirming you are the person identified on the precinct voter registry. Your provisional ballots will be sealed inside a special envelope and not put through the voting device.

      After election day, County Election Board officials will review the information you provided on the affidavit and if it matches your voter registration information they will count your ballot. If the information you provided does not match your voter registration information your vote will be rejected.

      ID Needed for Voting?

      First-time voters that registered by mail and did not provide verification are required to show identification at the polls.

      ID Needed for Voting?

      To vote at the polls, you must provide picture identification that also shows a signature OR picture identification and another form of ID with your signature.

      Examples of accepted photo IDs with a signature are:

      • Florida driver's license
      • Florida identification card issued by the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles
      • United States passport
      • Debit or credit card
      • Military identification
      • Student identification
      • Retirement center identification
      • Neighborhood association identification
      • Public assistance identification

      If you have additional questions about voter ID, please contact your local elections office.

      ID Needed for Voting?

      You must show an acceptable form of ID when going to vote. Acceptable forms of ID are as follows:

      • ID issued by the state of Missouri, an agency of the state, or a local election authority of the state
      • ID issued by the U.S. government or agency
      • ID issued by an institution of higher education, including a university, college, vocational or technical school located within Missouri
      • A copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck or other government document that contains your name and address
      • A driver's license or state ID card issued by another state

      The Missouri DMV will issue free non-driver's licenses to those (with proper identification requirements,) who need them to vote.

      ID Needed for Voting?

      Photo ID is required of all voters casting a ballot in person. There are exceptions for certain confined voters and voters casting absentee ballots by mail. Acceptable forms of ID include: driver's license, passport, military ID or picture ID from the Bureau of Motor Vehicles. The criteria for acceptable ID include:

      • Photograph
      • A name which matches the voter registration record
      • An expiration date after Election Day
      • Must have been issued by the U.S. government or the state of Indiana

      A student ID from an Indiana State school may only be used if it meets all of the four criteria specified above. A student ID from a private institution may not be used for voting purposes. For more information for college students, click here.

      ID Needed for Voting?

      Identification is not required unless you are a first time voter who registered by mail and did not provide ID verification with application. If you registered to vote by mail in your county after January 1, 2003, and never voted in a federal election in the county, you are required to provide your county commissioner of registration with identification.

      Acceptable Identification includes current and valid photo ID such as:

      • Driver's license
      • Student or job ID
      • Military or other government ID
      • Store membership ID
      • United States passport
      • Bank statement
      • Car registration
      • Government check or document
      • Non-photo driver's license
      • Rent receipt
      • Sample ballot
      • Utility bill
      • Any other official document

      Every person registering to vote must provide his or her NJ driver's licensenumber or MVC non-driver ID number. If the registrant does not have either a driver's license or MVC ID, the last four numbers of his or her socialsecurity number must be provided. These numbers will be verified by theNew Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission. The registrant will be notified if the numbers cannot be matched. If the registrant does not have a driver's license, a MVC non-driver ID or social security number can be entered into that box on the registration form.

      If you show identification, you will vote via the voting machine. If you do not show identification, you will vote via provisional ballot and have until the close of business on the second day after the election, to provide identification to the applicable county election office. You will be given a hand-out at the polling place that will tell you which county election office to contact.

      ID Needed for Voting?

      Voters must show a photo ID at the polls. Acceptable IDs include:

      • RI driver's license
      • U.S. passport
      • ID card issued by an educational institution in the United States
      • U.S. military identification card
      • ID card issued by the U.S. government or State of Rhode Island like a RIPTA bus pass
      • Government-issued medical card
      • RI Voter ID

      Registered voters who don't have an acceptable current and valid photo ID can get a free Voter ID the Secretary of State office in Providence during normal business hours. To find more information on where to get a free Voter ID and for information on how to get a Voter ID visit the Secretary of State website

      No eligible voter will be turned away at the polls. Voters who do not bring an acceptable ID to their polling place can vote using a standard Provisional Ballot. The ballot will be counted if the signature they give at the polling place matches the signature on their voter registration.

      ID Needed for Voting?

      Photo IDs are required. Several forms of ID are acceptable:

      • Driver's license
      • Photo ID card
      • Concealed handgun carry license
      • US Passport
      • State or Federal government employee identification
      • US military identification
      • ID card from an accredited post-secondary institution in Arkansas
      • Public assistance ID card

      If you are a person who lives in a long-term or residential care facility licensed by the state you do not need to show a photo ID. You must have documentation from the facility administrator saying that you are a resident of the facility.

      If you are a registered voter with no other form of photo ID, you can get a free photo ID from you county clerk's office. You must complete an application and sign an oath swearing you do not have any kind of photo ID. You must also provide the following information to the clerk:

      • A photo or non-photo identity document including full legal name and date of birth (such as: original or certified copy of a birth certificate, copy of marriage license application, notarized copy of state or federal tax return filed for the previous calendar year, paycheck or pay stub including the imprinted name of the applicant's employer, original Medicare or Medicaid statement to the applicant, original annual Social Security statement for the current or preceding calendar year, certified school record or transcript for the current or preceding calendar year, naturalization document, DD-214 form issued by the federal government to members of the military.)
      • Documentation of name and residential address (such as: utility or cable bill issued within the last 60 days, bank statement issued within the last 60 days, notarized copy of state or federal tax return filed for the previous calendar year, current, valid residential rental contract or receipt for rental payment within the last 60 days, homeowners' insurance policy or bill for current or preceding calendar year, mortgage, payment coupon, deed or property tax bill for current or preceding calendar year, personal property tax bill for current or preceding calendar year, current automobile registration receipt, W-2 issued by employer for the preceding calendar year.)
      • Evidence of registration or proof of application to register to vote
      • Complete application and oath for voter identification card form

      Your voter ID card will not be prepared until the clerk has validated the registration information and processed the application. Once approved, the card will be mailed to the mailing address on the application. The ID card is valid as long as you live in the same county where it was issued and you remain registered to vote.

      If you do not provide an ID at the polls you may cast a provisional ballot. The provisional ballot will be counted if you return to the county clerk or county election commission by noon the Monday after the election with either proof of identity or an affidavit swearing you do not have a photo ID because of indigence or a religious objecting to being photographed.

      ID Needed for Voting?

      If you are already registered to vote, you do not need to provide identification to receive a ballot. If you are registering on Election Day, you will need to provide proof of identity and residency.

      ID Needed for Voting?

      All voters must show an ID at the polls in order to vote a regular ballot. Voters without ID will be able to vote using a provisional ballot after signing an affirmation statement swearing to the voter's identity. Acceptable forms of ID include:

      • Current photo ID issued by the state of Ohio or the U.S. government (even if it shows a previous address)
      • Photo Military ID
      • Bank statement
      • Current paycheck
      • Current government check
      • Current utility bill (including a cell phone bill)
      • Any current government-issued document showing your name and current address

      For voting purposes current means the document was issued on a date within one year immediately preceding the date of the election at which the voter seeks to vote, or has on it an expiration date which has not passed as of the date of the election in which the voter seeks to vote.

      Voters without one of these documents will still be able to vote using a provisional ballot by either providing the last four digits of the voter's Social Security number or by signing an affirmation statement swearing to the voter's identity and providing appropriate ID within 10 days.

      ID Needed for Voting?

      In order to vote in Utah you need a valid voter ID. This is either a form of ID that has your name and photo or two forms of ID that have your name and proof of residence. Accepted forms of ID include:

      • A current, valid Utah driver's license
      • A current, valid ID card issued by the state or a branch, department, or agency of the United States
      • A current, valid Utah permit to carry a concealed weapon
      • A current, valid US passport
      • A valid tribal ID card, whether or not the card includes a photo of the voter

      Or, provide two forms of the following:

      • A current utility bill or copy dated within 90 days before the election
      • A bank or other financial account statement, or a copy
      • A certified birth certificate
      • A valid Social Security card
      • A check issued by the state or federal government or a copy
      • A current, valid Utah hunting or fishing license
      • A paycheck from the voter's employer, or a copy
      • A current, valid US military ID card
      • Certified naturalization documents (not a green card)
      • A certified copy of court records showing the voter's adoption or name change
      • A bureau of Indian Affairs card
      • A tribal treaty card
      • A valid Medicaid or Medicare or Electronic Benefits Transfer card
      • A current, valid ID card issued by a local government within the state
      • A current, valid ID card issued by an employer
      • A current, valid ID card issued by a college, university, technical school or professional school within the state
      • A current Utah vehicle registration

      ID Needed for Voting?

      Identification is required of first-time voters who register by mail and do not provide proof of identification with their application.

      ID Needed for Voting?

      Photo ID is required in order to vote. You must show one of the following forms of ID - expired photo IDs are acceptable as long as they are not more than 10 years old:

      • A driver's license
      • Photo ID card issued by a branch, department or entity of the Staet of Mississippi
      • US passport
      • Government employee ID card
      • Firearms license
      • Student photo ID issued by an accredited Mississippi university, college or community/junior college
      • US military ID
      • Tribal photo ID
      • Any other photo ID issued by any branch, department, agency or entity of the US governemtn or any state government
      • Mississippi Voter ID Card

      If you do not have any of these forms of ID, you can obtain a Mississippi Voter ID Card at no cost. You can apply for a Mississippi Voter ID card at any Circuit Clerk's office during normal business hours. Or call 1-855-868-3745 for more information.

       

      ID Needed for Voting?

      Identification is not required to vote at the polls, although you will be required to verify your signature. However, there are individual circumstances that may require that identification be shown. In those cases, you must present a photo ID, and if the photo ID has an address, it must match the registration address. If a photo ID is not used, the document (examples of which are listed below) must show your name and address. This must be presented to an election judge before being permitted to vote.

      If you do not present a required form on identification, you may vote on a provisional ballot. For further information, please see Provisional Voting below.

      If you registered to vote by mail after January 1, 2003, and you did not submit a copy of the required identification with the registration application at that time, and you will be voting in a jurisdiction for the first time, then you will be required to submit a copy of one of the following:

      • Current and valid photo identification
      • Utility bill
      • Government check
      • Paycheck
      • Government document

      Illinois voters who vote during the early voting period must vote in person and must provide a valid identification. Valid forms of identification for this purpose include a current driver's license, state-issued identification card, or another government-issued identification card.

      ID Needed for Voting?

      A photo ID will be requested of you, but you may sign a simple affidavit.

      Acceptable Federal and State Photo IDs (may be expired within the last five years, unless you are over 65 and then no expiration restrictions apply)

      • Driver's license issued by any state
      • Non-driver's photo ID from any state
      • US Armed Services phtot ID
      • US passport or passport card
      • NH photo ID issued by the DMV for voting purposes only

      Student Photo IDs (no date is required)

      • NH schools including public and private colleges and universities, community colleges and licensed career schools
      • Public high schools and private high schools that are approved by the NH Department of Educations

      Other

      • A photo ID deemed acceptable by a Supervisor of the Checklist, Moderator or Town or City Clerk
      • Verification of a person's identity by a Supervisor of the Checklist, Moderator or Town or City Clerk
      • An affidavit filled out and signed by the voter and an authorized election officer

      If you do not have an approved photo ID you may get a free photo ID for voting purposes only by presenting a voucher from your town/city clerk to any New Hampshire DMV office that issues identification.

      ID Needed for Voting?

      Unless your are a first time voter, you do not need to show any ID to vote a regular ballot on Election Day.

      First time voters are required to show some form of ID, but it does not need to be a photo ID. Acceptable forms of ID are:

      • Pennsylvania driver's license or PENNDOT ID card
      • ID issued by any Commonwealth agency
      • ID issued by the US Government
      • US Passport
      • US armed Forces ID
      • Student ID
      • Employee ID
      • Confirmation issued by the County Voter Registration Office
      • Non-photo ID issued by the Commonwealth that shows name and address
      • Non-photo ID issued by the US Government that shows name and address
      • Firearm permit
      • Current utility bill that shows name and address
      • Current bank statement that shows name and address
      • Current paycheck that shows name and address
      • Government check that shows name and address

      All voters may be asked to show ID at the polls, however, you cannot be stopped from voting a regular ballot if you do not provide a valid ID.

       

      ID Needed for Voting?

      You will be required to show proof of identity at the polling place before receiving a ballot. You will announce your name and place of residence to the election official and present one form of identification that bears your name, address, and photograph or two different forms of identification that bear your name and address. An identification is valid unless it can be determined on its face that it has expired.

      Acceptable forms of identification with photograph, name, and address:

      • Valid Arizona driver's license
      • Valid Arizona non-operating identification license
      • Tribal enrollment card or other form of tribal identification
      • Valid U.S. federal, state, or local government issued ID

      Acceptable forms of identification without a photograph that bear your name and address (two required):

      • Utility bill that is dated within 90 days of the date of the election. A utility bill may be for electric, gas, water, solid waste, sewer, telephone, cellular phone, or cable television
      • Bank or credit union statement that is dated within 90 days of the date of the election
      • Valid Arizona Vehicle Registration
      • Indian census card
      • Property tax statement of your residence
      • Tribal enrollment card or other form of tribal identification
      • Recorder's certificate
      • Valid U.S. federal, state, or local government issued ID, including a voter registration card issued by the county recorder
      • Arizona vihicle insurance
      • Any maining to the elector marked "Official Election Material"

      Other acceptable forms of identification are one identification with name and photo of the elector accompanied by one non-photo identification with name and address.

      • Any valid photo identification from List 1 in which the address does not reasonably match the precinct register accompanied by a non-photo identification from List 2 in which the address does reasonably match the precinct register
      • U.S. Passport without address and one valid item from List 2
      • U.S. Military identification without address and one valid item from List 2

      An identification is valid unless it can be determined on its face that it has expired.

      ID Needed for Voting?

      To vote, you must either present a valid photo ID, or sign an affidavit if no photo ID is available. Acceptable photo ID includes:

      • A Louisiana driver's license
      • A Louisiana special ID card (you can get one for free at the Office of Motor Vehicles by showing your voter information card).
      • Any other generally recognized picture ID card that contains your name and signature

       

      ID Needed for Voting?

      Acceptable forms of identification must include a street address. P.O. Boxes do not establish residency and CANNOT be accepted.

      Acceptable forms of identification are:

      • Driver's license
      • Non-driver's ID card
      • Tribal government issued ID card
      • Student ID certificate (provided by ND college or university)
      • Long-term car ID certificate (provided by ND facility)

      If you are voting absentee, acceptable forms of ID are:

      • Any forms of ID listed above
      • Passport or Military ID - Only for ND residents living outside the US who do not possess one of the other forms of ID
      • Attester - an applicant without acceptable form of ID may use an attester. The attester must provide his or her name, ND drivers license, non-driver's, or tribal ID number and sign the absentee/mail ballot application form to attest to the applicant's ND residency and voting eligibility.
         

      ID Needed for Voting?

      New Voter Photo ID Requirements are in effect. You will be required to show one of the following forms of photo identification at the polling location before you will be permitted to cast a vote.

      • Texas driver license issued by the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS)
      • Texas Election Identification Certificate issued by DPS
      • Texas personal identification card issued by DPS
      • Texas concealed handgun license issued by DPS
      • United States military identification card containing the person’s photograph
      • United States citizenship certificate containing the person’s photograph
      • United States passport

      With the exception of the U.S. citizenship certificate, the identification must be current or have expired no more than 60 days before being presented for voter qualification at the polling place.

      Your photo Identification card does not have to have your current address. The new photo ID requirement makes no determination on voter address matching criteria; therefore, there is no address matching requirement.

      Your name on the ID and the name on the registration do not necessarily need to match exactly. As long as the names are substantially similar, the voter will only have to affirm they are the same person who is registered before voting a normal ballot. Similar but non-matching names might be because of the use of nicknames, suffixes and changes of name due to marriage or divorce.

      If you are not exempt (addressed below) and you do not have any of the above valid photo IDs, you may cast a provisional ballot at the polls. In order for the provisional ballot to count, you must visit the voter registrar's office within six calendar days of the election to either present one of the above forms of ID or submit one of the temporary affidavits (addressed below) in the presence of the county voter registrar while attesting to the fact that you do not have any of the required photo IDs.

      Exemption/Exceptions:

      Voters with a disability may apply with the county voter registrar for a permanent exemption. The application must contain written documentation from either the U.S. Social Security Administration evidencing you have been determined to have a disability, or from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs evidencing a disability rating of at least 50 percent. In addition, you must state that you have no valid form of photo identification. Those who obtain a disability exemption will be allowed to vote by presenting a voter registration certificate reflecting the exemption. Please contact your voter registrar for more details.

      Voters who have a consistent religious objection to being photographed and voters who do not have any valid form of photo identification as a result of certain natural disasters as declared by the President of the United States or the Texas Governor, may vote a provisional ballot, appear at the voter registrar’s office within six (6) calendar days after election day, and sign an affidavit swearing to the religious objection or natural disaster, in order for your ballot to be counted. Please contact your county voter registrar for more details.

      If you vote by mail you do not need a photo Identification. The new requirement does not change the process for voting by mail. However, only specific reasons entitle a registered voter to vote early by mail (no longer called absentee voting). You may request a ballot by mail if you:

      • will be away from your county on Election Day and during early voting;
      • are sick or disabled;
      • are 65 years of age or older on Election Day; or
      • are confined in jail.

      You can get a formal application for a ballot by mail from:

      The Secretary of State’s office

      The Early Voting Clerk in your county; or

      Download an application for a ballot by mail here.

      For more details please go to the Texas Secretary of State voting site

      ID Needed for Voting?

      Identification is required ONLY if you have registered using the National Voter Registration Form and thus did not supply it originally. In that case, the voter must present current identification which includes a current and valid photo ID that shows full name and address. If a photo ID cannot be produced, a current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck or other government document that shows full name and address will be accepted. Identification is also required the first time you vote in person or with an in-person absentee ballot.

      ID Needed for Voting?

      You only need ID to vote if you have not registered before arriving at the polling precinct. You may register to vote at your polling place on Election Day. Options of proof of residence are as follows:

      ID with current name and address:

      • Valid Minnesota driver's license, Minnesota learner's permit, Minnesota ID card or a receipt for any of these
      • Tribal ID card with your name, address, photo and signature

      Photo ID plus a document with current name and address:

      Accepted photo IDs:

      • Driver's license, state ID card or learner's permit issued by any state
      • US passport
      • US military ID card
      • Tribal ID card with name, signature and photo
      • Minnesota university, college or technical college ID card
      • Minnesota high school ID card

      Accepted documents:

      • Residential lease or rental agreement (must be valid through Election Day)
      • Current student fee statement
      • Bill, account or start of service statement due or dated within 30 days of election for: phone, TV, internet services, solid waste or sewer services, electric, gas, water, banking or credit card, rent or mortgage payments

      Registered voter who can confirm your name and address:

      A registered voter from your precinct can go with you to your polling place to sign an oath confirming your address. One registered voter can vouch for up to eight others

      College student ID - if a student housing list was provided:

      College students can use a student photo ID card if their college provided a student housing list to election officials.

      Valid registration in same precinct:

      If you were previously registered in the precinct but changed names or moved within the same precinct, you only need to tell the elections official your previous name or address. You are not required to provide any additional documentation.

      Notice of late registration:

      If you registered to vote too close to Election Day, you may have received a Notice of Late Registration in the mail. This notice can be used to register on Election Day.

      Staff person of a residential facility:

      If you live in a residential facility, a facility staff person can go with you to the polls to confirm your address.

      ID Needed for Voting?

      All voters are required to show photo ID or sign a Personal Identification Affidavit to cast a regular ballot. Acceptable forms of ID include:

      • An Idaho driver's license or photo Identification Card
      • A U.S. passport or Federal photo identification card
      • A current student photo ID, issued by an Idaho high school or post secondary education institution.
      • A tribal photo identification card.

      NOTE: The name on the ID must match the name on the registration list in the poll book but common abbreviations and nicknames are acceptable.

      ID Needed for Voting?

      Identification is necessary at the polls if you have not shown your ID when you registered. This is only required the first time you vote. Identification must show proof of residence, proof of identity and a picture is required. Examples of recommended identification include a driver's license or any government issued ID. If the current photo identification does not include the voters current address please bring, a copy of a current utility bill, bank statemet, government check, or other government document that shows voter's name and current residence address is required.

      ID Needed for Voting?

      ID is required, however photo ID is not required. Acceptable forms of ID include a personal acquaintance of the precinct officer, or a document such as a driver's license, Social Security card, or credit card or another form of ID containing both a picture and a signature.

      ID Needed for Voting?

      Identification is only required if you are a first time voter whose identification data did not match when you registered to vote. These voters will be notified by mail of the required ID needed, such as:

      • A current NC driver's license
      • Any other government issued photo ID
      • A utility bill, pay-stub, W-2, bank statement or a document from a government agency that shows your name and current address

        ID Needed for Voting?

        A photo ID is required when you vote. All voters must present an ID containing the voter's name and photograph when voting at the polls, whether voting early or on Election Day. Any of the following IDs may be used, even if expired:

        • Tennessee drivers license with your photo
        • United States Passport
        • Photo ID issued by the Tennessee Department of Safety and Homeland Security
        • Photo ID issued by the federal or Tennessee state government
        • United States Military photo ID
        • State-issued handgun carry permit with your photo

        IDs that are not acceptable:

        • College student IDs and photo IDs not issued by the federal or Tennessee state government

        Who is exempt?

        • Voters who vote absentee by mail
        • Voters who are residents of a licensed nursing home or assissted living center and who vote at the facility
        • Voters who are hospitalized
        • Voters with a religious objection to being photographed
        • Voters who are indigent and unable to obtain a photo ID without paying a fee

        If you do not have a photo ID you may obtain a free photo ID from the Department of Safety and Homeland Security at a driver service center. You will need proof of citizenship (such as a birth certificate), two proofs of Tenessee residency (such as a voter registration card, utility bill, vehicle registration/title, or bank statement), and if your name differs from that on your primary ID, proof of the changed name (such as a certified marriage certificate, divorce decree, certified court order, etc.). If you do not have a photo on your driver's license and no other form of valid photo ID, you may visit a driver service center to have your photo added to your license for free upon request.

        If you do not bring a valid photo ID to the polling place you may vote a provisional ballot. You will then have two business days after Election Day to return to the election commission office to show a valid ID.

        For more information visit the Tennessee Secretary of State website.

        ID Needed for Voting?

        No form of identification (including a registration card,) needs to be shown at the polls when voting. You are only required to show identification when registering to vote.

        Wyoming allows qualified voters to register at the polls on Election Day by bringing an acceptable form of ID to the polls:

        • Wyoming driver's license
        • A different state's driver's license
        • An ID card issued by a local, state or federal agency
        • A U.S. passport
        • School ID
        • Military ID

        You can also show two of the following in any combination:

        • Certification of U.S. citizenship
        • Certificate of naturalization
        • Draft record
        • Voter registration card from another state or county
        • Original or certified copy of a birth certificate bearing an official seal
        • Certification of birth abroad issued by the department of state
        • Any other form of identification issued by an official agency

        ID Needed for Voting?

        You must either show identification or sign a one line affidavit at the polling place if you have not provided proper identification when registering. A photo ID is not required. Acceptable forms of ID at the polling place are:

        • A Social Security card
        • Any other preprinted form of identification that shows your name and address, name and signature, or name and photograph.

        If you do not have identification, the affidavit form requires your name, residential address, date of birth, and signature. The affidavit states, under penalty of false statement, that you are the one whose name appears on the official checklist.

        First time voters who registered to vote by mail and did not provide acceptable ID at registration must show identification at the polls or with their absentee ballots. Acceptable forms of identification include a copy of a current and valid photo ID or a copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or government document that shows your name and address. If you are a first time voter, you will be required to present identification and may not use the secretary of state's affidavit in lieu of acceptable ID.

        ID Needed for Voting?

        All voters are requested to show an acceptable form of photo identification at the polls. Your photo ID does not need to have your address on it. In addition, the name on your identification card may be a shorter form of your name. For example, Bill for William and Kathy for Katherine are acceptable. After showing your photo ID to the poll worker and signing the application, you may cast your ballot. Acceptable photo ID includes:

        • Driver's license or personal ID card issued by another state
        • Federal or state government-issued photo ID
        • U.S. passport
        • Military identification card with photo
        • Student identification with photo from a high school or an accredited institution of higher education
        • Tribal identification card with photo

        Voters without photo ID: Michigan election law anticipates that not all voters will have photo ID. Voters who do not have acceptable photo ID or forgot to bring acceptable photo ID to the polls can vote like any other voter by signing an affidavit. Questions regarding the voter identification requirement can be directed to your local city or township clerk's office.

        If you do not have a driver's license or other acceptable photo identification, you can get a state identification card at your local Secretary of State branch office for $10. State ID cards are free to individuals who are 65 or older or who are blind. Cards are also free to those who have had driving privileges terminated due to a physical or mental disability. Proof of identiy and residencey are requred when applying for a state ID card. Visit this site for details on what forms are acceptable in order to prive identity and residency, or call 888-767-6424.

        ID Needed for Voting?

        ID is only required if you use an audiovisual unit at a voting center. Acceptable forms of ID for voting include:

        • Photo ID, such as a driver's license, state ID card, student ID card, or tribal ID card
        • Voter registration card
        • Utility Bill
        • Bank statement
        • Paycheck
        • Government check
        • Other government document

        A voter who does not have ID may vote a provisional ballot.

        ID Needed for Voting?

        A picture ID is needed for verification of your identity at the polls. You will be asked to sign a poll book to record that you voted at that polling place. Your voter registration notice is not an acceptable form of identification.

        ID Needed for Voting?

        Identification is required if you are a first-time voter who registered by mail and did not provide verification with your registration application. Please check with your local election officials to determine what form of ID is needed at the polls.

        ID Needed for Voting?

        You will need to show your signed voter ID card, or any other signed ID that will allow the election worker to verify your signature. Examples include your driver's license, military ID, Indian ID, fish and game license, state ID card, passport, or senior citizen ID card. A picture ID is not necessary.

        ID Needed for Voting?

        Voters must show photo ID when casting a vote. Acceptable forms of ID include:

        • A driver's license or nondriver's ID card issued by Kansas, or by another state or district in of the U.S.
        • A concealed carry of handgun license issued by Kansas, or a concealed carry of handgun or weapon license issued by another state or district of the U.S.
        • A U.S. passport
        • An employee badge or ID document issued by a municipal, county, state, or federal government office or agency
        • A military ID issued by the U.S.
        • A student ID card issued by an accredited postsecondary institution of education in the state of Kansas.
        • A public assistance ID card issued by a municipal, county, state, or federal government office or agency.
        • An ID card issued by an Indian tribe

        Photo ID is also required for early voting and absentee voting. EXCEPTIONS AVAILABLE: Persons over 65 may use expired documentation as proof of identity.

        FREE ID: ID cards for persons over 17 years old are free if the applicant signs an affidavit attesting that the ID is needed for purposes of voting in Kansas and that the applicant does not possess any other form of identification qualifying as acceptable ID for voting. The applicant must also produce evidence that he/she is a registered voter in Kansas. Find that affidavit here. Unique among the states, Kansas provides free birth certificates to persons born in Kansas if needed to acquire a photo ID for voting.

        ID Needed for Voting?

        If you are a new voter who is registering by mail, you will be required to show identification when you go to vote for the first time. If you are already registered at the board of elections or a state agency, you should not have to show identification at the polls. It is advisable for all new voters to bring identification when voting for the first time. Acceptable IDs to to vote are:

        • Passport
        • Government ID card
        • Military ID card
        • Student ID card
        • Public housing ID card
        • Any ID specified by HAVA and New York State law as acceptable
        • Utility bill
        • Bank statement
        • Paycheck
        • Government check (Social Security, tax refund, military paycheck or paycheck stub)
        • Other government documents with your name and address including but not limited to: voter registration card, hunting, fishing, or trapping license or firearm permit.

        ID Needed for Voting?

        You must show one of the following forms of ID at the polls when you go to vote:

        • A South Dakota driver's license or non-driver ID card
        • A passport or an identification card, including a picture, issued by an agency of the U.S. government
        • A tribal identification card, including a picture
        • US Government photo ID
        • US Armed Forces ID
        • Student photo ID from a South Dakota high school
        • A current ID that includes a picture, issued by an accredited institution of higher education, including a university, college, or technical school, located within South Dakota

        If you do not have a photo ID, you can sign a personal ID affidavit.

        ID Needed for Voting?

        All voters must show a photo ID in order to vote. Acceptable forms of ID are:

        • A Wisconsin DOT-issued drivers license
        • A Wisconsin DOT-issued ID card
        • A military ID card issued by a US uniformed service
        • US passport book or card
        • Certificate of naturalization that was issued less than two years before Election Day
        • Unexpired driving receipt issued by Wisconsin DOT
        • ID card issued by a federally recognized Indian tribe in Wisconsin
        • Unexpired ID card issued by a Wisconsin-accredited university or college that contains the following: Date of issuance, student signature and an expiration date no more than two years after date of issuance. All students must also provide a proof of enrollment with the ID.

        The photo ID does not have to have your current address.

        Voters without any of the above forms of ID may apply for a free ID card from the Wisconsin DOT. In order to get a free ID card you must:

        • Be a US citizen
        • Be at least 17 years old
        • Indicate on the application that the ID card is required free of charge for the purposes of voting
        • Claim that documents required to prove US Citizenship, name and date of birth and/or legal name change are unavailable and require a fee to a government agency to obtain.

        You can apply for a free ID card at the Wisconsin DOT website.

        ID Needed for Voting?

        If you are voting by mail for the first time you may need to provide a photocopy of your identification with your ballot. Voters who recently registered for the first time and are voting by mail are required to provide a photocopy of their identification.

        When voting in person you will need one of the following types of identification:

        • A valid Colorado driver's license
        • A valid identification card issued by the Colorado Department of Revenue
        • A valid U.S. passport
        • A valid employee identification card with a photograph of the eligible elector issued by any branch, department, agency, or entity of the U.S. government or Colorado, or by any Colorado county, municipality, board, authority, or other political subdivision of this state
        • A valid pilot's license issued by the Federal Aviation Administration or other authorized agency of the United States
        • A valid U.S. military identification card with photograph of the elector
        • A copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or other government document that shows the name and address of the elector. A cable bill, a telephone bill, documentation from a public institution of higher education in Colorado containing at least the name, date of birth, and residence address of the student elector, or a paycheck from a government institution are also sufficient forms of identification
        • A valid Medicare or Medicaid card
        • A certified copy of a U.S. birth certificate
        • Certified documentation of naturalization
        • A valid student identification card with a photograph of the eligible elector issued by an institute of higher education in Colorado.
        • A valid veteran identification card issued by the United States department of veterans affairs veterans health administration with a photograph of the eligible election
        • A valid identification card issued by a federally recognized tribal government certifying tribal membership

        A Social Security number (or last four digits) is NOT a legal form of identification for voting in person.

        ID Needed for Voting?

        If you registered to vote by mail on or after January 1, 2003, you will be required to show identification when you vote for the first time in a federal election.

        If you provide your driver's license number or the last four digits of your Social Security number on the voter registration form and those numbers are verified, you will not have to provide identification when you register to vote or at the polls. If you do not provide those numbers or if they cannot be verified (the acknowledgement of your voter registration that you receive in the mail will notify you) then you have to provide identification either at town or city hall prior to the election or at the polls when you vote. Identification must have your name and current address. Acceptable forms of identification including any of the following:

        • Current and valid photo identification
        • Government check or official document
        • Current utility bill
        • Paycheck or stub

        ID Needed for Voting?

        Oregon has a vote by mail process. Instead of using traditional polling places where voters go to cast ballots on Election Day, a ballot is mailed to each registered voter.

        You will need to sign the return envelope of your ballot. Your signature will be matched with your voter registration card to verify your identity.

        ID Needed for Voting?

        As of July 1, 2014 voters must show one of the following forms of photo ID at the polls:

        • Virginia Driver's License or other photo ID issued by Virginia
        • US Passport
        • Any photo ID issued by the US Government
        • Student ID that has a photograph and that was issued by any institution of higher learning in Virginia
        • Employee ID card that has a photograph and that was issued by the employer in the ordinary course of business

        Please note:

        • Your address on your photo ID does not have to match the address on your voter registration
        • You can use and ID that does not have an expiration date, but if your ID does have an expiration date, it cannot be used if it expired more than 12 months before the election
        • Your name on the ID must match your name on the voter registration rolls. If your name has changed, you can get a free photo ID from the state with your new name. You can check to see if your name matches by cheking your state resource.

        If you do not have a photo ID you can get a free voter identification card from any county registrar, whichever is most convenient for you. You will need to fill out the Voter Photo Identification Applicaltion, get your photo taken and give the registrar your electronic signature. Your photo ID card will be mailed within 7-10 days.

        If you apply for a photo ID card less than 21 days before the next election, you will receive a temporary ID in the registrar's office that is valid for 30 days. You will still receive your permanent ID through the mail. 

        ID Needed for Voting?

        When you arrive at your polling place, you will be required to present one of the following forms of identification:

        • A Georgia driver's license, even if it is expired
        • A photo ID issued by a state or federal government agency
        • A valid U.S. passport
        • An employee ID card containing your photograph and issued by any branch, department, agency, or entity of the U.S. government, Georgia, or any county, municipality, board, authority, or other entity of Georgia
        • A valid U.S. military ID card
        • A valid tribal ID card.
        • If you do not have one of the above forms of ID, the State of Georgia offers a free Voter Identification Card.

        If you are unable to show identification at the time of voting you may cast a provisional ballot which will be counted only if you present identification within the two day period following the election. For more information on the acceptable forms of photo ID and the free Voter Identification Card, please visit your state's resource.

        ID Needed for Voting?

        You must present ID when voting. When you enter your polling place, an election judge will greet you, ask your name, and confirm that you are registered to vote in that precinct. He or she will then ask you to show ID. This can be any current photo ID that shows your name (for example, a valid driver's license, school ID, state ID, or tribal ID) or a current utility bill, bank statement, paycheck, voter confirmation notice, government check or other government document that shows your name and current address.

        If you do not have any of these forms of ID, you can still vote by requesting and filling out a Polling Place Elector ID form. Or you can vote a provisional ballot.

        Registration Deadline

        In person registration is available at the polls on Election Day.

        Not registered? Use our registration tool to fill out your application!

        The mail in voter registration deadline is the 20th day before the election. You can use the Mail in Voter registration form to register by mail. Contact your municipal clerk's office for more details.

        Registration Deadline

        You can register to vote:

        • Anytime in person at a county voter registration office or Voter Service and Polling Center, including Election Day
        • No later than 22 days before an election by mail or through a driver's license or other state agency, or through a Voter Registration Drive
        • No later than 8 days before an election online at www.govotecolorado.com

        Registration Deadline

        You must register to vote at least 20 days before an election, 10 days before a special town meeting.

        Not registered? Use our registration tool to fill out your application!

        Registration Deadline

        Not registered? Use our registration tool to fill out your application!

        You must register to vote for an upcoming election at least 21 days before that election. You can also change or select party affiliation up to 21 days before the election.

        Registration Deadline

        The registration deadline to vote in the general election is 22 days before the election. If there is a special election the registration deadline is 13 days before the election and if the Governor calls an election the deadline is 7 days.

        To verify your voter registration status please use your state's voter verification tool.

        Not registered? Use our registration tool to fill out your application!

         

        Registration Deadline

        The registration deadline for the December 4, 2012 Special Election is October 9, 2012.

        The voter registration deadline is thirty days prior to the election. Mail in registration must be postmarked by this deadline to be eligible to vote in the upcoming elections. You are required to notify the board of registrars of your county of residence whenever you move.

        If you move within the same county in which you are registered to vote and do not notify the registrar at least 30 days prior to an election, you may vote in your old polling place for that election. You must file a notice of your new address. This can be done by writing your county board of registrars, or by submitting a new voter registration application. If you move outside the county in which you are registered to vote in excess of 30 days prior to an election, you have lost your eligibility to vote in the county of your old residence. You must reregister to vote in your new county of residence. If you do not reregister to vote by the deadline, you cannot vote in that particular election.

        Registration Deadline

        Regular registration closes at 5pm 30 days before election day. Voters can late-register at the county election offive beginning 29 days through the close of the polls on election day.

        Registration Deadline

        Voter registration closes ten days before an election.

        Not registered? Use our registration tool to fill out your application!

        Registration Deadline

        In person registration is available at the polls on election day.

        Not registered? Use our registration tool to fill out your application!

        You may register in person on Election Day if you could not register earlier. If you choose to register by mail, the form must be postmarked 15 days before an election, A registration form postmarked at least 15 days before an election will be accepted for that election even if it is received after the deadline to register to vote. Registration is permanent. After you register, you do not have to register again unless you move.

        In person voter registration deadline is ON Election Day at the polls. Be sure to bring the correct Voter ID to the polls if you choose this option.

        Registration Deadline

        Voter registration closes 28 days prior to an election. Hand-delivered voter registrations should be taken directly to the county clerk and may be delivered until the Friday after the close of registration. Registration is permanent in New Mexico as long as you do not move, change your name or party affiliation.

        Registration Deadline

        You must be registered 30 days prior to Election Day. Registration by mail applications must be postmarked at least 30 days prior to that particular election to be eligible.

        There is no length of residency requirement in South Carolina in order to register to vote.

        Registration Deadline

        Not registered? Use our registration tool to fill out your application!

        The registration deadline is 21 days before the election. For more information contact your local board of elections.

        Registration Deadline

        Not registered? Use our registration tool to fill out your application!

        In California, the deadline to register to vote for an election is 15 days before each local and statewide Election Day. For more information on California's registration deadline, please visit your state's website.

        Registration Deadline

        Not registered? Use our registration tool to fill out your application!

        The voter registration application must be received by a Maryland election office no later than 9 p.m., 21 days before an election. If your application is complete and you are found to be qualified, a Voter Notification Card will be mailed to you. You are not registered until you receive your Voter Notification Card.

        Registration Deadline

        Not registered? Use our registration tool to fill out your application!

        You may submit your voter registration application form at any time. However, voter identification cards cannot be issued during the 24 days prior to an election. A valid application must therefore be postmarked or delivered to either a motor license agency or designated voter registration agency more than 24 days prior to an election in order for you to participate in the election.

        Registration Deadline

        Not registered? Use our registration tool to fill out your application!

        In order to be eligible to vote in a particular election, your application for addition to the checklist must be received by 5:00pm the Wednesday before the day of the election. The town and city clerks' offices must be open at least from 10:00 am to 12:00 pm on this Monday. If you apply through the department of motor vehicles (DMV) or another voter registration agency, your application must be postmarked or accepted before the second Monday before the election.

        Registration Deadline

        You can apply to register to vote at any time. However, to vote in an election, you must be registered in the state by the book closing date, which is 29 days before each election. You may pre-register to vote if you are 17 years old or have received a valid Florida driver's license, whichever occurs earlier.

        • Note: To vote in a Florida election you must be registered for at least 29 days prior to the election date. If you prefer to vote during the time designated for early voting, you must be registered for 29 days by this time or you will not be able to vote at that time.

         

        Registration Deadline

        Not registered? Use our registration tool to fill out your application!

        In order to be registered to vote in an election, you need to be registered by 5:00 p.m., or the normal close of business of any public building where registration is allowed, whichever is later, on the fourth Wednesday prior to the election. If you register after such time, you are registered to vote in subsequent elections.

        Registration Deadline

        The deadline to register to vote is 29 days before the election. Certain military voters and their family members may have until 12:00 pm on Election Day.

        Registration Deadline

        Not registered? Use our registration tool to fill out your application!

        The registration deadline to vote is 21 days prior to Election Day.

        Evening registration is available please check with your in the commissioner of registration for dates and times.

        Registration forms are also available in various State agencies and at Division of Motor Vehicle offices and can be obtained while transacting agency business.

        Registration Deadline

        You must be registered 30 days before an election to vote in a municipal or state election.

        To vote in a Presidential election, you may register and vote on Election Day at designated polling places, but you may only vote for the offices of the President and Vice President, not in state, local or other federal races.

        Not registered? Use our registration tool to fill out your application!

         

        Registration Deadline

        To qualify to vote in the election, you must apply to register to vote 30 days before the election. If you mail the form, it must be postmarked by that date. You may also present it to a voter registration agency representative or your county clerk, by that date. If you completed your application at a voter registration drive, the organizers must submit it to the county clerk or secretary of state's office within 21 days of the date on the application or no later than 30 days prior to the election.

        If you submit your application close to an election registration deadline, you are strongly advised to follow up on your registration status with your county clerk before Election Day. If an election deadline is approaching, you can ensure your eligibility by applying in person with your county clerk. If you have not received verification from your county clerk, be sure to confirm your registration before Election Day.

        You can register to vote at any of the following places:

        • County clerk's office in your home county
        • State revenue Office
        • Driver services (pick up a paper form or ask for your information to be transmitted electronically)
        • Public library or Arkansas state library
        • Public assistance agency
        • Disability agency
        • Military recruitment office

        Registration Deadline

        You may register in person on Election Day.

        Not registered? Use our registration tool to fill out your application!

        To register by mail, you must do so 21 days before Election Day. However, you are able to register in person up until and on Election Day. When registering in person 21 days before an election, or on Election Day, you must show proof of identity and residency.

        Registration Deadline

        The registration deadline is 30 days before the election.

        Registration Deadline

        Voter registration forms must be postmarked at least 30 days before an election in order to vote in the upcoming election. You may register in person at a satellite registration site or at the county clerk's office from 8:00 am to 8:00 pm 15 days or more before a primary or general election. Or you may deliver your registration form in person to the county clerk at least 8 days before the election.

        Voter registration is valid for life, unless you move, change your name, or wish to affiliate with a different party. To change your voter registration status for any of the above reasons, simply fill out a new voter registration forms.

        Registration Deadline

        Applications must be postmarked 30 days before the election. You can register at the polls on Election Day if you bring one of the following items:

        • Current and valid government issued photo identification card with your address
        • Current lease or utility bill with your address
        • Bank statement with your address
        • Government issued check with your address
        • Paycheck/stub with your name and address
        • Other government issued document that shows your name and address

         

        Registration Deadline

        Not registered? Use our registration tool to fill out your application!

        Mail in registration applications must be postmarked 30 days prior to the election.

        In person registration at the county clerk's office must be done at least 30 days prior to the election in which you want to vote. In most cases, circuit clerks and municipal clerks are available to register voters between 8:00 am and 5:00 pm.

        Registration Deadline

        Registration is open year round except:

        • During the 27-day period just prior to an election
        • During the 2-days after each election (1 day after in Chicago)

        As of February 2006, grace period registration is available in Illinois. The grace period for registering to vote is the 27th to the 3rd day prior to the election. After the normal registration period closes, grace period registration allows you to register in person at the office of your election authority. However, people who take advantage of the late registration opportunity are limited in the way they can vote: if you register to vote during this two-week period you must vote in the office of the election authority or vote absentee by mail. There are 110 election authorities in Illinois, most of them county clerks, and the others are boards established by larger cities. The people who register during the grace period do not vote at their polling place on Election Day, nor are they allowed to vote under the new Illinois law that establishes early voting centers.

        Under federal law, citizens may apply to register to vote by mailing in an a voter registration application. The applications are available at some public and private facilities where you live. Applications may also be downloaded from the Illinois State Board of Elections website.

        When you register by mail, your form must be postmarked prior to the close of registration. Please note that if you register by mail, with the exception of those disabled or in the military, you must vote in-person at the polling place or by in-person absentee voting the first time you vote.

        As of July 2014, voters may now register to vote either by accessing the Online Voter Application, or through the Illinois State Board of Elections website

        Registration Deadline

        In person registration is available at the polls on election day.

        If you would like to be listed in the registration database before Election Day, your registration form must be received by your local Board of Elections 10 days before Election Day. Your registration will be valid either way.

        Not registered? Use our registration tool to fill out your application!

        Registration Deadline

        The deadlines for registering is 30 days before each election. For more information contact your local board of elections. Print your registration form here.

        Registration Deadline

        The registration deadline is 29 days before an election.

        Registration Deadline

        Louisiana statutes require you to be registered 30 days prior to an election to be eligible to vote in that particular election.

        Registration Deadline

        There is no voter registration.

        Registration Deadline

        There is no length of residency requirement before registering to vote in Texas. To vote in an upcoming election, the properly completed voter registration form must be postmarked 30 days before the upcoming election to be valid. In person registration must also be completed 30 days before an election.

        You may request a postage-paid application by filling out the application form. A voter registration application will be mailed to you soon after. You must mail the voter registration application to the voter registrar in your county of residence. You may also pick up a voter registration application at many post offices, libraries, Texas department of public safety offices, or Texas department of human services offices throughout the state.

        If you moved within the same county where you are currently registered, you must file the new address information in writing with your voter registrar or you may submit the in county change online. If you miss this deadline, you may return to your old precinct to vote, but you will be required to complete a statement of residence confirming your new address in your new precinct.

        If you moved to a new county, you must re-register in your new county of residence to be eligible to vote in the election. If you miss this deadline, you may be eligible to vote a limited ballot. A limited ballot is available only during the early voting period. The limited ballot application will also act as a voter registration application. Contact your county voter registration official for more information.

        If you are a student who spends several weeks or months a year in different locations, but you want to vote in Texas, you will need to decide which place in Texas is the geographic location you consider to be your permanent home. This location should be where you intend to return after any temporary absence. When you are describing your residence on the voter application, you are making a factual statement to the best of your knowledge and belief. You are presumed under Texas law to be in the best position to make a factual determination concerning where your residence is for registration purposes. However, you cannot register in more than one location; if you register in one county but put another Texas county as your home on the application, your application will be forwarded to the Texas county of your residence.

        Registration Deadline

        Not registered? Use our registration tool to fill out your application!

        The voter registration deadline for the general election is 20 days before the Primary or General Election. Overseas citizens and military members have until the third Monday before Election Day.

        Note: You may register to vote anytime before the fourth Sunday before a presidential primary, non-presidential primary or general election. You may change your political party affiliation except during the closed period of each primary or presidential primary election.

        Registration Deadline

        In person registration is available at the polls on election day.

        If you want you name to appear in the books at your polling place on Election Day, you must register 20 days before the election.

        You may also register online though the Secretary of State website. You must complete the online registration 20 days before the election.

        Not registered? Use our registration tool to fill out your application!

        Registration Deadline

        You may register to vote at your polling place on Election Day.

        You must register with your County Clerk or official registrar 25 days before any election. Voters are required to provide their driver's license number when registering, or if they do not have a driver's license, provide the last four digits of their social security number.

        Any elector may register by mail for any election if postmarked no later than 25 days prior to an election.

        Any person who is qualified to vote may register at the polls on election day by providing proof of residence. All documents used in providing proof of residence must be accompanied with a photo ID. Acceptable documents include:

        • A valid Idaho driver's license issued through the Department of Transportation.
        • A valid Idaho identification card issued through the Department of Transportation
        • Any document which contains a valid address in the precinct together with a picture identification card
        • A current valid student photo ID and a fee statement with an address in the precinct.

        Not registered? Use our registration tool to fill out your application!

        Registration Deadline

        You can register to vote in person up to 21 days before the election. All mailed registration applications must be postmarked 31 days before an election.

        Not registered? Use our registration tool to fill out your application!

        Registration Deadline

        Your completed voter registration card must be mailed or returned at least 28 days prior to the election.

        Registration Deadline

        Voter registration forms must be either postmarked or delivered in person by 5 pm 25 days before Election Day.

        Not registered? Use our registration tool to fill out your application.

        Registration Deadline

        You must register 30 days prior to the election. Registration in person depends on the office hours of each county elections office.

        Registration Deadline

        In person registration is available at the polls on Election Day.

        Not registered? Use our registration tool to fill out your application!

        To be on your state's voter registration database before Election Day, you must register 30 days prior to the election date. You can download the application and either mail or bring it into the county clerk's office. If you register at the county clerk's office during the period 29 days up to Election Day you cannot vote in that election. If you cannot register more than 30 days prior to election, you should wait to register at the polls on Election Day.

        Registration Deadline

        The registration deadline by mail is 14 days before an election, and 5 days before a primary. The in-person registration deadline for a primary election is noon the day before the primary. The in-person general election deadline to register is 7 days before a general election.

        People who become US citizens or turn 18 after the in-person registration deadline may register in-person by noon on Election Day, as long as they show proof of these circumstances to their registrar's office.

        Not registered? Use our registration tool to fill out your application!

        Registration Deadline

        Registration Deadlines are at least 30 days before an election (mail in registrations must be postmarked 30 days prior to an election). You should register to vote at your local clerk's office, with the county clerk or by visiting any Secretary of State branch office. In addition, the following state agencies offer voter registration services to their clients: the Department of Human Services, the Department of Community Health and the Department of Career Development. Military recruitment centers also provide voter registration services.

        Whenever you move to a new city or township, you must re-register to vote. If you move within a city or township, you must update your address. This can be handled through your local clerk, at a Secretary of State branch office, by mail or at any other location where voter registrations are accepted. Michigan voters must use the same residential address for voter registration and driver's license purposes. Consequently, if you submit a driver's license address change, it will be applied to your voter registration. Similarly, if you submit a voter registration address change, it will be applied to your driver's license.

        Registration Deadline

        Not registered? Use our registration tool to fill out your application!

        The in person voting registration deadline for the general election is 8 days before the election. Mail in registration must be postmarked 29 days before the election.

        Registration Deadline

        The registration deadline is 30 days before the election.

        Registration Deadline

        Not registered? Use our registration tool to fill out your application!

        Mail in registrations must be mailed and postmarked on or before the third Friday before an election. You can register in person at the County Clerk/Election Commissioner's office before 6pm on the second Friday before an election

        Registration Deadline

        The registration deadline is 30 days before an election.

        Alaska law allows for same day voter registration for the purposes of voting for President and Vice President of the United States. You may vote a questioned ballot at any polling place, vote an in-person absentee ballot at an absentee voting location or vote by mail.

        Registration Deadline

         

        Not registered? Use our registration tool to fill out your application!

        The deadline to register to vote by mail or in person is 21 days before the election.

        Registration Deadline

        You can register any time during the year, your form must be delivered or mailed at least 25 days before the next election for it to be effective for that election. Please contact the New York State Board of Elections for specific times and locations.

        Not registered? Use our registration tool to fill out your application!

        Registration Deadline

        Not registered? Use our registration tool to fill out your application!

        The deadline for registration is 15 days before any election. Your card must be received by the auditor by this deadline if you are to vote in the next election.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please contact your registrar's office.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please visit your state's voter registration verification tool.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please use your state's voter verification tool.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please contact your elections office or board of elections for your county, city or state.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please check your state's resource.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please utilize your state resource.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, use your state's registration tool, or contact your local county election officer

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please use your state's voter verification tool or contact your local board of elections.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your registration status, please utilize your state resource. For more information contact your county auditor's office.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please utilize your state resource. For more information contact your board of elections.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify registration status click here.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please contact your local board of elections for your county, city or state.

        Verify Voter Registration

        You can view your voter registration status by using the Oregon Secretary of State's online Voter Registration Lookup.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status please use your state's voter verification tool.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please use your state's voter verification tool.

        If you have misplaced or have not received your precinct card within two to three weeks of submitting your voter registration application, please contact your county board of registrars to request a new precinct card or to check the status of your application.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please utilize your state resource.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please use your state resource or your elections office or board of elections for your county , or your local League of Women Voters.

        Once your application has been processed by your local board of registrars, you should receive an acknowledgement from the registrars indicating the status of your application. This acknowledgement will usually be a voter identification card confirming that you are registered to vote. However, if your application was incomplete, you may receive a letter requesting additional information to complete your application.

         

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please click here or contact your elections office or board of elections for your county, city or state.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please use your state's resource or contact your county clerk's office for your county, city or state.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status please use your state's voter verification tool.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration you can use your state's resource or contact your local board of elections.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please contact your elections office for your county, city or state.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, you can utilize your state's resource. Registration is permanent as long as you continue to live in Maryland and keep your name and address current with your local board of elections. You do not have to reregister when you move within the State, but you must keep your address current.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please contact your board of elections.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please contact your local town clerk's office. You can also locate your local town clerk by calling 1-800-439-VOTE.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please utilize your state resource.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please check your state's resource.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status please use your state's voter verification tool.

        For additional information, please contact your elections office or board of elections for your county, city or state.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please utilize your state resource. For more information contact your local elections official.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please use your state's voter verification tool.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please use your state's voter verification tool here.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please contact your municipal elections office.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please use your state's voter verification tool. For additional information, please contact your elections office or board of elections for your county, city or state.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please contact your county clerk's office.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status please click here or contact your local board of elections.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your registration status, contact your voter registrars' office.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please please use your state's resource.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please contact your town or city clerk.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please utilize your state resource. For more information contact your local elections registration official.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please contact your county recorder.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To see if your voter registration status is inactive, please use your state resource. This resource will tell voters if their registration is currently listed as inactive. If you have moved since the last time you voted, please re-register by the registration deadline. If your address has not changed from the last time you registered, you are eligible to vote, but will be asked to confirm your address when voting.

        To verify your voter registration status, please contact your local election's official.

        Verify Voter Registration

        There is no voter registration.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please utilize your state's registration tool.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please contact your elections office or board of elections for your county, city or state.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, use your states resource or contact your county elections office.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, you can utilize your state's verification tool.

        Re-registration is required if registration is canceled for the following reasons:

        • The voter failed to vote at least once at any primary or general election during the four years following registration.
        • An elector changes his residence to another residence.
        • An elector has a name change.

        Verify Voter Registration

        You can verify your voter registration status by utilizing your state's tool.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, use your state registration tool, or contact your local board of elections.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please use your state's voter verification tool.

        For further information, please contact your elections office or board of elections for your county, city or state.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please use your state's voter verification tool.

        Verify Voter Registration

        To verify your voter registration status, please contact your county clerk.

        Vote by Mail

        Colorado voters now have the option to vote by mail. All registered voters will receive mail ballots. The ballot is then voted and must be received by the county clerk and recorder no later than 7pm on Election Day. Postmarks do not count. Voters are encouraged to drop off their ballots at designated drop off sites or mail the ballot in time to be received by the 7pm deadline. Contact your county clerk and recorder for drop-off locations.

        Voters still have the option to vote at the polls. You may surrender your mail ballot when you vote in person. Contact your county clerk and recorder for information about your polling center.

        Vote by Mail

        Oregon has a vote by mail process. Instead of using traditional polling places where voters go to cast ballots on Election Day, a ballot is mailed to each registered voter. The ballot is then voted and returned to the county election office to be counted. In Oregon, ballots will be mailed any time between 14 to 18 days before the election. After it is voted, the ballot may be mailed or hand-delivered to the county election office. In order to be counted, the ballot must be received by the county election office or designated drop site no later than 8:00 pm on Election Day. Postmarks do not count. If you are a registered voter, your ballot will be automatically sent to you. You can call 1-866-ORE-VOTES or contact your county election office to make sure your vote was received.You will need to sign the return envelope of your ballot. Your signature will be matched with your voter registration card to verify your identity.

        List of dropboxes.

        Vote by Mail

        Washington State votes by mail. Your ballot is mailed to you at least 18 days before each election. In order to receive your ballot your voter registration address must be current. You can update your address online with MyVote.

        Your ballot packet will include a ballot, a secrecy envelope and a return envelope. If you need a replacement ballot contact your county election officials.

        The ballot must be

        • Postmarked no later than Election day; or
        • Returned to a designated ballot drop box by 8pm on Election Day; or
        • Returned in person to your county elections department by 8pm on Election Day

        If you fail to sign the ballot declaration, or the signature on the ballot declaration does not match the signature in your voter registration record, your county elections department will contact you.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        You can fill out an absentee ballot request form here or any registered voter may apply in writing to the County Clerk to receive an absentee ballot. The application must give the name of the elector, residence address in Idaho, and mailing address to which the ballot is to be forwarded. The mail-in application shall be signed personally by the applicant and be received by the County Clerk no later than the sixth day before the election.

        In person voting at the absentee elector's polling place ends at 5:00 p.m. on the Friday before the election.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        All registered voters may request to vote by mail. To request an absentee ballot, complete the Absentee Ballot Request Form and submit to the County Clerk in the county where you are registered to vote. All absentee ballots must be received by 7pm on Election Day in order to be counted.

        If you are voting for the first time by mail, you must provide a copy of an acceptable form of ID either with your registration application or absentee ballot request form. Accepable forms of ID are:

        • Current Nevada driver's license
        • Current Nevada State ID Card
        • Rent receipt with pre-printed address
        • Bank statement or pre-printed check
        • Credit card statement
        • Car registration or proof of insurance
        • Government document (tax bill, income info.)
        • Current utility bill

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can find information on how to register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        You can obtain an absentee ballot through your county clerk's office or fill out an absentee ballot request form here. To qualify for a mail-in absentee ballot, you must fulfill one of the following criteria:

        • Be of advanced age
        • Have a disability or illness
        • Be a student who temporarily resides outside the county
        • Temporarily reside outside of Kentucky (perhaps on vacation)
        • Be incarcerated but not yet convicted
        • Have a profession that takes you out of the county during the hours the polls are open
        • Be a military personnel confined to a military base on election day

        The deadline for applying for a mail-in absentee ballot is seven days before an election. The completed application must be received by the county clerk by mail or in person by the seven day deadline. The absentee ballot must be received in the county clerk's office by 6:00 pm on Election Day for the ballot to be counted.

        You can apply for a medical emergency absentee ballot if a medical emergency occurs within 14 days before an election. The spouse of the voter can also apply for an absentee ballot.

        You may request an application for an absentee ballot through county clerk's office in person, by phone, by mail or by fax. Also, the voter's spouse, parent or child can request an application for a mail-in absentee ballot.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can find information on how to register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        No excuses are needed to request a mail-in absentee ballot.

        To receive a mail-in ballot you must complete the State Absentee Ballot Request form. A signed copy of this form must be received by the county board of elections no later than 5pm on the last Tuesday before the election. You can mail, fax, email or hand deliver the form to the county board of elections. Find your county board of elections contact information here.

        When completing the State Absentee Ballot Request Form you must provide your name, address, birthdate, and an identification number (like your North Carolina driver license number, your North Carolina DMV identification card or the last four digits of your social security number). If you do not provide an identification number you must send one of the below in along with your form:

        • A copy of a current and valid photo ID
        • A copy of one of the following documents that shows your name and address: current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck or other government document.

        A person other than the voter (a near relative or legal guardian) may fill out the State Absentee Ballot Request form. A near relative is either your spouse, brother, sister, parent, grandparent, child, grandchild, mother-in-law, father-in-law, daughter-in-law, son-in-law, stepparent or stepchild.

        Once you receive your ballot, you may vote the ballot in the presence of two witnesses (or one witness if the witness is a notary-public). Once voted, you must seal the ballot in the return envelope and complete the information on the back of the return envelope. The witnesses must complete and sign the envelope in the space assigned to them. If someone assists the voter, they must sign and date the certificate as well.

        The voted ballot must be returned no later than 5pm on the night of the election. You may mail or hand deliver the envelope to the board of elections' office. If the ballot is received after 5pm it will only be counted if they are received by mail and have a postmark that is dated on or before the day of the election and they are received by 5pm three days following the election.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can find information on how to register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        Tennessee has two forms of absentee voting: absentee voting in person and absentee voting by mail. Under preexisting Tennessee law, first-time voters who register to vote by mail cannot vote by absentee ballot; they must vote in person. To vote by mail, you must fall under one of the following categories:

        • You will be outside the county of registration during the early voting period and all day on Election Day
        • You or your spouse are enrolled as a full-time student in an accredited college or university outside the county of registration
        • Your licensed physician has filed a statement with the county election commission stating that, in the physician's judgment, you are medically unable to vote in person. The statement must be filed not less than 7 days before the election and signed under the penalty of perjury
        • You reside in a licensed facility providing relatively permanent domiciliary care, other than a penal institution, outside your county of residence
        • You will be unable to vote in person due to service as a juror for a federal or state court
        • You are 60 or older
        • You have a physical disability and an inaccessible polling place
        • You are hospitalized, ill, or physically disabled and because of such condition cannot vote in person
        • You are a caretaker of a person who is hospitalized, ill, or disabled
        • You are a candidate for office in the election
        • You serve as an election day official or as a member or employee of the election commission
        • Your observance of a religious holiday prevents you from voting in person during the early voting period and on Election Day
        • You possess a valid commercial driver's license and certify that you will be working outside the state or county of registration during the early voting period and all day on Election Day

        You may request a by mail ballot by writing to your county elections office or fill out an absentee ballot request here. You may also email your request with an attached document including a scanned signature. Upon receipt of the request, the local election commission will mail an application for ballot to you. However, if you want to expedite the application process, you may place the following information in the request for ballot:

        • Your name
        • Your address
        • Your Social Security number
        • The address to mail the ballot outside the county (this applies only when the reason for voting by mail involves that you will be outside of the county during early voting and on election day)
        • The election you wish to participate in
        • The reason you wish to vote absentee
        • Your signature
        • Date of birth

        A request that contains this information will be treated and processed as an application for ballot, and a ballot will be mailed to you. Unless you are an individual who has registered to vote by mail and therefore are on the permanent absentee voting register, you must appear in person to vote in the first election after the registration becomes effective. If you are a by mail registrant who has already voted in person since the registration, then no additional information will be required to vote by mail.

        You may request an application for by mail ballot no earlier than 90 days before the election and no later than seven days before the election. To be processed for the next election, the application must be received by the election commission no later than 7 days before the election. The county elections office must receive the ballot by mail no later than the close of polls on Election Day. Once the election office issues an absentee by mail ballot to you, you can only vote by mail. If you notify the elections office that you have spoiled your ballot or have not received the ballot, the elections office shall supply you with subsequent voting supplies. The county elections office will reject the old application and send a new application to you immediately by mail to be completed and returned again. The by mail ballot must be received by the county elections office through the postal mail, it can not be hand delivered.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can find information on how to register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        To vote absentee by mail you must apply for a ballot with your county clerk or you can fill out absentee ballot request form here. No excuse is required for a registered voter to vote by absentee ballot. If you are a registered voter who leaves the state with the intent to make your residence elsewhere, you may vote by absentee ballot in Wyoming until you have met the residency requirement in your new state of residence.

        You may apply for an absentee ballot either in person, in writing, or by telephone, by providing the following information to your county clerk: Social Security number (optional), full name, date of birth, residence address (street, city, county, and zip code), the election for which the absentee ballot is requested and a statement that you are entitled to vote in the election. If you will not obtain the ballot in person, please indicate the address to which the absentee ballot is to be mailed or the name of the individual you designate in writing to deliver the ballot to you.

        For the general election, you may apply for an absentee ballot at anytime during the calendar year in which the election is held, but not on the day of the election. We recommend that you apply for your ballot no later than 17 days before the election to allow enough time to process your application for the general election. However, for specific dates you should contact your county clerk. Absentee ballots must be returned by the county clerk's office no later than 7pm on Election Day. Ballots can be returned in person or by mail.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can find information on how to register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        You may vote absentee beginning 31 days before an election, 21 days before a primary, 19 days before a referendum. You can fill out an absentee ballot request here. You may also call, e-mail, write or apply in person at your town clerk's office. When the application is completed, it must be returned to your town clerk's office, which will then issue you the absentee ballot and required enclosure envelopes. The sealed marked ballot and signed outer envelope must reach the town clerk's office before the close of the polls on Election Day.

        You may vote by absentee ballot if you expect to be unable to appear at your polling place during the hours of voting due to one of the following reasons:

        • You will be absent from town during all the hours of voting
        • Illness
        • Physical disability
        • Religion tenets that forbid secular (non-religious) activity on Election Day
        • Your required performance of duties as a primary, referendum, or election official at a polling place other than your own during all the hours on Election Day

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        As a registered voter, you may obtain an absentee ballot if you are:

        • 60 years old or older
        • Unable to vote without assistance at the polls
        • Expecting to be out of town on Election Day
        • In jail awaiting arraignment or trial
        • Unable to attend due to religious reasons
        • Appointed to work as an election inspector in a precinct outside of your precinct of residence

        A person who registers to vote by mail must vote in person in the first election in which he or she participates. The restriction does not apply to overseas voters, voters who are handicapped or voters who are 60 years of age or older.

        Requests to have an absentee ballot mailed to you must be submitted to your local clerk no later than 2:00 pm the Saturday before the election. You can also fill out an absentee ballot request form here.

        If an emergency, such as a sudden illness or family death, prevents you from reaching the polls on Election Day, you may request an emergency absentee voter ballot. Requests for an emergency ballot must be submitted after the deadline for regular absentee ballots has passed, but before 4:00 pm on Election Day. The emergency must have occurred at a time which made it impossible for you to apply for a regular absentee ballot. Your local clerk will have more information about emergency absentee voter ballots.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can find information on how to register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        Any registered voter may vote by absentee ballot. You do not need to be ill or "absent" to be an absentee voter.

        You may request an absentee ballot as early as 90 days before an election. (No absentee ballots are issued on election day except to a voter who is a resident of a health care facility). The request for an absentee ballot must be made to your county auditor or elections department. You can also fill out an absentee ballot request for here.

        NOTE: Absentee ballots must be signed and postmarked or delivered to the county election officer on or before election day.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can find information on how to register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        Any person registered to vote may cast an absentee ballot. If you cannot vote at your polling place for any reason or you will be absent from the state of Hawaii on Election Day, you may vote using an absentee ballot. You may also vote at an absentee walk-in polling place before Election Day; please see Early Voting below for more details.

        To request an absentee ballot by mail, you should complete an absentee ballot request form here. You can also obtain one from:

        • satellite city halls
        • office of the city/county clerks
        • U.S. post offices
        • All public libraries
        • All state agencies

        You can mail or drop off the completed application at the office of the city or county clerk. You will receive your ballot and instructions on how to vote your ballot by mail.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        You can apply for an early voting (formerly known as absentee) ballot by contacting your county clerk in person, by personal agent, by mail or by fax. You can print the early voting application request form from your state's website. To apply for early voting, you should complete the form and then mail or fax it to your county clerk.

        You may also send in a hand-written request. You can obtain an early voting ballot by writing to your county clerk or election commissioner with the following information:

        • Your name and residence address
        • Your political party affiliation
        • Your voting precinct (if known)
        • Your phone number
        • The mailing address you want the ballots sent to
        • Your signature

        All county election offices will accept early voting applications up to 120 days prior to a statewide election. However, regular early voting ballots are not sent out or voted until 35 days before the election. The last day to request an early voting ballot to be mailed is the Wednesday prior to Election Day at 4:00 pm. All early voting ballots whether personally delivered, delivered by agent or delivered by mail or other carriers must arrive by the closing of the polls on Election Day: 8:00 pm central time and 7:00 pm mountain time.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can find information on how to register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        If you are unable to vote in Alaska on Election Day, you can vote absentee:

        • In person (available 15 days before an election)
        • By mail (deadline for applying is 10 days before an election)
        • By fax (available 15 days before an election)

        Absentee ballot applications are available and can be requested and turned in anytime for each calendar year. The application deadline is 10 days prior to the election. You can request a ballot for a specific election or for all elections in the year. To receive an absentee ballot by mail, you must first send an application in order for your voter registration to be verified. One you have submitted your absentee ballot, you can verify your status by using your Secretary of State's tool.

        Send your application to the Division of Elections, Absentee Voting Office, 619 Ship Creek Ave, Suite 329, Anchorage, AK 99501-1677, phone is 907-375-6400, fax 907-375-6480, akabsentee@gov.state.ak.us.

        Apply early to receive your ballot in time. Regular absentee ballots are mailed approximately one to two weeks before an election. If your absentee ballot is to be sent to a remote area of Alaska and you will be there 60 days before or during an election, you may request a special advance ballot on this site.

        A special advance ballot will be mailed approximately 60 days before the election up until 32 days before the election. A regular ballot will also be mailed when available. Vote and return both ballots to make sure one is received. If both are received, only the regular ballot will be counted. Vote your ballot, have your signature witnessed on the envelope and mail it by Election Day.

        If you have questions about your absentee ballot application, you should contact the absentee voting office at (907) 375-6400.

        Absentee Voting by fax should be your last alternative to casting your ballot. By using this method to return your voted ballot, you need to be aware that you are voluntarily waiving your right to a secret ballot. You must apply separately for each election. You must submit your request no later than 5:00 pm the day before Election Day. If you are returning your ballot by fax, it must be voted, witnessed and received by the appropriate fax in the absentee voting office by 8:00 pm on Election Day.

        If you are a qualified voter who is disabled, you may apply for an absentee ballot through a personal representative who can bring the ballot to you. A personal representative can be anyone over 18, except a candidate for office in the election, your employer, an agent of your employer, or an officer or agent of your union. Ballots are available 15 days before the primary, general or statewide special election at any regional elections office.

        The personal representative brings the completed application to an election official for a ballot and takes the ballot to you. You complete a certificate authorizing the personal representative to carry your ballot, vote the ballot privately, place it in a secrecy sleeve and seal it inside the envelope provided. The personal representative brings the voted ballot back to the election official by 8:00 pm on Election Day.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        To vote by mail, follow these instructions:

        • Complete the application for an advance ballot
        • Provide either your driver's license number on the ballot application or a copy of your photo ID document with your application
        • Return the application to your county election office before the registration deadline for the next election
        • The ballot will be mailed to you. Complete and return your ballot to your county election office by mail for the next election
        • All ballots must be received in the county election office by the close of the polls on Election Day
        • You may request assistance in applying for and casting an advance voting ballot

        Absentee Ballot Process

        You are eligible for an absentee ballot if:

        • You are unavoidably absent from your county on Election Day
        • Unable to appear at the polls due to illness
        • disability a patient in a Veterans' Administration Hospital
        • Detained in jail awaiting grand jury action or confined in prison after conviction for an offense other than a felony.

        Applications for absentee ballots are available from your county board of elections and the LWV, and may also be available at hospitals, nursing homes, colleges, libraries, senior citizen centers, social service agencies, state government offices and from political parties. The applications can be downloaded from the NYS Board of Elections website or the LWVNYS website.You may also request an absentee ballot by sending a letter to your county board of elections. The letter must be received by your county board no earlier than 30 days and no later than seven days before the election. The letter must contain the following information:

        • The address where you are registered
        • An address where the ballot is to be sent
        • The reason for the request
        • The signature of the voter

        An application form will be mailed with your ballot. The application form must be completed and returned with your ballot. If you cannot pick up your ballot, or will not be able to receive it through the mail, you have the right to designate someone to pick it up for you. Only the person designated on your application may pick up and deliver your ballot. If you are permanently ill or disabled, you have the right to receive an absentee ballot for each subsequent election without further application. You should file an application with your board of elections containing a statement which describes the particulars of your illness or disability. The board will review the facts stated, and if satisfied, will mark your registration record. You will then automatically receive an absentee ballot for every election until your registration is canceled.

        To be counted, an absentee ballot must be postmarked by the day before Election Day and must reach the board of elections no more than seven days after the election. If the deadline for requesting an absentee ballot by mail has passed and you cannot appear at the polls on Election Day because of an accident or sudden illness, then you may send a representative with an authorized letter to receive an absentee ballot application and absentee ballot and return both to the board of elections by 9:00 pm on Election Day at your borough office. You can find your board of elections information at the New York State Board of Elections. If you have further questions, please call the state board of elections at 518-474-6220.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can find information on how to register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        Any registered voter may vote by absentee ballot. You must request an absentee ballot application from your County Election Official or fill out an absentee ballot request here. You will then be sent a paper absentee ballot to vote. Complete the ballot and return it to the County Election Official.

        The County Election Official must receive your application no later than 5pm the day before the election.

        If you are confined because of sickness or disability, you may apply in writing and obtain an absentee ballot by authorized messenger. The authorized messenger delivers the ballot from the County Election Official to the qualified voter and then delivers the marked ballot to the County Election Official. Any application for a ballot by authorized messenger must be received before 3pm the day of the election.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can find information on how to register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        There are several ways to request an absentee ballot.

        Request by Mail Download the application, complete the form and mail it to your municipal clerks's office. The application must be received no later than 5pm on the Thursday before the election.

        Request by email or fax.You may request that a ballot be sent to you by sending an email or fax to your municipal clerk. Before the ballot can be counted the clerk must have received a request from the voter with an original signature. You can print your emailed request, sign it and return it with your ballot, but include it outside the certified ballot envelope. You must send your request to the clerk before 5pm on the Thursday before the election.

        In Person at your Municipal Clerks Office.This can be done until 5pm or the close of business on the Friday before the election. If you apply for an absentee ballot at your clerks office, you must vote immediately, seal your ballot and return it to a member of the clerk's staff. You can not take the ballot from the clerk's office.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        You can fill out an absentee ballot request form here.

        If you wish to have an absentee ballot mailed to you, the application must be received by the county clerk's office by close of business on the seventh day preceding Election Day. Absentee ballots may be obtained in person at the county clerk's office until close of business on the Friday preceding Election Day. Absentee Ballots will be mailed 22 days prior to Election Day or thereafter within 3 days of the county clerk receiving a request for an absentee ballot. You should allow 7-10 days to receive your mail-in ballot. In order for the absentee ballot to be counted it must be returned to the county clerk's office by 7:00 pm on Election Day.

        In the that event your original absentee ballot is not received, or if it is spoiled, you may request a replacement absentee ballot. Contact your your county clerk's election office for additional information about obtaining a replacement absentee ballot. You can also confirm your voter registration information and check the status of your mail ballot online.

        If you request an absentee ballot and lose it, or for some reason are not able to vote with it, you may vote during early voting or on Election Day. When you vote, you will be provided a provisional ballot, and you must affirm that you requested an absentee ballot and did not and will not vote it.

        The change of residence section should be used only if you have moved within your county and will have lived at the new residence address at least 30 days prior to the election for which you are requesting an absentee ballot. If your residence address has changed from one Colorado county to another, you must register to vote with your new residence county prior to applying for an absentee ballot.

        If you are a first time voter who registers by mail to vote in Colorado, you are required to submit one of the forms of identification (listed below) with your application. If you have not already done so, you must also submit a copy of one of these forms of identification when you return your absentee ballot application. DO NOT include original documents with the application. Please submit a copy of one of the following forms of identification:

        • A valid Colorado driver's license
        • A valid Colorado Department of Revenue ID card
        • A valid pilot's license issued by the Federal Aviation Administration
        • A valid U.S. Military ID card with photograph
        • A valid Medicare or Medicaid card
        • A certified copy of a U.S. birth certificate
        • Certified documentation of naturalization
        • A valid U.S. passport
        • A valid employee identification with a photograph issued by the U.S. government, Colorado state government, or any county, municipality, board, authority, or other political subdivision of the state
        • A copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or other government document that shows your name and address. A cable bill, telephone bill or documentation from a Colorado public institution of higher education containing at least your name, date of birth, and legal residence address, or a paycheck from a government institution are also sufficient forms of ID

        Note: Some forms of ID may not contain an address. If your address appears on the identification, the address must be in Colorado.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can find information on how to register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        You may vote by absentee ballot if you:

        • Will be absent from your city or town on Election Day
        • Have a physical disability that prevents your voting at the polling place
        • Cannot vote at the polls due to religious beliefs

        You must be registered in order to vote absentee. You can fill out an absentee ballot request here. Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can find information on how to register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation. To register for an absentee ballot, you must apply in writing to the city or town clerk or election commission, either in a letter or by filling out an application form. You must include your:

        • Name
        • Address as registered
        • during a primary the the party you want to vote for
        • Ward and precinct (if you know them)
        • Address where you wish the absentee ballot sent
        • Your signature

        You can also receive an application form at your local election office or download the application online.

        You can also download an absentee voting application in English or Spanish and mail it into your town clerks' office. Either way, the application must be filled out in writing and signed. If you are both applying and voting in person, the deadline for applying for an absentee ballot is 12:00 pm on the day before an election. Absentee ballots are generally available three weeks before an election.

        If you wish to vote by absentee ballot for more than one election in a year, you may fill out one application and request that ballots for all elections during that calendar year be sent to you.

        Note: If your address changes within a calendar year you must submit a new application for an absentee ballot.

        If you are permanently disabled, you may file a doctor's letter with the local election office which states that you are permanently unable to vote at the polls due to a physical disability. The local election office will automatically mail you an application for an absentee ballot for all elections in a calendar year. You must sign the application and send it back to your local election official. Call your local election official for information about how to register to vote at home or to request that a mail-in registration form be sent to you.

        Your absentee ballot must be sealed and returned in the brown envelope that was sent with the ballot. You must sign the brown envelope in the designated place and place it in the white envelope with green trim that also came with the absentee ballot. Your ballot does not have to be witnessed and if you cannot mark your absentee ballot, you may ask any person to help you. The helper must print his or her name and your name on the brown envelope, write the reason you needed help and then sign his or her name as the assisting person.

        If you are in a nursing home you are able to vote by absentee ballot as long as you are not under a court ordered guardianship which specifically prohibits voting. If you are a patient in a nursing home, you must be a registered voter in order to vote by absentee ballot and must fill out an absentee ballot application. If the clerk designates a health care facility in writing 28 days before the election, the ballot must be hand-delivered to such facility by a registrar. If the you state that you have entered a hospital after 12:00 pm on the fifth day before the election the ballot may be hand-delivered to you; otherwise, the ballot should be mailed to the you at the facility. Consult the administration of the nursing home for further instructions.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        Oregon has a vote by mail process. Ballots will be mailed 14 to 18 days before an election. If it is determined by the county elections official that a person does not receive daily mail service from USPS, the ballot is mailed 18 to 20 days before the election. Out of state voters that are not long term absentee voters have their ballots mailed no sooner than the 29th day before the election. Long term and military absentee ballots (including all out of country ballots) are mailed 45 days before the election.

        You may apply for absentee voter status if you live out of state or if you know that you will be absent for the election (i.e., you will be out of town prior to the election and are putting your mail on hold.) Absentee ballots are available 45 days before the election. To apply for absentee voter status: obtain an absentee ballot request form from your county elections office or , fill out the form, and return it to your county elections office in person, via US mail or fax.

        If you prefer, your absentee ballot request can remain valid for all future elections until you notify your county elections official otherwise or you move out of the county. Please specify this preference on the request form.

        To be a long term absentee voter, you must be a resident of Oregon who is absent from your place of residence. Possible long term absentee voters could include a person temporarily living outside of the territorial limits of the United States and the District of Columbia or a spouse of a long term absentee voter.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can find information on how to register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        Absentee Ballot Process

        You are eligible for absentee voting if you:

        • In the regular and orderly course of your business, profession, or occupation or while on personal business or vacation, will be absent from the county or city in which you are entitled to vote.
        • Are a student attending a school or institution of learning, or a student's spouse, who will be absent on the day of election from the county or city in which you are entitled to vote.
        • Are unable to go in person to the polls on the day of election because of a physical disability, physical illness, or pregnancy.
        • Are confined while awaiting trial or for having been convicted of a misdemeanor, provided that the trial or release date is scheduled on or after the third day preceding the election. If you are awaiting trial and are a resident of the county or city where you are confined, you may be taken to the polls to vote on election day if your trial date is postponed and you did not have an opportunity to vote absentee.
        • Are a member of an electoral board, registrar, an officer of election, or custodian of voting equipment.
        • Are registered but unable to go in person to the polls on the day of the election because you are primarily and personally responsible for the care of an ill or disabled family member who is confined at home.
        • Are a duly registered person who is unable to go in person to the polls on the day of the election because of an obligation occasioned by your religion.
        • Will be at your place of work and commuting to and from your home to your place of work for 11 or more hours of the 13 that the polls are open (6:00 am to 7:00 pm).
        • Any person who is (i) a member of a uniformed service of the United States, as defined in 42 USC 1973ff-6(7), on active duty, or (ii) a member of the merchant marine of the Unites States, or (iii) who temporarily resides outside of the United States, or (iv) the spouse or dependent residing with any person listed in (i), (ii), or (iii), and who will be absent on the day of the election from the county or city in which he is entitled to vote. Find out more about Military and Overseas voting here.
        • Any person serving as a designated representative of a political party, independent candidate or candidate in a political party.
        • Any person serving as a designated representative of a political party, independent candidate or candidate in a political party

        You may request a mail ballot for presidential and vice-presidential electors only by writing across the top of your absentee application request ballot for presidential electors only. If you vote a presidential only ballot, you may not later decide to vote the rest of the ballot. The same procedures and deadlines apply as for other absentee applications and ballots.

        Note: If you are a new registrant who submitted your voter registration applications by mail, you must vote in person (either in-person absentee or at the polls on Election Day) unless you are a full time college student, absent active duty military member, residing overseas, physically handicapped, age 65 or over (however, an additional reason must also be given, as age itself does not qualify a voter for absentee voting), or voting a "presidential only" ballot. If you have a question about whether you qualify to vote absentee, or how to apply, you should contact your local elections office.

        How to Vote Absentee

        You can contact your local voter registration office to request an absentee ballot application. You can either return the completed application to your local voter registration office by mail or fax. To receive a ballot by mail, your absentee ballot application must be received in your local voter registration office by Tuesday before the general election. If you send it by fax the original must also be mailed and received by the registrar before returned ballot is requested on Election Day. Alternatively, you can download the Virginia absentee ballot application (pdf format) at your state's website. You must complete a separate absentee ballot application for each election in which you intend to vote absentee. The absentee ballot application must be received in your voter registrar's office by 5 p.m. on the Tuesday prior to Election Day.

        You can check the status of your absentee ballot with the Absentee Ballot Status Look Up tool.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        There is no specific deadline for absentee ballot applications to be received. However, no absentee ballots will be issued on the day before, or the day of the election.

        You do not need to provide a reason to request an absentee ballot by mail. You may request an absentee ballot as early as 180 days before an election. Absentee ballots must be received by the county board of registrars by 7:00 p.m. on Election Day. No absentee ballots are issued on the day before or the day of an election. You may fill out an absentee ballot request here. The application must be in writing and contain the address to which the ballot is to be mailed, sufficient information to identify you as a voter, and the election in which you wish to vote. If you are physically disabled or living temporarily outside your county of residence, a close relative may apply for an absentee ballot for you. You may vote by absentee ballot in person at the registrars' office, Monday through Friday, the week prior to the election without having to provide a reason.

        A physically disabled or illiterate voter may receive assistance from another voter in the same county or municipality or from the same category of relatives who can make an application for or deliver an absentee ballot. If the voter is outside of the county or municipality, then a notary public can provide such assistance. Any person who assists another person to vote absentee must complete an oath prescribed by law demonstrating the statutory disability and that the ballot was completed as the voter desired. Other than federal elections, no person may assist more than ten voters in a primary, election, or runoff. A candidate on the ballot, or a relative of a candidate on the ballot, may not offer assistance during the election to any voter who is not related to the candidate.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can find information on how to register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        If you are a registered voter, you may vote by absentee ballot, even if you are able to vote in person on Election Day. To vote absentee, you must first apply for an absentee ballot. Applications are available during a period beginning 75 days before Election Day and ending at 12:00 pm on the day before the election.You may pick up an application at your local election office or at the secretary of state's Office, or you may call either office and ask to have an application mailed to you. Mail the application or drop it off at your local elections office. Once you have submitted your application, your absentee ballot will be mailed to you, unless you indicate on the application that you would prefer to have someone pick it up for you. Once you have marked your ballot, return it to your local election office before the polls close on Election Day in the secrecy envelope provided.You can track your absentee ballot on your state's website.Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        The last day to apply for an absentee ballot is five days prior to an election. Ballots must be postmarked by the day before the election or can be hand delivered by 5:00 pm on Election Day.

        For statewide elections, absentee ballot applications and completed absentee ballots should be hand delivered or mailed to the absentee election manager in care of the circuit clerk for your county.

        If you vote an absentee ballot you muct submit a copy of a valid photo ID. If you are entitled to vote abesentee through the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act, the Voting Accessibility for the Elderly and Handicapped Act, or any other federal law, you are not required to show the photo ID when voting absentee.

        Absentee Voting Eligibility

        You may cast an absentee ballot if you:

        • Will be absent from the county on Election Day
        • Are ill or have a physical disability that prevents a trip to the polling place
        • Are a registered Alabama voter living outside the county, such as a member of the armed forces, a voter employed outside the United States, a college student, or a spouse or child of such a person
        • Are an appointed election office or poll watcher at a polling place other than your regular polling place
        • You are working a required shift of ten hours or more that coincides with polling hours

        Business and medical emergency voting applications can be made after the absentee deadline, but no later than 5:00 pm on the day before the election, if you:

        • Are required by an employer under unforeseen circumstances to be out of the county on Election Day for an emergency business trip
        • Have a medical emergency requiring treatment from a licensed physician

        In addition to application information outlined in the next section, the business emergency application contains an affidavit acknowledging that you were not aware of the out-of-county business trip prior to the normal absentee ballot deadline. The medical emergency application requires that the attending physician describe and certify the circumstances as constituting an emergency.

        To obtain an absentee ballot, write or visit the local absentee election manager at your local circuit clerk. You will need to provide the following information:

        • Name and residential address (or other information to verify voter registration)
        • Election for which the ballot is requested
        • Reason for absence from polls on Election Day
        • Party choice for primary elections
        • Address to which the ballot should be mailed
        • Voter signature (if a mark is made in place of a signature, it must be witnessed)

        Upon receiving the absentee ballot application, the absentee election manager may request additional evidence on the reason for voting absentee if you have a history of absentee voting. The absentee ballot applications must turned in no later than the fifth day before the election.

        If the absentee ballot application is approved, the absentee election manager forwards the absentee ballot by U.S. Mail, or personally hands the absentee ballot to the voter (or to a designee in the case of emergency voting).

        Ballot Receipt/Return

        The absentee ballot can not be counted unless the affidavit is notarized or has the signatures of two witnesses.

        The absentee ballot comes with three envelopes: one plain (the secrecy envelope), one with an affidavit or oath, printed on the outside, and one plain envelope, preaddressed (the outer envelope). Once you cast the ballot, the procedure is as follows:

        • Seal the ballot in the plain envelope
        • Place the plain envelope inside the accompanying affidavit envelope
        • Seal the affidavit envelope and complete the affidavit that is on the outside of the envelope
        • Sign the affidavit and have the signature witnessed by either a notary public or two witnesses 18 years of age or older
        • Place the affidavit envelope AND a copy of voter identification inside the outer envelope
        • Remember to place a copy of your I.D. (NOT THE ORIGINAL) inside the outer envelope

        Two legal ways to return the absentee ballot:

        • By U.S. mail
        • Personally hands the absentee ballot to the absentee election manager (or delivers by a designee in case of emergency absentee voting)

        Absentee Ballot Return Deadline

        Absentee ballot that is returned by mail must be postmarked no later than the day prior to the election and received by the Absentee Election Manager no later than noon on election day. If it is hand delivered, the ballot must be in the office of the Absentee Election Manager by the close of business (no later than 5 pm) on the day prior to the election.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can register to vote and requestan absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        Applications for absentee ballots can be obtained online in a PDF format, or mailed upon request from the Secretary of State. You can also request a ballot by mailing the application to the county auditor/commissioner of elections in the county where you are registered.

        The request form must be received in the county auditor's office by 5 pm on the Friday before the election. If the request is received so late that it is unlikely the absentee ballot can be returned by mail in time to be considered for counting, the county auditor will enclose a statement to that effect with the absentee ballot.

        After receiving the request form, the county auditor will mail the voter a ballot. For primary and general elections, the ballots are mailed no later than 40 days before election day. For other elections, ballots are mailed to voters as soon as they are ready. The county auditor will include instructions on how to mark the ballot as well as how to return the ballot.

        You can return your voted absentee ballot by mail. The ballot must be postmarked by the Monday before election day or earlier and received in the county auditor's office no later than the Monday following the election. Voted absentee ballots cannot be delivered to the polling place on election day. If you have not returned your absentee ballot on election day, you have the following options:

        • Deliver your voted absentee ballot to the county auditor's office before the polls close on election day
        • Surrender your voted absentee ballot at the polls and vote a regular ballot
        • Vote a provisional ballot at the polls if you cannot surrender your voted absentee ballot

        Absentee Ballot Process

        No excuse is required to vote with an absentee ballot. You may request an absentee ballot from any county clerk's office. Any voter or organization may request the New Mexico absentee ballot application by mail, telephone, or in person. However, the information on the form may not be altered or re-arranged. You must complete the application on your own. You can also fill out an absentee ballot request form here.

        The county clerk must receive the New Mexico absentee ballot application no later than 5:00 pm on Friday, before the election. The county clerk must either mail the ballot or notify you with the reason why the application was not accepted, within 24 hours of receipt of the application.

        The county clerk must receive the federal absentee application by facsimile or scanned document no later than 5:00 pm on Friday, before the election.

        If you apply for an absentee ballot and receive it, you must vote that ballot. You will not be issued another ballot if the original ballot is destroyed, discarded or delivered to the polls unvoted. If you apply for, but do not receive the absentee ballot, you may go to the county clerk's office until Monday, before the election and apply for a replacement ballot for the election.

        You may also go to your polling place and vote on a paper ballot, in lieu of an absentee ballot on Election Day. You will be required to sign a sworn statement, under penalty of perjury, that you did not receive your ballot.

        A member of your immediate family or your caregiver may hand-deliver your absentee ballot to the county clerk. An unrelated third party may not deliver another voter's absentee ballot. Ballots must be returned to the county clerk or voter's precinct before 7:00 pm on Election Day to be counted.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        You may vote by absentee ballot for any of the following reasons:

        • You are on vacation or outside the county on Election Day
        • You are a member of the Uniformed Services or Merchant Marine, and your spouse and dependents who reside with you are also eligible
        • You are, for reasons of employment, not able to vote on election day
        • You are physically disabled
        • You are 65 years of age or older
        • You are serving as a juror in state or federal court on election day
        • You are admitted to the hospital as an emergency patient on the day of election or within a four-day period before the election
        • You are confined to a jail or pre-trial facility pending disposition of arrest or trail
        • You are a certified poll watcher, poll manager and county election official working on election day
        • You are a student attending school outside your county of residence or are a spouse or dependent of such a student
        • You are a person serving with the American Red Cross or with the United Service Organizations who are attached to and serving with the Armed Forces outside your county of residence or a spouse or dependent of such a person
        • You are a Government employee serving outside your county of residence on Election Day or a spouse or dependent of such a person
        • You are a person with a death or funeral in the family within three days before the election
        • You are an overseas voter
        • You are a person attending to a sick or physically disabled person

        To request an absentee ballot by mail, request the application and either email, mail or fax your county voter registration office. You will then be mailed an application. Complete the application, sign and return the completed application to you county voter registration office by 5pm on the 4th day before the election. You may return the application in person or by mail, email or fax. You will then be mailed an absentee ballot.

        To check the status of your absentee ballot, please use your state's tool.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        Reasons for voting absentee - you are:

        • Attending school
        • Traveling outside the county for business or personal reasons
        • Injury, illness, physical disability or advanced age
        • Incarcerated or serving home confinement for misdemeanor, and legally registered to vote
        • Work hours and distance from county seat
        • Work assignment requires living temporarily outside the county (4 years or less)
        • Service as election or appointed or federal official requires living temporarily outside country

        To download the absentee ballot application, use your state's resource. Your request for an absentee ballot must be received no later than the 6th day before the election. Unless you are voting absentee by mail because of illness or disability, the ballot must be mailed to an out-of-county address. You may apply as early as eighty-four days before the election, but the ballots are not ready for mailing to you until six weeks before the election.

        Emergency Absentee Ballot: A ballot can be brought to you at the hospital or nursing facility if you have been admitted because of an emergency during the last week before the election. A family member may request the emergency absentee voting service by telephone OR the County Clerk will schedule a team of emergency absentee voting commissioners to go to the voter at the hospital and the team will return the application and the ballot to the County Clerk. Check with your County Clerk to determine what hospitals provide this service.

        To download an emergency absentee ballot application, click here.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        Any registered voter may Vote By Mail. You use one of the following methods to vote by mail:

        • Applying in writing to your county election official
        • Completing the absentee ballot application that is included in your sample ballot, which your county elections official will mail to you prior to each election
        • Downloading and completing an vote-by-mail application on-line.

        Elections officials process applications 29 days to 7 days before an election. You may request an absentee ballot more than 29 days before an election, but not fewer than 7 days in advance.

        Absentee ballots must be received by the elections official no later than the close of polls (8:00 pm) on Election Day.You may return your absentee ballot by returning it in person or by mail to your county election official or in person to any polling place in your county or by end of polls closing on Election Day. If, because of illness or physical disability, you are unable to return the ballot yourself, you may designate a spouse, child, parent, grandparent, sibling, or a person residing in the same household to return the ballot to the elections official or precinct board at any polling place within the jurisdiction.

        Permanent Absentee Voting (PAV)

        Any registered voter may apply for permanent absentee voter status. If you are a permanent absentee voter, you will automatically receive an absentee ballot for each election. To become a permanent absentee voter, you must complete an application, which is available from your county election official.

        If you complete an application to become a permanent absentee voter, you will retain this status as long as you vote in all statewide primary and general elections. If you fail to cast a ballot in two consecutive statewide general elections, you will be removed from the permanent absent voter list and will need to reapply in order to restore status.

        Late Absentee Ballot Requests

        If, in the seven days before the election, you find you will not be able to vote in person on Election Day, you may still request an absentee ballot. You must make a written request, signed under penalty of perjury, and deliver it, either in person or by someone you designate, to your county election official.

        According to California Elections laws, individuals, organizations and groups may distribute absentee ballot applications; however, they must use the uniform format as specified in the California Elections Code. A copy of the application form is available on your state's website.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can find information on how to register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        Any registered voter can vote absentee. You can obtain an absentee ballot by filling out the absentee ballot application. The deadline to request an absentee ballot is usually seven days before an election. However to find out exact dates please contact local board of elections

        After you receive your ballot, vote the ballot and return it to your county board of elections on or before 8:00 pm on Election Day. A ballot received by the county board of elections will be counted provided it has been received by 8:00 pm on Election Day or it was mailed before Election Day, bearing a postmark verifying that fact, and the ballot is received from the postal service or private mail carrier on the second Friday after the election. You must remember to affirm on the oath that is returned with your voted ballot that you will be absent or unable to vote in person in the election. If you will not be absent or are able to vote in person in the election, you should not complete and submit this form and should plan on voting at your polling place on election day.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        Any registered voter in Oklahoma may vote by absentee ballot. It is not necessary to give a reason for voting absentee. Applications for absentee ballots must be made in writing. The deadline to apply for an absentee ballot to be mailed to you is always 5:00 pm on Wednesday preceding the election. Absentee ballot application forms are available from all county election boards and from the state election board. You can also use your state's application. However, you are not required to use the form. You may write a letter to your county election board to apply for absentee ballots. The letter must contain the following information:

        • Your name
        • Your birth date
        • The address at which you are registered to vote
        • The election(s) for which you are requesting ballot(s)
        • The address where ballot(s) should be mailed
        • Your signature

        You may apply for absentee ballots for one election, for several elections or for all elections in which you are eligible to vote during the calendar year in which the application is submitted. You may mail your absentee ballot application to the county election board, fax it, send it via telegram or deliver it personally to the county election board office. However, you may not deliver an application for another person. If your absentee ballot is mailed to you, you must return it to the county election board by mail.

        An absentee ballot must be received by the county election board before 7:00 pm on Election Day to be counted.

        If you become incapacitated after 5:00 pm on the Tuesday preceding an election, you may receive an absentee ballot through special emergency procedures. You must make a written request to the county election board. The request must be accompanied by a statement from a doctor stating you are incapacitated and will be unable to vote in person on Election Day. Your request and the doctor's statement must be taken to the county election board office by the person you choose. This person becomes your agent. The county election board can provide a form to be used for both your request and the doctor's statement. The agent will receive your ballot and will deliver it to you. After you mark the ballot, the agent must return it to the county election board office before 7:00 pm on Election Day.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can find information on how to register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        There are several ways for you to vote absentee by mail.

        Vote at Home on Election Day. If you are sick or disabled a ballot can be delivered to your home on election day. You must request an absentee ballot before 5pm on the day before the election. On election day, two justices of the peace will deliver a ballot to you and then will bring the ballot back to the polling place so it can be counted.

        Vote by Mail. Any voter can request that the town clerk mail them an early voter absentee ballot. Once voted, you can return the ballot to the clerk in the envelope included with the ballot. The clerk must receive the ballot by the close of the polls on Election Day to be counted. You can request a ballot at any time before an election and clerks will mail absentee ballots within the 45 days before the election.

        Hand Delivered Ballots. A voter may pick up a ballot at the town clerk's office at any time beginning 45 days before the general or primary election. You can deliver the voted ballot in a sealed envelope to the clerk on or before election day. The ballot can be returned to the clerk or delivered to the polling place by the voter or any person the voter authorizes to return the ballot for them. However, you can only pick up your own ballot from the clerks office.

        All requests must be submitted by 5pm or the close of the Town Clerk's office on the day before the election. You can download the request form here.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        You can fill out an absentee ballot request form here.

        Florida law allows all qualified voters to request an absentee ballot from the Supervisor of Elections. A member of the voter's immediate family or legal guardian may also request an absentee ballot for a voter, if directly instructed to do so by the voter. The request can cover all elections through the next two regularly scheduled general elections. A request for an absentee ballot to be mailed must be made no later than 5 p.m. on the 6th day before an election. Contact your Supervisor of Elections to request an absentee ballot.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        Absentee voting begins six weeks prior to an election for registered voters. You may vote by absentee ballot if you fulfill one of the following criteria:

        • You will be absent on Election Day from the jurisdiction of the election authority in which you are registered to vote
        • You are incapacitated or confined due to illness or physical disability
        • You are the primary caretaker for a person who is incapacitated or confined due to illness or disability
        • Your religious beliefs or practice prevent you from voting on Election Day
        • You are employed as an election authority, as a member of an election authority, or by an election authority at a location other than your polling place
        • You are incarcerated (provided all qualifications for voting are retained)

        You can request absentee ballots from your local election authority in person or by mail or fax. Mailed in or faxed absentee ballot requests should be submitted to the appropriate local election authority. Relatives within the first degree (parents and children,) may complete an absentee ballot application, in person, on behalf of the voter who wishes to vote absentee. Do not send absentee ballot applications to the secretary of state's office. They must be sent to the local election authority to be valid.

        Mail-in or faxed absentee ballot requests must be received by the election authority no later than the 5:00 pm on the Wednesday prior to any election. If you have registered to vote by mail and are voting absentee the first time you vote, you are required to provide a copy of your ID with your absentee ballot request unless you provided a copy with your voter registration application. Examples of acceptable ID are:

        • Valid Missouri driver's license
        • Valid Missouri non-driver's license
        • Valid U.S. passport
        • Valid military ID

        This identification requirement, as well as the notary requirement for absentee ballots, does not apply to overseas voters, those on active military duty or members of their immediate family living with them or voters who are permanently disabled and their caregivers.

        The election authority must receive all absentee ballots by the close of polls on Election Day in order to be counted.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Oversea Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        All registered voters in Indiana are eligible to vote absentee-in-person at the county election board office beginning 29 days before Election Day. Please see the 'Early Voting' section below for more information.

        If you wish to have your absentee ballot sent to you by mail or delivered to you by a traveling board, you must be at least one of the following:

        • Having a specific, reasonable expectation that you will be absent from your county of residence on Election Day during the entire 12 hours that the polls are open (6:00 am to 6:00 pm)
        • An election official
        • Confined on Election Day due to illness or injury during the entire 12 hours that the polls are open
        • A voter with disabilities
        • 65 years of age or older
        • Caretaker of an individual(s) confined to a private residence due to illness or injury and prevented from voting during the entire 12 hours that the polls are open
        • Scheduled to work for the entire 12 hours that the poll is open
        • Prevented from voting due to observing a religious discipline or holiday during the entire 12 hours that the polls are open
        • Participating in the address confidentiality program

        If you are eligible to vote absentee, you must fill out the absentee voting application. You must submit your application for an absentee ballot at least eight days before the election. If you are a confined voter or a voter caring for a confined individual, there are other deadlines and requirements that apply.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        In New Jersey, you can vote by absentee ballot for any election. You do not need a reason for an absentee ballot. You may apply for an absentee ballot by completing an absentee ballot application and mailing the application to your county clerk by mail up to 7 days prior to the election.

        You may also apply in person to the county clerk until 3:00 p.m. the day before the election.

        The County Clerk cannot accept faxed copies of an Absentee Ballot Application since an original signature is required.

        If you applied for an absentee ballot and were required to show identification, you should have received a request for identification in your absentee ballot material. The identification requirement, however, does not apply to any absentee voter who receives a ballot because of temporary illness or a temporary or permanent disability or any absentee military or overseas civilian voter.

        Absentee ballots must be received by the Board of Election by the close of the polls on election day.

        If you have any questions, you can call 1-877-NJ-VOTER (1-877-658-6837).

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can find information on how to register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        If you are a registered voter, you may vote by mail (absentee voting) only if:

        • You are physically unable to vote in a polling place because of illness or physical or mental disability
        • You are confined to a nursing home, convalescent home or hospital
        • You are away due to employment or service connected with military operations or because you are a spouse or legal dependent who lives with that person or a U.S. citizen who will be outside the United States
        • You may not be able to vote at your assigned polling place the day of election.

        For more information visit your state site. You may pick up an application yourself, have another person pick one up for you or call your local board and request that an application be sent to you.

        The application must be filled out, witnessed or notarized and delivered to the local board so that it is received no later than 4:00 pm on the 21st day before the election. The completed application may be mailed, dropped off by you or personally delivered by a person acting at your request.

        If emergency circumstances arise after the regular mail ballot application deadline, you may apply for an emergency mail ballot at your local board of canvassers. You can apply up until 4 p.m. on the day before an election. Your emergency mail ballot must be received by the state Board of Elections no later than 9 p.m. the day of the election.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        To be qualified to vote an absentee ballot, you must meet one of the following criteria:

        • You will be unavoidably absent from your polling site on Election Day (the law does not require you to give a reason)
        • You will be unable to attend your polling site on election day due to illness or physical disability
        • You are a member of the U.S. armed forces, merchant marines or the spouse or a dependant family member
        • A U.S. citizen domiciled in Arkansas but temporarily living outside the territorial limits of the United States

        You can obtain an application for an absentee voting ballot from your county clerk who may mail or fax you an application, or you can fill out an absentee ballot request form here. You may also request an application in person at your county clerk's office. On the application, there is a reference to a designated bearer. This is anyone chosen by you to pick up or deliver your ballot. On the application, there is a reference to an agent and an authorized agent. This means if you are a hospital patient or a resident in a long-term care facility, then an administrator of the facility may assist you in the absentee voting process. This person must file an affidavit with the local county clerk to become your authorized agent.

        The deadline to submit your absentee ballot is dependent upon on your method for submitting the application back to the county clerk:

        • In person by you: close of business the day before the election
        • By designated bearer: close of business the day before the election
        • By mail or by fax: 7 days before the election
        • By authorized agent: 1:30 pm on Election Day

        Note: The law does not prohibit county clerks from mailing absentee ballot applications during the seven days prior to an election. However, if you receive the application during that window, you or your chosen bearer must deliver it personally to the county clerk. You can receive your application for absentee ballot by picking it up in person, receiving it by mail, or by allowing a bearer to pick it up (an administrator, authorized agent or designated bearer.) The law only specifies a time window for designated bearers. They may pick up your ballot no earlier than 15 days before a preferential or general election and no earlier than 7 days before a runoff. You should pick up your ballot based on the ability to deliver it back to the county clerk on time. Again, to submit your ballot the deadline depends on your method of delivery:

        • In person by you: close of business the day before the election
        • By mail: by 7:30 p.m. on Election Day
        • By designated bearer: 7:30 p.m. on Election Day
        • By authorized agent: 7:30 p.m. on Election Day

        Separate applications for absentee ballots are needed for every election. You must submit a new application for each election cycle. If you reside outside your county of registration (such as students or military voters,) are disabled or reside in a care facility, you will receive applications through the next two regularly scheduled general elections for federal office, including any runoff elections which may occur as a result of the outcome of the general election. You must indicate this preference on the application itself.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can find information on how to register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        Any registered voter may cast an absentee ballot instead of voting in person at the polling place on Election Day. You do not need to have a specific reason or be unable to vote at the polls on Election Day to receive an absentee ballot.

        To cast an absentee vote:

        Absentee ballots may be requested beginning 3 months before Election Day. Make your request early to allow enough time for the ballot to be mailed to you. You can make a telephone request for your own ballot, which will be mailed to the address you provide to the clerk.

        Additionally, you can obtain a ballot for an immediate family member in this same way. A ballot will be mailed directly to you or to an immediate family member making the request. Your municipal clerk can tell you who is considered immediate family under the law. Ballots obtained by the voter or an immediate family member do not require witnesses, unless the voter receives assistance from another person in reading or marking the ballot. You may make a written request for a third person (someone other than you or your immediate family member) to obtain and hand-deliver an absentee ballot. You must designate, in a written request or application, the specific third person who will handle and deliver the ballot. Only this designated third person may handle the absentee ballot. Ballots cast in this way must be witnessed by either a notary public, a municipal clerk, a clerk of courts, or two other witnesses.

        To be counted, voted absentee ballots must be received by the municipal clerk before the polls are closed on Election Day.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can find information on how to register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        A qualified Ohio voter does not have to state a reason to vote by an absentee ballot, and a voter with only a Social Security number or an Ohio license number as identification can cast a regular ballot. However, the ballot must be applied for in writing. If you are properly registered to vote, you submit your written request to the board of elections of the county in which your voting residence is located. Your request must contain certain information (discussed below) and your original signature. You may, but are not required to, use the application form prescribed by the Ohio Secretary of State.

        You do not need to submit an official absentee ballot application. You need to request an absentee ballot by written request, and it must contain all of the following information:

        • Your date of birth
        • Your name
        • Your signature
        • The address at which you are registered to vote and your date of birth
        • One of these items showing proof of identification: Ohio driver's license number, the last four digits of your Social Security number, a copy of your current and valid photo ID, military ID, or a current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or other government document that shows your name and current address
        • A statement identifying the election for which absent voter's ballots are requested
        • A statement that you are a qualified elector
        • If you want the ballots to be mailed, the address to which you want them mailed

        Absentee voting begins 29 days before an election. Absentee ballots must be received before the close of the polls on election day, or postmarked no later than the day before an election and received no later than 10 days after the close of the polls. Once absentee ballots are available for voting, you may either vote in person at the county board of elections office, or receive and return the absentee ballot via U.S. Mail, or overnight delivery services such as FedEx or UPS.

        To receive your absentee ballot:

        • By mail: Unless you are a member of the U.S. armed forces, you must mail your properly completed absentee ballot application bearing your original signature to the board of elections of the county where your voting residence is located. The board must receive your request by noon on the Saturday before the election. However, you should submit your request as far in advance of the election as possible.
        • In person: You may go to the county board of elections office during regular business hours after absentee ballots are available for voting, but no later than the day before the election, and request, receive and immediately vote your ballot at the board office.
        • If you are hospitalized on election day, regardless of where you are hospitalized, you must submit a properly completed and signed request to the board of elections of the county where your voting residence is located by 3:00 pm on Election Day. To be eligible under this provision, you must be confined in a hospital because of an unforeseeable medical emergency. Your application must specify where, why and when you came to be hospitalized. You may include in your absentee ballot application a request that your county board of elections give your unmarked ballot to a designated relative. A relative includes: your spouse, father, mother, father-in-law, mother-in-law, grandfather, grandmother, brother, sister, son, daughter, adopted parent, adopted child, stepparent, stepchild, uncle, aunt, nephew or niece. Your relative would then deliver the ballot to you in the hospital and return it to the board office after you have voted it. If you are hospitalized in the same county where you are registered to vote, two representatives of the board of elections can deliver the ballot to you and return it to the board office.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can find information on how to register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        If you are registered to vote, you may vote by absentee ballot. A separate absentee ballot application must be filled out for each election. All completed forms should be mailed to your county clerk's office.

        For regular absentee voting, the ballot application must be received no later than the Thursday before the election.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can find information on how to register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        You do not need a reason to vote absentee. There are two ways to cast an absentee ballot. You can vote absentee ballot by mail or cast an in-person absentee ballot at the board of elections office.

        You can fill out an absentee ballot request form here.

        You may request a mail absentee ballot in writing up to seven days prior to an election. Your absentee ballot must be postmarked or delivered to the board of elections office on or before Election Day. The return envelope must be signed in order for your vote to be counted.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can find information on how to register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        You are eligible to vote absentee if you are a duly qualified and registered voter who will be absent from your county of residence on Election Day or are:

        • A disabled war veteran who is a patient in any hospital and a citizen of Mississippi
        • A citizen of Mississippi temporarily residing outside the territorial limits of the United States and the District of Columbia
        • An employee engaged in interstate transportation
        • A student, teacher or administrator
        • An employee engaged in offshore employment, or as an employee on a vessel or other watercraft
        • An employee, businessperson, professional, tradesman or worker required to be over 50 miles away from the county of residence on election day due to employment
        • A person with a temporary or permanent physical disability
        • 65 years of age or older
        • A parent, spouse or dependent of a person with a temporary or permanent disability hospitalized more than 50 miles from home county and with such person Election Day
        • A member of a congressional delegation

        Please check with your voter registrar to determine if you are entitled to vote absentee and to learn the procedures for doing so. You can fill out an absentee ballot request form here.

        U.S. military personnel and overseas citizens can find information on how to register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        You do not need an excuse to vote absentee in Illinois.

        Steps to request an absentee ballot:

        STEP 1: Obtain the proper application for an absentee ballot, either by mail or in person, from your election authority.

        STEP 2: Upon receipt, complete the application. Make certain to include your name, home address, address where you want the ballot to be mailed, and please remember to sign the application.

        STEP 3: After completing the application, either mail it or hand-deliver it to your election authority. If you return the application in person or complete the application in the election authority's office, you may immediately vote with your absentee ballot in the election authority's office. If you mail the application and it is properly completed, the election authority will mail your absentee ballot to you.

        STEP 4: After receiving your ballot, VOTE THE BALLOT IN SECRET. Insert the ballot into the envelope provided, seal it, complete and sign the certification on the back and PERSONALLY return it or mail it. The absentee voter may authorize, in writing, that a spouse, parent, child, brother, sister, or licensed motor carrier, should deliver the completed absentee ballot to the election authority in sufficient time to be delivered to the polling place on Election Day.

        You can request an absentee ballot by mail from 40 days prior to the election up till 5 days before the election. You can request an absentee ballot in person 40 days before the election up till 1 day before the election. Please contact specific county officials for absentee ballots sent from outside the United States.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can find information on how to register to vote and request an absentee ballot from the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        Absentee ballots are avaiable from your town or city clerk approximately 30 days before an election. A person may vote by absentee ballot if:

        • They will be absent from the city/town in which they are qualified to vote on the day of an election
        • You are physically disabled and unable to vote in person
        • You are a member (or a spouse or a dependent of a member) of the uniformed services who will be absent on election day
        • Your observance of a religious commitment prevents you from voting in person
        • You are unable to appear at any time during the polling hours at your polling place because of a work obligation that requres you to remain physically at work or be in transit to or from work from the time the polls open until after the polls close

        To request an absentee ballot, you may download the application. You can also submit a request in writing. You must include all the information that is on the application. Don't forget your name, voting address, mailing address and your signature.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        If you are unable to vote at your polling place on Election Day, you may be able to vote by absentee ballot. You are able to vote absentee if you are:

        • A person who is in the military service of the United States
        • A spouse or dependent residing with or accompanying a person in the military service of the United States who expects to be absent on Election Day
        • A member of the Merchant Marine and your spouse and dependents residing with you expect to be absent on Election Day
        • A member of a religious or welfare group attached to and serving with the armed forces and your spouse and dependents living with or accompanying you expect to be absent on Election Day
        • An individual who, because of the elector's duties, occupation or business expects to be absent on Election Day
        • A qualified war veteran elector who is bedridden or hospitalized due to illness or physical disablity and will be absent on Election Day
        • A person who, because of illness or physical disability, is unable to attend your polling place or to operate a voting machine with assistance by distinct and audible statements
        • A spouse or dependent accompanying a person employed by the Commonwealth or the federal government, in the event that the employee's duties, occupation or business on Election Day require you to be absent
        • A county employee who expects that your Election Day duties relating to the conduct of the election will prevent the employee from voting
        • A person who will not attend a polling place on Election Day because of the observance of a religious holiday

        NEW:Beginning in November 2012, voters must provide a driver's license number, last 4 digits of Social Security number or a copy of an acceptable photo ID when applying for an absentee ballot. You may provide this information to the county over the phone, by email or by mail. Identification will be verified by the county before the voter's ballot with be counted. You have 6 days following the election to provide the necessary ID. UOCAVA voters and voters affected by the Voting Accessibility for Elderly and Handicapped Act are exempt.

        To apply for an absentee ballot, download and print the absentee ballot application and send it to your county election office.

        You may also apply for an absentee ballot through a letter. This letter must be signed by the voter and must include the same information as the forms provided by the Secretary of the Commonwealth.

        The County Board of Elections must receive the applications no later than 5pm on the Tuesday before Election Day.

        If you have an emergency and did not apply for an absentee ballot by the deadline you may download and apply for an Emergence Absentee Ballot. This application must be notarized before it is submitted.

        Absentee Ballot Process

         

        Fill out your absentee ballot request here.

        There is no excuse required to use an absentee ballot in Arizona. Arizona allows the federal write-in absentee ballot (FWAB) to be used in a primary, general or special election where federal offices will be elected. In order to be eligible to use the FWAB, the county recorder must receive your request for a regular early ballot before 7:00 pm on Election Day and you must not have received that ballot.

        A FWAB will not be counted if the application for the regular early ballot is received after 7:00 pm on Election Day or if your regular early ballot is received by the county recorder by 7:00 pm on Election Day.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Voter Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        You must have a reason to vote by mail, unless you are a military or overseas citizen (please see below for more information for military and overseas voting). There are 12 reasons to vote by mail:

        • You are a senior citizen 65 years of age or older
        • You are a home or a nursing home or veterans' home resident and you have been previously approved for the Disability program, or you are disabled, homebound or a nursing or veterans' home resident and you are submitting current proof of disability with your application. For more information on the Disability Program, click here.
        • A student, instructor, or professor (or spouse or dependents of the following,) in an institution of higher learning located outside the parish.
        • A minister, priest, rabbi, or clergy (or spouse or dependents of the following,) assigned to a religious post outside the parish.
        • A person who is or who expects to be temporarily outside the territorial limits of the state or absent from the parish during early voting and on Election Day.
        • A person who has moved after the registration books closed (30 days prior to an election) to another parish and the new residence is more than 100 miles from the parish of former residence.
        • A sequestered jury member.
        • A person who expects to be hospitalized on Election Day and did not have such knowledge until after early voting week passed.
        • A person who expects to be hospitalized on Election Day and who was hospitalized during early voting.
        • A person who was hospitalized and released prior to an election but who is either hospitalized or restricted to bed during early voting and on Election Day.
        • A person who by virtue of employment or occupation expects to be out of their precinct during early voting and on Election Day.
        • You are involuntarily confined in an institution for mental treatment outside your parish of registration and you are not interdicted and not judically declared incompetent.

        To request normal absentee ballots by mail, you must complete and return a request for absentee ballot indicating the reason you are not able to vote in person absentee or in person on Election Day.

        You may request an absentee ballot as early as 60 days prior to the election.

        Timeline to request an absentee ballot by mail

        • Military Personnel: Anytime before 4:30pm on the day before election day
        • US Citizens residing outside the US: Anytime beofre 4:30pm on the day before election day
        • Hospitalization: By 4:30pm on the day before election day
        • All others: Anytime before 4:30pm on the 4th day before election day

        Deadlines for returning your voted ballots

        • Military Personnel: By 8pm on election day
        • US citizens residing outside the US: By 8pm on election day
        • Hospitalization: By 8pm on election day
        • All others: By 4:30pm on the day before election day

        You are entitled to receive assistance while absentee voting if you are unable to read or unable to vote without assistance because of a physical handicap, including blindness. You may choose who assists you as long as they are not a candidate, employer, employer's agent or your union agent.

        Displaced voters can vote by mail or vote early in person at the registrar of voters office of their parish, or on election day at their precinct. Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        Absentee voting is easy and available for all voters in North Dakota. Absentee voting related forms include the following:

        Applications for absentee ballots may be delivered to the appropriate county auditor or election official by mail, in person, or by fax. For more information, please consult with your voting assistance officer, the Secretary of State's office, or your county auditor's.

        According to North Dakota law, absentee ballots are to be made available by the 40th day before the election. Absentee ballots must be returned and postmarked by the day before the election.

        To apply for an absentee ballot you must apply for an absent voter's ballot on a form furnished by the proper officer of the county, city, or school district where you generally reside, or on any blank sheet of paper containing the following information:

        • Your name
        • Your most current or most recent ND residential address
        • Your mailing address
        • Your current home telephone number
        • The election for which the ballot is being requested
        • The date of the request
        • An affirmation that you have resided in the precinct for at least 30 days
        • Your signature
        • Proper ID - see "ID Needed for Voting" section for more information

        Some Special Circumstances to consider:

        In North Dakota, you are not required to provide a reason when requesting a ballot to vote absentee.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        To qualify for an absentee ballot, you must be:

        • Absent from your county of residence on Election Day and during the early voting period
        • Sick or have a disability that prevents you from voting in person without assistance
        • 65 or older
        • Confined to jail serving a misdemeanor sentence; or confined to jail without bail pending trial for a felony or appeal of a felony conviction

        You must request an application for ballot by mail (ABBM) from an early voting clerk in the county where you are registered, or from the secretary of state's office. Once received, read the instructions carefully, complete the ABBM form and return to the early voting clerk in your county by mail, common carrier or fax. The application must be received by the early voting clerk between the 60th day and the seventh day before an election (or the last business day before the seventh day if it falls on a weekend or a holiday.)

        The Early Voting Clerk must receive your marked ballot by 7pm on Election Day or by the 5th day after Election Day if your ballot is submitted from outside the US.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can find information on how to register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        To vote absentee, you must submit an affidavit to request a ballot and swear or affirm that you are unable to go to your regular polling place during the election. The affidavit can be obtained by phoning or writing the Department of Elections in your county or by downloading it from the Delaware Secretary of State website. Facsimile transmissions of affidavits are acceptable, but actual ballots will not be faxed or e-mailed to you. In some cases the affidavit (but not the ballot) must be notarized.

        Requests for affidavits that require notarization:

        • Work: The nature of your business or occupation, including students living out of county of their residence
        • Vacation
        • Religion: The tenets or teaching of your religion preclude voting on Election Day
        • Public Service: Your service to the United States or to the State of Delaware prevents you from going to your polling place. Spouses or dependents of the person in service also qualify.
        • Illness
        • Disability: You are permanently or temporarily disabled
        • Incarceration: you are incarcerated but not a convicted felon

        The absentee ballot is usually mailed out 35 days before a primary and 45 days before a general election. When returning the absentee ballot remember to read all the instructions and to sign and date the voucher and envelope. All absentee ballots must be recieved by noon the day before the election. If it is received after this deadline but before the close of the polls on Election Day then the ballot will only count for federal offices.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can find information on how to register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Absentee Ballot Process

        There is no specific deadline to request an absentee ballot. Ballots are available 46 days before an election

        Completed mail ballots must be received by your county auditor no later than the day before Election Day. Any voter may vote absentee in any election they choose.

        With absentee voting, you can vote either in person before Election Day at a location designated by your county elections official, online or by mail. You must submit a written application to your county auditor. Call your county auditor for details. To vote by mail, submit the absentee ballot application form to your county auditor. The ballot will then be mailed directly to you.

        You do not need to be registered to vote to request an absentee ballot. A voter registration application will be included in the materials. You must show your witness an accepted proof of residence when registering.

        To find out where your absentee ballot is in the process, please use your state's absentee ballot lookup.

        Overseas citizens and U.S. military personnel can register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot and you want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependent of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

        If you have filled out your ballot want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Overseas and Military Voters

        You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependant of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

         

        If you have filled out your ballot and want to use express delivery, you can use the Overseas Vote Foundation's Express Your Vote resource for discounted shipping rates and reliable tracking.

        If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

        Early Voting

        Early voting is avaiable between 8am and 6pm Monday through Friday and 10am to 4pm on Saturdsays. Early voting ends at 5pm on Monday, November 5. To find your early voting locations check your local newspaper or contact your county clerk.

        Depending on the type of election being conducted, you may early vote during the 7 or 15 days prior to Election Day. For more information check your state's resource.

        Early Voting

        You are able to vote in person after November 1st, 2012 if you meet any of these special circumstances:

        • An unexpected absence from the municipality during the entire time the polls are open on election day;
        • A physical disability,
        • An inability to travel to the polls because the voter is a resident of a coastal island ward or precinct; or
        • An incapacity or illness that has resulted in the voter being unable to leave home or a treatment facility.

        This special circumstances application must be signed by the voter. This application can be obtained from your municipal clerk or from the Secretary of State.

        You may vote absentee at the clerk's office as soon as absentee ballots are available. Absentee ballots are available 30 to 45 days before the election at the municipal clerk's office. You do not need to complete an application if you vote in person at the municipal clerk's office.

        Early Voting

        Early voting starts the day after the close of voter registration for any election, 29 days before the election. For specific information on times and locations contact your board of elections.

        For the Tuesday, November 4th General Election the below are the early voting dates and hours. Contact your board of elections for locations.

        • 8am to 5pm, Tuesday October 7 - Friday October 10
        • 8am to 5pm, Tuesday October 14 - Friday October 17
        • 8am to 5pm, Monday October 20 - Friday October 24
        • 8am to 4pm, Saturday October 25
        • 8am to 5pm, Monday October 27 - Friday October 31
        • 8am to 4pm, Saturday November 1
        • 1pm to 5pm, Sunday November 2
        • 8am to 2pm, Monday November 3

        Early Voting

        Early voting for the Tuesday, November 4, 2014 General Election begins Tuesday, October 21st and ends on Friday, October 31st.

        To find your early voting locations, please visit your state's website.

        In person early voting is allowed and no excuse is required. The polls will be open for at least 4 hours each early voting day and will close at 5pm on the last early voting day.

        In order to vote during the early voting period, you must show a valid voter ID. This is either a form of ID that has you name and photo or two forms of ID that bear your name and show evidence of your residence. To see the complete list of acceptable ID, please visit your state's website.

         

        Early Voting

        Early voting information for the District of Columbia can be found on the DC Board of Elections site.

        Early Voting

        Early voting does not exist in Mississippi. However, you may vote absentee ballot in person at your local circuit clerk's office (office hours vary, check with your local clerk's office). Check with your county clerk for absentee in person voting dates for the next election.

        Early Voting

        For more information about early voting locations, check our your state's resource.

        Early voting is available from the 3rd Monday before the election through the 3rd day preceding the election. An election authority will publish the location of each permanent and temporary polling place for early voting and the dates and hours that early voting will be conducted at each location.

        Early Voting

        New Hampshire does not have early voting.

        Early Voting

        Early voting is available through Pennsylvania's absentee ballot process.

        Early Voting

        Early voting is available in Arizona. In-Person Early Voting begins 33 days before Election Day for the Primary and General Election, and ends at 5:00 pm on the Friday before Election Day. A voter may vote early in person at the County Recorder's office or on-site voting locations designated by the county recorder.

        A voter may also vote early by mail. An elector may make a request by telephone, mail, or email to the County Recorder for an official early ballot beginning 93 days before an election. Early ballots are mailed to voters requesting an early mail-in ballot beginning 33 days before the Primary and General Elections. Early voting for the Presidential Preference Election begins 26 days before the election. The deadline for requesting an early ballot to be mailed is 5:00 p.m. on the second Friday before the election. If the request is oral (in person or by telephone), the requesting elector shall provide the date of birth and state or country of birth or other information that if compared to the voter registration information on file will confirm the identity of the elector. Requests in writing should include the voter's name and address as registered, birth date, election for which the ballot is requested, address where the ballot is to be mailed, and signature.The voter's signature on the early ballot affidavit is compared to the voter's signature on the voter's registration form.

        Early ballots will be counted if returned to the County Recorder or other officer in charge of elections by 7:00 p.m. on Election Day. County Recorders' offices will remain open until 7:00 p.m. on Election Day to accept early ballots. Early ballots may also be dropped off at any polling place in the voter's county of residence no later than 7:00 p.m. on Election Day.

        Emergency early voting is permitted if an unforeseen circumstance occurs that would prevent an elector from voting at the polling place. Voters who encounter an emergency occurring after 5:00 p.m. on the second Friday before the election should contact their County Recorder for the procedure for emergency early voting.

        Early Voting

        For more information on locations, please use your state's resource.

        You do not need a reason to vote early. All voters may vote early, just like they are voting on election day.

        Voters who want to vote early for any election may do so in person at their parish Registrar of Voters office or at designated locations in the parish from 14 days to seven days before any scheduled election. For more information on dates and locations for early voting, please use your state's resource.

        Early Voting

        Early voting is available and no excuse is required. Please check with local county election officials for specific dates and times.

        Early Voting

        To find your location, contact your early voting election official.

        In person early voting is available to any registered voter in Texas beginning on the 17th day (12th day before a May election) before an election  - unless it's a weekend then early voting starts on Monday, and ending on the fourth day before Election Day. No excuse is needed to vote early in person. Early voting in person is conducted in the building that houses the office of the County Clerk or City Secretary, or in a place designated by the County Commissioners or City Council.

        • Early voting is conducted on weekdays during business hours for eight hours, or for three hours if the territory covered by the election has less than 1,000 people.
        • Counties with a population over 100,000 people must conduct early voting for 12 hours on weekdays of the last week of early voting.
        • If your county has less than 100,000 people, it must have extended hours if requested by 15 registered voters.
        • Counties with a population over 100,000 people must conduct early voting for 12 hours on the last Saturday of early voting, and for five hours on the last Sunday.
        • If your county has less than 100,000 people, the authority conducting the election may order early voting on one or more Saturdays or Sundays, and determine the hours. They must offer this if it is requested by 15 registered voters.

        Early Voting

        You may vote by absentee ballot in-person at your local election official's office. Contact the local your local election official's office to deterrmine when absentee ballots will be available and the hours for voting. Be sure to take proof of identity with you when you go to vote.

        Early Voting

         Voting takes place at your county auditor's office or in your city or township clerks office. For more information on times and locations, contact your county auditor.

        In person absentee voting is allowed but an excuse is required. An eligible voter may vote by absentee ballot during the 46 days before the election in the office of the county auditor and at any other polling place designated by the county auditor. To vote in person, apply and/or vote during normal office hours or from 10:00 am to 3:00 pm the Saturday before the election or from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm the Monday before the election. To vote by mail, submit the absentee ballot application form to your county auditor. The ballot will then be mailed directly to you.

         

         

        Early Voting

        Voting before election day at an absentee polling place is available. Contact your county clerk for dates, times and location of the absentee polling place in your county. See Absentee Ballot section above.

        For information on time and locations please contact your county clerk.

        Early Voting

        Early voting is available for all registered voters. Please contact your local county clerk's office for specific dates and times.

        Early Voting

        You may vote absentee in person 15 days before an election at all 40 regional elections' offices and you can vote at the airport absentee voting stations on Election Day from 7:00am to 8:00pm.

        Early Voting

        A voting machine is available at your county clerk's office 12 (or more) working days before the election for you to vote early if you are qualified. You must fulfill one of the below criteria in order to be eligible:

        • You will be out of the county on Election Day
        • You are a student or resident who temporarily resides outside of the county
        • You have surgery scheduled and will require hospitalization on Election Day
        • You are a spouse of a voter who is having surgery on Election day
        • You are a pregnant woman in your third trimester
        • You are a precinct election officer appointed to serve in precinct other than your own, an alternate precinct officer, a county board of elections member, a county board of elections member of staff, a deputy county clerk, or a state board of elections member of staff

        Early Voting

        One-stop absentee voting (early voting) begins on the second Thursday before the election and ends at 1pm the last Saturday before the election. One-stop absentee voting takes place at either the County Board of Elections office or an alternate site if the County Board office is not able to handle in-person voting.

        You may change your name or address at a one-stop voting site, but you if you are not registered to vote in that county you may not register to vote during early voting.

        For specific locations of where you can vote, please contact your county board of elections.

         

        Early Voting

        Early voting is available and no excuse is required. The early voting period for generally begins 20 days before an election and ends 5 days prior to the Election Day. You should bring your voter registration card plus an acceptable photo ID when you vote early. However, in a city election where there is not any opposition on the ballot, early voting begins 10 days before the election. 

        For more information on early voting, contact your local county election commission office.

         

        Early Voting

        For more information on times and locations contact your county clerk.

        In person absentee voting takes place at the county clerk office 40 days before an election. It is not available on election day.

        Early Voting

        Early voting is not available.

        Early Voting

        Early Voting is not available.

        Early Voting

        In person early voting takes place at the offices of your city or county clerk.

        Early voting is available in the form of in person absentee voting. Please remember to bring proper identification when you arrive at walk-in polling places to cast your early vote. Absentee walk-in polling places are located at the offices of the city or county clerk where you reside. Contact your city/county clerk's office for more information.

        Early Voting

        For more infromation on times and locations, contact your county clerk.

        Early voting is available from 35 days before the election until the Monday before Election Day. For more information on early voting, please see the section on Absentee Ballot Process.

        Early Voting

        For more information on times and locations please contact your county clerk.

        You may vote in person at your county elections office starting the Tuesday before Election Day, or up to 20 days before the election, depending on the county. Some counties offer satelite voting sites during the 20-day advance voting period. To find such locations, contact your county election office.

        Early Voting

        In person absentee voting begins as soon as the ballots are available at least 30 days before an election and ends on Election Day. In person absentee voting is conducted during the above period, at the board of elections' borough offices. Operating hours are from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm except on Election Day, when they are open until 9:00 pm.

        Early Voting

        Voters who qualify to vote absentee may also go to the office of the county auditor, complete an absentee ballot application and vote in the office.

        Early Voting

        For more information on times and locations contact your local election official.

        Early voting is available in the form of in person absentee voting.

        You can request an absentee ballot in person at your municipal clerk's office up until 5:00 pm on the Friday before the election. The completed ballot must be received by the municipal clerk no later than the day of the election so that it can be delivered to the polling location by 8:00 pm.

        Early Voting

        For more information of times and locations for early voting, contact your county clerk.

        Early voting is available and no excuse is required. Each county clerk and recorder shall provide one or more early voting polling place(s), each of which shall be accessible to persons with disabilities. Early voting is available to any eligible elector during regular business hours for 10 days before a primary election and for 15 days before a November election conducted by the county clerk and recorder. Information regarding early voting availability, locations, and schedules may be obtained by visiting your county website or by contacting your county clerk and recorder's office.

        Early Voting

        Absentee in-person balloting is available to those who are allowed to vote by absentee ballot. In Massachusetts you may vote absentee for one of the following three reasons only:

        • You will be absent from your city or town on Election Day
        • You have a physical disability preventing you from voting at the polling place
        • Your religious beliefs prevent you from voting on Election Day.

        You must be registered in order to vote absentee. However, those residing overseas and members of the armed forces or merchant marines, or their spouses or dependents, do not need to be registered to vote absentee.

        If you cast your ballot at the clerk's office before Election Day, plan to visit the office two or three weeks before the election. You can fill out your application and cast your vote in one visit. Call your clerk's office to make certain that the absentee ballots are available. Absentee ballots should be available three weeks before an election.

        Early Voting

        You can vote early and in person at your county elections office. Please contact them for specific dates and times

        Early Voting

        For more information on times and locations please contact your local registrar.

        To qualify for absentee in-person voting you must be:

        • Any person who, in the regular and orderly course of his business, profession, or occupation or while on personal business or vacation, will be absent from the county or city in which he is entitled to vote;

        • Any person who is (i) a member of a uniformed service of the United States, as defined in 42 U.S.C. § 1973ff-6(7), on active duty, or (ii) a member of the merchant marine of the United States, or (iii) who temporarily resides outside of the United States, or (iv) the spouse or dependent residing with any person listed in (i), (ii), or (iii), and who will be absent on the day of the election from the county or city in which he is entitled to vote. See Absentee Voting Procedures for Overseas Personnel (Military & Non-Military)

        • Any student attending a school or institution of learning, or his spouse, who will be absent on the day of election from the county or city in which he is entitled to vote;

        • Any person who is unable to go in person to the polls on the day of election because of a disability, illness or pregnancy ;

        • Any person who is confined while awaiting trial or for having been convicted of a misdemeanor, provided that the trial or release date is scheduled on or after the third day preceding the election. Any person who is awaiting trial and is a resident of the county or city where he is confined shall, on his request, be taken to the polls to vote on election day if his trial date is postponed and he did not have an opportunity to vote absentee;

        • Any person who is a member of an electoral board, registrar, officer of election, or custodian of voting equipment;

        • Any person serving as a designated representative of a political party, independent candidate or candidate in a political party;

        • Any duly registered person who is unable to go in person to the polls on the day of the election because he is primarily and personally responsible for the care of an ill or disabled family member who is confined at home.

        • Any duly registered person who is unable to go in person to the polls on the day of the election because of an obligation occasioned by his religion.

        • Any person who, in the regular and orderly course of his business, profession, or occupation, will be at his place of work and commuting to and from his home to his place of work for eleven or more hours of the thirteen that the polls are open (6:00 AM to 7:00 PM).

        • Certain first responders who meet code definitions for law-enforcement officers, firefighters, search and rescue personnel and emergency medical services personnel.

        • Any registered and qualified voter may request a mail ballot for presidential and vice-presidential electors only by writing across the top of their absentee application "request ballot for presidential electors only." A voter who votes a "presidential only" ballot may not later decide to vote the rest of the ballot. The same procedures and deadlines apply as for other absentee applications and ballots. Please note: When completing your absentee ballot application, reason 7A should only be used by voters who have moved to another state (away from Virginia) less than 30 days before the presidential election. This reason code should not be selected by voters that do not intend to move to another state less than 30 days prior to the election.

        The electoral board will usually make ballots available for absentee voting 45 days prior to Election Day and ending 3 days before Election Day.

        Early Voting

        Early voting for the July 22nd Primary Run-off Election is June 30 - July 18.  You can find your Early Voting locations here.

        Information for the Run-Off:

        • If you did not vote in the primary election, you cannot vote in the run-off
        • If you selected a Democrat or Republican ballot in the primary, you must vote that same ballot choice for the run-off

        To find your early voting locations, visit your state resource.

        Any voter registered in Georgia may vote absentee in person. This allows you to vote on a day and time that is convenient for you. Beginning the 4th Monday prior to Election, simply visit your county or municipality early voting site, fill out the application and present one of the permitted forms of photo ID. As Election Day approaches, your county may have multiple early voting sites and even extended hours. Voting times and locations for your precinct can be found here.

        Please note that you cannot vote on the day immediately preceding the Tuesday election. Traditional polling places will be open on Election Day. However, if you choose to advance vote you cannot cast another ballot at your precinct on Election Day.

        Early Voting

        Montana allows in-person absentee voting that allows electors to vote as soon as absentee ballots are avaiable. Early in-person absentee ballots will be avaiable no later than 30 days before an election and will not be counted until Election Day. Voting takes place at your local elections office. For more information about times and locations please contact your local election officials.

         

        Early Voting

        Early voting is not available in Alabama.

        Early Voting

        Early voting is available in Iowa beginning 40 days before an election. Early voting is completed in the county auditor's office and the last day to cast an early vote is the Monday before an election.

        Early Voting

        Early voting for the Tuesday, November 4, 2014 General Election takes place at the following times:

        Early, in-person voting at County Clerk offices: Tuesday, October 7 - Saturday, November 1.

        Early voting at alternative sites: Saturday, November 18 - Saturday, November 1.

        For more information on times and locations please contact your county clerk.

        You may vote early in-person, instead of voting by mail. You may go to your county clerk's office beginning the 28th day before the election and vote on either a paper ballot or electronic voting machine.

        Early voting at alternate sites begins on the third Saturday before the election. Call your county clerk for locations.

        If you become ill after the period for absentee balloting and are unable to go to the polls, you may request a ballot in writing. Your request must be signed by your health care provider. Your ballot will be given to the person who presents the request to the county clerk and shall be returned by the same person.

        Early Voting

        You can vote early in person by visiting your county voter registration office and completing an application for absentee ballot. You may then vote absentee in person until 5pm on the day before the election.

        Early Voting

        Contact your county clerk for more information on times and locations.

        The County Clerk is responsible for early voting. The locations will be in the County Courthouse, annex or on the property of the courthouse. The regular period of early voting begins 13 days before the election and ends 3 days before the election. Voting is avaiable during regular business hours and on any Saturday on or between the 13th and 3rd days before the election.

         

        Early Voting

         

        California voters can vote early by using the vote-by-mail system. Any registered voter may vote using a vote-by-mail ballot instead of going to the polls on Election Day.

        All valid vote-by-mail ballots are counted in every election in California, regardless of the outcome or closeness of any race. For additional information on how and when ballots are verified and tabulated, please visit our description of how the official canvass of the vote is completed.

        Once your application is processed by your county elections official, your ballot will be sent to you. After you have voted, insert your ballot in the envelope provided, making sure you complete all required information on the envelope. You may return your voted vote-by-mail ballot by 1) mailing it to your county elections official; 2) returning it in person to a polling place or the elections office in your county on Election Day; or 3) authorizing a relative or person living in the same household as you to return the ballot on your behalf. Regardless of how the ballot is returned, it MUST be received by the county elections office by the time polls close at 8:00 p.m. on Election Day. Late-arriving vote-by-mail ballots will not be counted.

        Early Voting

        For Early Voting locations, please use your state's resource or contact your local board of elections.

        Early voting starts the 2nd Saturday before election day and runs through Thursday before the election. Early voting centers will be open continuously from 10 am to 8 pm each day, except for the Sunday during this time period, when they will be open 12 pm to 6 pm.

         

        Early Voting

        In person absentee voting will be available at your County Election Board on Thursday (8am to 6pm), Friday (8am to 6pm) before each election. If it is a Federal or State election, in person absentee voting will also be available on the Saturday (9am to 2pm) before the election.

        For more information on times and locations contact your county clerk.

         

        Early Voting

        Early voting is also available in Vermont with no excuse required. You may vote at your town clerk's office in person any time 45 days before a primary or general election or twenty days before a municipal election.

        Early Voting

        Florida state early voting, at a minimum, begins 10 days before an election and ends on the third day before an election. During this period, early voting is conducted no less than 8 hours but not more than 12 hours per day on each day during the period. Supervisors of Elections designate early voting sites 30 days before an election, contact your Supervisor of Elections for locations in your county.

        Voters who want to vote early should remember to bring a photo and signature ID with them. Contact your Supervisor of Elections for dates, times and locations in your county.

         

        Early Voting

        You can early vote in the office of the local election authority until 5:00 pm the night before the election.

        Early Voting

        Early voting takes place at your local board of elections locations.

        In-person early voting can be done at your board of elections beginning 29 days before Election Day and no later than 12:00 pm on the day before Election Day.

        Early Voting

        There is no in person early voting for New Jersey. To vote early please see Absentee Ballot information above.

        Early Voting

        Early Voting is not available in Rhode Island.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The Registration deadline is Monday, October 20, 2014

        Please utilize your state's resource for information on local elections.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information about 2013 local elections.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Tuesday, October 14, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information about 2013 local elections.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Friday, October 10, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for more information.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Wednesday, October 29, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for more information.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General). The registration deadline is Monday, October 6, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information.

        Election Dates

        The next election date is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Wednesday, October 8, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information about 2014 local elections.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Monday, October 6, 2014.

        For more information about your local elections please contact your local Board of Elections.

         

         

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, September 30, 2014. The registration deadline is Tuesday, September 9, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information about 2014 local elections.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Sunday, October 5, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information about local elections.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Monday, October 6, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for more information.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Tuesday, October 14, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information about 2014 local elections.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Monday, October 6, 2014

        Contact your local Board of Elections for more information.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The in-person registration deadline is Monday, October 20, 2014. Mailed registrations must be postmarked by Monday, October 6, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information about 2014 local elections.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Monday, October 6, 2014. Election Day registration is available.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information about 2014 local elections.

        Election Dates

        The next election date is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Saturday, October 4, 2014 at noon.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information about 2014 local elections.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Tuesday, October 7, 2014.

        For more election information contact your county clerk.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). Mailed registration applications must be received by Saturday, October 25, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for more information.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The Registration deadline is Monday, October 6, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information about local elections.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Monday, October 6, 2014.

        To plan ahead check your state's election calendar or contact your county recorder or Local League of Women Voters for more information.

         

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Monday, October 6, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information about 2013 local elections.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). No registration is required.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information about 2014 local elections.

        Election Dates

        The next election is on Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Monday, October 6, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information about 2014 local elections.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Saturday, October 11, 2014.

        For more election information contact your county clerk.

        Election Dates

        The next election date is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Wednesday, October 15, 2014.

        To find out information about local elections contact your local League of Women Voters or contact your local Board of Elections.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The in person registration deadline is Monday, October 27, 2014. Mailed registration applications must be postmarked by Monday, October 6, 2014. You may also register online until Monday October 6, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for more information.

        Election Dates

        The next election date is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Friday, October 10, 2014. Election day registration is avaiable.

        For more election information contact your county clerk.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The in person registration deadline is Tuesday, October 14, 2014. The online registration deadline is also Tuesday, October 14, 2014. Mailed registration applications must be postmarked by Sunday, October 5, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information about 2014 local elections.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, October 7, 2014 (Regional Education Attendance Area). The in person registration deadline is Sunday, September 7, 2014).

        Please check your local city/boroughs for local election calendar or contact your local elections office for more information on local elections. You may also contact your local league of women voters.

         

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Monday, October 6, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information about 2013 local elections.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Friday, October 10, 2014. You may register in person during the early voting period. For more information please see the "Registration Deadline" question above.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information about 2014 local elections.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election) The registration deadline is Monday, October 6, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for more information.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Monday, October 20, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information about local elections.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The in person registration deadline is Tuesday, October 28, 2014. Mailed registartions must be postmarked by Tuesday, October 21, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information about 2014 local elections.

         

         

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Monday, October 6, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information about 2013 local elections.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Monday, October 6, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information about local elections.

         

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The in person registration deadline is Friday, October 24, 2014. Mailed registration applications must be postmarked by Friday, October 17, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information about 2014 local elections.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Tuesday, October 14, 2014.

        For more election information contact your local Board of Elections.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Friday, October 10, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for more information.

        Check your state's resource for local election dates and information, or check with your local League of Women Voters.

         

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014. The registration deadline is Monday, October 20, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information about 2014 local elections.

        Election Dates

        The next election will be Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Wednesday, October 15, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information about 2013 local elections.

         

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline for mailed applications is Tuesday, October 14, 2014. Online regirstion ends on Monday, October 27, 2014. Election day registration is available at the polling center.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information about 2014 local elections.

         

         

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Primary). The registration deadline is Wednesday, October 15, 2014.

        For more information about elections visit your election center or contact your local board of elections.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014. The registration deadline is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election).

        Contact your local Board of Elections for more information.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election) The registration deadline is Tuesday, October 14, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information about local elections.

         

        Election Dates

        The next election date is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Monday, October 6, 2014.

        For more election information contact your county clerk.

         

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Monday, October 6, 2014.

        Check your state's resource for more information on local election dates and information.

         

        Election Dates

        The next election will be Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Tuesday, October 21, 2014.

        For more information about elections visit your official election center or contact your local board of elections.

         

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General election). The registration deadline is Saturday, October 25, 2014 (by 5pm). Election Day Registration is available.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information about 2014 local elections.

        Please utilize your state's resource for information on local elections.

        Election Dates

        The next election date is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Tuesday, October 7, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information about 2014 local elections.

        Election Dates

        The next election is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Saturday, October 4, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information about 2014 local elections.

        Election Dates

        The next election date is Tuesday, November 4, 2014 (General Election). The registration deadline is Tuesday, October 14, 2014.

        Contact your local Board of Elections for information about 2014 local elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Georgia:

        • You must be at least 16 years of age
        • You must be a resident of the county that you apply for
        • You must complete required training
        • You will be entitled to compensation

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Montana:

        • You must be registered to vote in Montana
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • You must be a resident of the precinct
        • You must complete required training

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Alabama:

        • You must be registered to vote in Alabama
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • You must be a resident of the precinct
        • You must state your political affiliation
        • You must complete the required training
        • You will be entitled to compensation

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Iowa:

        • You must be registered to vote in Iowa
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • Political affiliation required
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • Must be a resident of the county
        • You must complete required training
        • High school junior and senior students may work if they meet certain statutory requirements

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in New Mexico:

        • You must be registered to vote in New Mexico
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • Political affiliation considered
        • You must be a resident of the precinct
        • You must complete required training
        • Messengers and translators may also be appointed

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in South Carolina:

        • You must be registered to vote in South Carolina
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • You must be a resident of the county 30 days prior to the election
        • You must complete required training
        • Students 16 years or older may serve as poll manager's assistant

        You will be entitled to compensation

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in West Virginia:

        • You must be 18 years of age by the time of the next election:
        • You must be a resident of West Virginia
        • You must be registered to vote in the county you reside in
        • You must complete required training

        You will be entitled to compensation

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in California:

        • You must be registered to vote in California
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • You must be a resident of the precinct
        • You must complete required training
        • Students who are 16 years or older may work if they are in good standing with a GPA of a 2.5 and above

        You will be entitled to compensation To sign up, contact your local elections official.

         

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Maryland:

        • You must be registered to vote in Maryland
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • Political affiliation preferred
        • You must be a resident of the county
        • You must complete required training
        • Students 17 years old who meet all other voting requirements may be appointed

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Oklahoma:

        • You must be registered to vote in Oklahoma
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • Political affiliation required
        • You must be a resident of the county for the 25 days prior to the election
        • You must complete required training every two years

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Vermont:

        • You must be registered to vote in Vermont
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • Political affiliation considered
        • You must be a resident of the voting district
        • You must complete required training
        • Students who are 16 and 17 years old may be appointed as assistant elections officers

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in the state of Florida:

        • You must be registered to vote in Florida
        • You must be at least 18 years of age or 17 and pre registered
        • You must be a resident of the county
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • You must complete required training

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Missouri:

        • You must be registered to vote in Missouri
        • You must be at least 17 years and 6 months
        • Political affiliation preferred
        • You must be a resident of the jurisdiction
        • You must complete required training
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • Students 15-17 years old must have full time attendance in a Missouri school

        To sign up fill out his form or check with your local county board .

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Indiana:

        • You must be registered to vote in Indiana
        • You must be at least 18 years of age (or 16/17 if participating in Election Day Live)
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • You must be a resident of the precinct for the 30 days prior to the election
        • You must complete required training

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in New Jersey:

        • You must be registered to vote in New Jersey
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • Political affiliation generally required
        • You must be a resident of the county
        • You must complete required training every 2 years
        • Students 16 or older who meet all other voter requirements may be appointed if they are enrolled in high school and have a written note from a parent or if they graduated from high school and have passed a general education development test

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Rhode Island:

        • You must be registered to vote in Rhode Island
        • Able to read the Consitution of the sate in English
        • Able to write his/her own name

        You are ineligible to be a poll worker if:

        • You are a candidate for public office
        • Have been convicted, found guilty, pleaded guilty or nolo contendere, or placed on a deferred or suspended sentence, or on probation for any crime which involves moral turpitude or which constitutes a violation of any of the election or caucus laws of this or any state
        • Are a federal, state, municipal employee - except teacher - only in primary elections

        To sign up, contact your local board of canvassers.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Arkansas:

        • You must be registered to vote in Arkansas
        • You must be at least 18 years of age or a high school student
        • You must be a resident of the precinct 31 days prior to the election
        • You must complete the training
        • You will be entitled to compensation

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Maine:

        • You must be registered to vote in Maine
        • You must be at least 18 years of age; except students 17 or older may work at the polls as student election clerks for specific elections
        • You must attend training at least once every two years
        • You might be entitled to compensation, depeding on the jurisdiction

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

         

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Ohio:

        • You must be registered to vote in the county in which you plan to work
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • You must be a resident of the county and state for the 30 days prior to the election
        • You must complete required training
        • You must not have been convicted of a felony
        • You cannot be running as a candidate for the election in which you are working
        • Students 17 years old must be a country resident and enrolled in senior year of high school to be appointed

        You will be entitled to compensation

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Utah:

        • You must be registered to vote in Utah
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • Political affiliation generally required
        • You must be a resident of the county for the 30 days prior to the election
        • You must complete required training

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in the District of Columbia:

        • You must be registered to vote in the District of Columbia
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • You must be a resident of the District for the 30 days prior to the election
        • You must complete required training
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • Students with residency in the District of Columbia who are 16 years or older may work if they are enrolled in a high school

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Mississippi:

        • You must be registered to vote in Mississippi
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • You must be a resident of the county
        • You must complete required training
        • Students 16 or older who are enrolled in high school and have residency in the county or municipality may work with a recommendation from the principal

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Illinois:

        • You must be registered to vote in Illinois
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • Political affiliation required
        • Term requirement of 2 years
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • You must be a resident of the precinct for the 30 days prior to the election
        • You must complete required training
        • Students with citizenship who are 17 years old may work with written permission from a parent or guardian and school principal and must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in New Hampshire:

        • You must be registered to vote in New Hampshire
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • Political affiliation required
        • You must be a resident of the voting district
        • You must complete required training
        • Students who are 17 years of age may be appointed at the central polling place in state elections

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Pennsylvania:

        • You must be registered to vote in Pennsylvania
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • You must be a resident of election district for the 30 days prior to the election.
        • Students enrolled in a high school who are 17 years old with residency in the county may be appointed with written permission from a parent or guardian and school principal

        You will be entitled to compensation

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Arizona:

        • You must be registered to vote in Arizona (unless participating in student program)
        • You must be at least 16 years of age
        • You must be a U.S. Citizen
        • You must complete the required training
        • Students with citizenship who are 16 years or older may work with parental permission
        • You will be entitled to compensation

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Louisiana:

        • You must be registered to vote in Louisiana
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • Political affiliation required
        • You must be a resident of election precinct
        • You must complete required training
        • Students who are at least 17 years of age who are otherwise a qualified voter may work if they are registered as a high school senior
        • College students may choose to register to vote in either the state they are attending school or the place they reside when they are not in school

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in North Dakota:

        • You must be registered to vote in North Dakota
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • Political affiliation required
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • You must be a resident of the precinct for the 30 days prior to the election
        • You must complete required training
        • Students 16 or 17 years old who meet all other voter requirements may be appointed if they are students in good standing at a North Dakota high school

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Texas:

        • You must be registered to vote in Texas
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • Political affiliation generally required
        • You must be a resident of the precinct for 30 days prior to the election
        • You must complete required training

        You will be entitled to compensation

        For information about student elections clerks, aged 16 or older, visit your state resource.

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Delaware:

        • You must be registered to vote in Delaware
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • Political affiliation generally required
        • You must be a resident of the election district for the 30 days prior to the election
        • You must complete required training
        • High school students with residency in the state who are 16 years or older may work with written permission from a parent or guardian and school principal
        • College students with at least part time enrollment in their college or university can work within the respected county

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Minnesota:

        • You must be registered to vote in Minnesota
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • Political affiliation required
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • You must be a resident of the state 20 days prior to the election
        • You must complete required training
        • Students 16 years or older who are registered in High school may work with written permission from a parent or guardian

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        Washington has a vote by mail process and does not have traditional polling places that require staffing by poll workers. To find out how you can volunteer on Election Day, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Idaho:

        • Political affiliation preferred
        • It is recommended that you are a resident of the election district for the 30 days prior to the election
        • You must complete required training
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • Students with citizenship who are 17 years old may work

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Nevada:

        • You must be registered to vote in Nevada
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • Political affiliation generally preferred
        • You must be a resident of the county
        • You must complete required training
        • Students 16 years or older who are enrolled in high school may be appointed if they meet all other voter requirements

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Alaska:

        • You must be registered to vote in Alaska
        • You must be at least 18 years of age; except students 16 or older may work at the polls if they are enrolled in public or private high school
        • You must be a resident of the precinct 30 days prior to the election
        • You must state your political affiliation
        • You will be entitled to compensation

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Kentucky:

        • You must be registered to vote in Kentucky
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • Political affiliation generally required. You cannot change your part affiliation for one year prior to your appointment as precinct officer.
        • You must be a resident of the precinct
        • You must complete required training
        • Each precinct allows one minor who is 17 years old to work. All minors who will turn 18 on the day or before the election may serve as an election officer
        • You cannot be a candidate during that election year or be related to a candidate in the precinct

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in North Carolina:

        • You must be registered to vote in North Carolina
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • Political affiliation generally required
        • You must be a resident of state and precinct for 30 days prior to the election
        • You must complete required training, exam and certification
        • Students 17 years of age with county residency may be appointed if they are enrolled in high school and have consent from a parent

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Tennessee:

        • You must be registered to vote in Tennessee
        • You must be at least 17 years of age to serve
        • Political affiliation generally preferred
        • You must be a resident of state house legislative district or county for the 30 days prior to the election
        • You must complete required training
        • Students who are 17 and meet all other voter registration requirements may be appointed

        You will be entitled to compensation

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Wyoming:

        • You must be registered to vote in Wyoming
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • Political affiliation generally required
        • You must be a resident of the county
        • You must complete required training
        • Students who are 16 years or older may be appointed if they meet all other voter requirements

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Connecticut:

        • You must be registered to vote in Connecticut
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • Political affiliation generally required
        • You must be a resident of the town that you apply
        • You must complete required training
        • Students with residency in the town who are 16 years or older may work with written permission from a parent or guardian

        To sign up, contact your local registrar's office.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Michigan:

        • You must be registered to vote in Michigan
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • Political affiliation required
        • You must be a resident of the county
        • You must complete required training
        • Students16 years or older who meet all other voter requirements may be appointed

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Hawaii:

        • You must be qualified to register to vote in Hawaii
        • You must be at least 16 years old by June 30th of the election year
        • Party affiliation generally required
        • You must be a resident of the precinct
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • New poll workers must complete required training

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Nebraska:

        • You must be registered to vote in Nebraska
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • Political affiliation generally required
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • You must be a resident of the precinct
        • You must complete required training
        • Students 16 years or older who meet all other voter requirements may be appointed

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Kansas:

        • You must be registered to vote in Kansas
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • Political affiliation required
        • You must be a resident of the area in which you will vote
        • You must complete required training
        • Students who are at least 16 years old and meet all other elector qualifications may be selected to serve

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in New York:

        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • You must be registered to vote in New York
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • Political affiliation required
        • You must be a resident of the county or in New York city must be a resident of the city
        • A training course and an exam must be completed
        • Students 16 or 17 years old who are enrolled in high school may be appointed
        • Translator positions also required

        To sign up visit your state's resource or contact your local board of elections .

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in South Dakota:

        • You must be registered to vote in South Dakota
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • You must be a resident of the county and precinct 15 days prior to the election
        • You must complete required training

        You will be entitled to compensation

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Wisconsin:

        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • Political affiliation generally required
        • You may be entitled to compensation
        • You must be a resident of election district for the 28 days prior to the election.
        • You must complete required training
        • Students 16 years or older who are enrolled in a high school with a minimum GPA of a 3.0 may work with written permission from a parent or guardian and school principal

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Colorado:

        • You must be registered to vote in Colorado
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • Political affiliation generally required
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • You must be a resident of the precinct 30 days before the election
        • You must complete required training
        • Students with citizenship who are 16 years or older may work with good standing in high school

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Massachusetts:

        • You must be registered to vote in Massachusetts
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • Political affiliation preferred
        • You must be a resident of the county or precinct
        • Two students who are 16 or 17 years old may be appointed if they meet all other voter requirements and get permission from a parent or principal

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        Oregon has a vote by mail process and does not have traditional polling places that require staffing by poll workers. To find out how you can volunteer on Election Day, contact your local board of elections.

        Poll Worker Information

        In order to be a poll worker in Virginia:

        • You must be registered to vote in Virginia
        • You will be entitled to compensation
        • You must be at least 18 years of age
        • Political affiliation generally required
        • You must complete required training.

        To sign up, contact your local board of elections.

        Polling Place Hours

        The polls will be open from 7:00 am to 6:00 pm.

        Polling Place Hours

        Polling locations will be open from 8:00 am to 8:00 pm central time and 7:00 am to 7:00 pm mountain time.

        Polling Place Hours

        Polling places are open from 7:00am to 7:00pm. All voters who are in line when the polls close are allowed to vote.

        Polling Place Hours

        The polling place will be open from 6:00 am to 9:00 pm.

        Polling Place Hours

        Polls will be open from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm. Any voter at the polling place prior to 7:00 pm is allowed to cast a ballot.

        Polling Place Hours

        The polls will be open 7:00 am to 8:00 pm.

        Polling Place Hours

        The polling place will be open from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm.

        Polling Place Hours

        For all elections, except local elections, the polls must be open from 7:00 am to 8:00 pm. Some polling places may open earlier than 7:00 am. If you are in line at the polls by 8:00 pm, you are entitled to vote. For the polling hours in a local election please contact your local election officials.

        Polling Place Hours

        You can still vote in person in Oregon. Each County Elections Office provides privacy booths for voters who want to vote in person or voters who need assistance.

        All ballots must be returned to a County Elections Office or designated drop site by 8pm on Election Day.

        Polling Place Hours

        Polls are open from 6:00 am to 7:00 pm.

        Polling Place Hours

        Polls are open from 7:00 am until 7:00 pm on Election Day. Any voter who is waiting in line to vote at 7:00 pm will be allowed to vote. Peak voting hours are historically from 7:00 am until 9:30 am, 4:30 pm until 7:00 pm, and during the mid-day lunch hour.

        Polling Place Hours

        Poll hours of operation vary. Polling places open between 7:00 am and 12:00 pm and close at 8:00 pm. Contact your local elections official for exact times.

        Polling Place Hours

        Alabama polling places are open from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm.

        Polling Place Hours

        Polls are open from 7:00 am to 9:00 pm.

        Polling Place Hours

        Polls will be open from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm on Election Day.

        Polling Place Hours

        The polls will be open from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm.

        Polling Place Hours

        The polling place will be open from 6:30 am to 7:30 pm.

        Polling Place Hours

        The polls will be open from 7:00 am to 8:00 pm.

        Polling Place Hours

        The polling place hours of operation are from 7:00 am to 8:00 pm.

        Polling Place Hours

        Polls will be open from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm.

        Polling Place Hours

        All polls are open from 10am to 7pm. Most polls open earlier.

        Polling Place Hours

        The polling place hours will be from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm.

        Polling Place Hours

        The polls will be open from 6:00 am to 7:00 pm.

        Polling Place Hours

        Polling places are open from 6:00 am to 6:00 pm on Election Day.

        Polling Place Hours

        Polls are open from 6:00 am to 8:00 pm.

        Polling Place Hours

        Most places will be open from 7:00 am to 8:00 pm. Opening hours may vary, but all polls close at 8:00 pm.

        Polling Place Hours

        The polls will be open from 7:30 am to 7:30 pm on Election Day. When the polls close, if you are in line, you will be permitted to vote.

        Polling Place Hours

        All polls open between 6am and 10pm depending on the population of the town. Local officials can give you the exact opening time for your community. All voting places close at 8pm on election day.

        Polling Place Hours

        The polls will be open from 6:30 am - 7:30 pm.

        Polling Place Hours

        Polls will be open from 7:00 am to 8 pm.

        Polling Place Hours

        The polls will be open from 7:00 am to 8:00 pm.

        Polling Place Hours

        Polls will be open from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm.

        Polling Place Hours

        The polls are open from 6:00 am to 7:00 pm.

        Polling Place Hours

        The polling place hours of operation vary in New Hampshire. In general, polling places open between 6:00 am and 11:00 am and close at 7:00 pm. Contact your local election officials for hours in your community.

        Polling Place Hours

        The polling place will be open from 7:00 am to 8:00 pm.

        Polling Place Hours

        Polling place hours are from 6:00 am to 7:00 pm.

        Polling Place Hours

        Polls will be open from 6:00 am to 8:00 pm.

        Polling Place Hours

        Most polls are open 7am- 7pm. Some polls may open earlier or close later. It is best to check with your local county election officials before Election Day.

        Polling Place Hours

        On election day the polling place will be open from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm.

        Polling Place Hours

        Polling place hours are 7:00 am to 8:00 pm. If you are in line waiting to vote at closing time, you may cast your vote even if it is done after 8:00 pm.

        Polling Place Hours

        Most polling places are open from 7:00 am to 8:00 pm. Please contact your county auditor or township clerk for details.

        Polling Place Hours

        Washington is a mail in ballot state and does not have polling places. Your county election officials can provide information about voting centers/election offices.

        Polling Place Hours

        Polls will be open from 8:00 am to 8:00 pm on Election Day.

        Polling Place Hours

        Polling place hours of operation are from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm.

        Polling Place Hours

        The polling place hours are from 7:00 am to 8:00 pm for Primary, General and Statewide Special Elections and 8:00am to 8:00am for Regional Educational Attendance Area (REAA) elections.

        Polling Place Hours

        Polls will be open from 6:00 am to 6:00 pm. All those in line by 6:00 pm will be able to vote.

        Polling Place Hours

        The polling place will be open from 6:30 am to 7:30 pm.

        Polling Place Hours

        Each county sets their own polling place hours. Contact your local elections commission to find out the times for your community.

        Polling Place Hours

        Polling place hours of operation are from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm.

        Polling Place Hours

        Polling places will be open from 6:00 am to 8:00 pm on Election Day.

        Polling Place Hours

        Polling places will be open from 7:00 am to 8:00 pm on Election Day.

        Time Off To Vote

        Employers must allow sufficient paid time off to vote for their employees, unless the employer has at least two consecutive hours to vote before or after his/her work hours.

        Time Off To Vote

        Employers must allow employees up to 2 hours paid leave to vote during their regular work shift. This time is unpaid unless specified otherwise by the employer.

        Time Off To Vote

        Time off to vote is subject to the employer. North Carolina state law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

        Time Off To Vote

        Employers must grant employees up to three hours paid leave to vote, unless polls are open three hours before or after regular working shift. Employees must request this time by noon the day before Election Day, and the employer may specify when during the working day employees may take time off.

        Time Off To Vote

        Employers must grant employees up to one hour of paid time off to vote during polling place hours, if the employee does not have 3 consecutive hours either before or after work that the polls are open.

        Time Off To Vote

        Time off to vote is subject to the employer. Connecticut law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

        Time Off To Vote

        Time off to vote is subject to the employer. Michigan law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

        Time Off To Vote

        Employers must grant employees two hours to vote, unless polls are open 2 consecutive hours before or after regular working shift. This time is paid, with proof that the vote has been cast.

        Time Off To Vote

        Employers must grant employees from one to two hours paid leave to vote, unless polls are open two consecutive hours before or after regular working shift. Employees must request this time prior to Election Day, and the employer may specify when during the working day employees may take time off.

        Time Off To Vote

        Any registered voter may leave work for a period of up to two hours to vote. If the polls are open before or after the work shift, the voter may only take such time off that, when added to the amount of time before or after work that the polls are open, it does not exceed two hours.

        Time Off To Vote

        Employers must grant employees sufficient time to vote, unless polls are open 4 hours before or after regular working shift. Employers may designate whether the time is to be taken at the beginning or end of the shift. Employees must notify employers of the need for time off not more than 10 days and not less than 2 days before the election. Employers must post a conspicuous notice of employee rights at least ten days before Election Day.

        Time Off To Vote

        Employees are entitled to paid leave on Election Day between the time the polls open and when they close, unless the person has two consecutive hours during the time the polls are open in which he or she can vote before or after work.

        Time Off To Vote

        Employers must grant employees up to three successive hours to vote on Election Day while the polls are open. The employee must notify the employer of his/her intended absence. The employer may designate the time of day for the absence.

        Time Off To Vote

        Employers must grant employees two hours of paid leave to vote, unless polls are open three hours before or after regular working shift.

        Time Off To Vote

        Voters employed in mechanical, manufacturing or mercantile businesses are allowed time off during the first two hours after the polls have opened only if an application for absence has been submitted.

        Time Off To Vote

        Time off to vote is subject to the employer. Virginia state law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

        Time Off To Vote

        Employers must grant employees two hours of paid leave to vote, unless polls are open 2 hours before or after regular working shift. This time may be paid depending on location.

        Time Off To Vote

        Time off to vote is subject to the employer. Montana state law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

        Time Off To Vote

        Time off to vote is available for those whose work hours exceed polling place hours. If not, employers are not required to give time off to vote. The necessary time off shall not exceed one hour. Whether this time is paid varies by town.

        Time Off To Vote

        Employers must grant employees three hours of paid leave to vote, unless polls are open three consecutive hours before or after regular working shift.

        Time Off To Vote

        Employers must grant employees up to two hours paid leave to vote, unless polls are open two consecutive hours before or three hours after regular working shift. The employer may designate the hours to be taken, but it may not include lunch or rest hours.

        Time Off To Vote

        Time off to vote is subject to the employer. South Carolina state law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

        Time Off To Vote

        West Virginia law states that private and public employers must give employees time off to vote, unless the employee has 3 hours nonworking time available to vote or the employee fails to vote.

        Time Off To Vote

        California law states that private and public employers must give employees time off to vote, unless the employee has two hours of nonworking time available to vote or employee fails to vote. Employees must give proper notice to their employer.

        Time Off To Vote

        Employers must grant employees up to two hours of paid leave to vote, unless polls are open 2 hours before or after regular working shift, or if employee has sufficient time to vote on his/her own. Employees must provide proof that they cast their vote to receive compensation for time off.

        Time Off To Vote

        Employees who begin their work less than 3 hours after the polls open and finish less than 3 hours before the polls close are entitled to 2 hours leave to vote. You must give notice the day before the election and must provide proof of voting to not have your pay reduced. The employer can set the time the employee can leave to vote.

        Time Off To Vote

        Time off to vote is subject to the employer. Vermont state law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

        Time Off To Vote

        Time off to vote is subject to the employer. Florida state law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

        Time Off To Vote

        Employers must grant employees up to three hours paid leave to vote, unless polls are open three consecutive hours before or after regular working shift. Employees must request this time prior to Election Day, and the employer may specify when during the working day employees may take time off.

        Time Off To Vote

        Time off to vote is subject to the employer. Indiana state law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

        Time Off To Vote

        Time off to vote is subject to the employer. New Jersey state law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

        Time Off To Vote

        Time off to vote is subject to the employer. Rhode Island law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

        Time Off To Vote

        Employer shall schedule sufficient time on election days so that employees may vote. This time varies by location.

        Time Off To Vote

        Time off to vote is subject to the employer. Maine state law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

        Time Off To Vote

        Employers are prohibited from firing an employee who takes a reasonable amount of time to vote. Salaried employees should be elegible for paid time off to vote. Specifications of time vary by employer.

        Time Off To Vote

        Employers must grant employees up to two hours of paid leave to vote, unless polls are open three outside of regular working shift. The employer may specify the hours during which the employee may be absent.

        Time Off To Vote

        Time off to vote is subject to the employer. District of Columbia law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

        Time Off To Vote

        Time off to vote is subject to the employer. Mississippi law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

        Time Off To Vote

        Every employee is entitled, after giving notice, to two hours off work, provided that the employee's working hours begin less than 2 hours after the opening of the polls and end less than 2 hours before the closing of the polls. The law does not specify whether time off is paid.

        Time Off To Vote

        Time off to vote is subject to the employer. New Hampshire state law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

        Time Off To Vote

        Time off to vote is subject to the employer. Pennsylvania state law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

        Time Off To Vote

        Employors are required to grant three hours of paid leave to vote, unless polls are open three hours before or after work shift.

        Time Off To Vote

        Time off to vote is subject to the employer. Louisiana state law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

        Time Off To Vote

        The law encourages employers to provide time off to vote when an employee's regular work schedule conflicts with the times polls are open. This policy however is voluntary.

        Time Off To Vote

        Employers must grant employees paid leave to vote on Election Day, unless polls are open two hours before or after regular working shift.

        Time Off To Vote

        Time off to vote is subject to the employer. Delaware law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

        Time Off To Vote

        Employees are allowed to take time off to vote during the mornings of election days. This time off should be treated as paid leave.

        Time Off To Vote

        Time off to vote is subject to the employer. Idaho law does not require employers to grant time off to vote for employees.

        Time Off To Vote

        Employers must grant employees up to three hours paid leave to vote, unless polls are open three consecutive hours before or after regular working shift. Employees must request this time prior to Election Day, and the employer may specify when during the working day employees may take time off.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can confirm your voting location by selecting from the following local resources: Arizona State Poll Locator Tool.

        If you have any further questios about your polling place please contact your County Clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource. If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource. If you have further questions regarding your polling place location, please contact your local elections official.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource. If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state's tool.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

         

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource. If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        Oregon is a vote by mail state. You can find you ballot drop box location by utilizing Oregon State's ballot drop off directory.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your County Elections Office .

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing VOTE411's poll locator tool or through your state's resource.

        You will be notified of your polling place with the Notice of Voter Registration and Address Confirmation (NVRAC) card which your county clerk will mail to you. The notice will state your voting precinct and polling place during the election and will confirm that you are properly registered to vote in the district and precinct where you live. A Notice of Voter Registration and Address Confirmation is sent to all registered voters at their residence address every election year. A Notice of Voter Registration and Address Confirmation is also sent after each reappointment and redistricting.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your local board of elections.

         

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        Colorado is a vote by mail state. If you have any questions please contact your local elections board.

        Polling Place Locator

        If you have questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your local election office.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource. If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        The board of registrars sends a certificate of registration to you that includes the address of your polling place. If you do not receive your certificate, or if you have further questions regarding your polling place location, please contact your local elections official.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing VOTE411's poll locator tool.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your local elections official.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your local board of elections.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource. If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

         

        Polling Place Locator

        You can confirm your voting location by selecting from the following local resources: Arkansas State Poll Locator Tool.If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource. If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource. Registered voters can cast their ballot at 143 voting precincts within the District.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Polling Place Locator

        You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

        If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your county clerk.

        Provisional Voting

        You will be required to cast a provisional ballot if:

        • You are completing a same-day registration application at the early voting center or at the polling place on Election Day
        • You changed your name and/or address and did not notify the Board of your change of name and/or address prior to voting at the early voting center or on Election Day.
        • You claim a different party than the one on the list of registered voters in the polling place (also known as the pollbook).
        • The pollbook shows that you already received an absentee ballot for this election or that you voted early
        • The pollbook indicates that you must show ID because the DMV-issued number or the last four digits of your social security number you provided could not be verified and you did not show ID before voting
        • Your right to vote was challenged and approved by the Precinct Captain
        • You voted during extended voting hours.
        • Your name is not on the pollbook.

        If you need to provide identification or other information to have your ballot counted, you have 10 days to provide it to the Board. Information about how to find out if your vote will be counted and how to appeal the Board's decision is provided to all provisional ballot voters at the polls.

        Provisional Voting

        Provisional ballots are eligible for verification if cast in the correct precinct.

        Provisional Voting

        An election judge will issue you a provisional ballot at your polling place if:

        • Your name does not appear on the lists of registered voters for the precinct
        • Your voting status has been challenged by an election judge, poll watcher or another voter and a majority of election judges agree
        • A court order is issued instructing your polling place to remain open after 7:00 pm (if this occurs everyone voting after 7:00 pm must cast a provisional ballot)
        • You are required to show identification because you registered by mail, but you did not bring ID to the polling place on Election Day or early voting site. In this instance you must supply the election authority with a copy of acceptable identification by 7:00 pm the Thursday after Election Day.
        • Your name appears on the list of voters who voted during the early voting period, but you claim not to have voted during that period.
        • You received an absentee ballot but did not retunr the absentee ballot to the election authority.

        By law, you must vote in your assigned precinct for all votes on your provisional ballot to count.

        Provisional ballots are counted after Election Day. The election authority receives all provisional ballots and determines the registration status for each provisional voter within two weeks after the election. If it is determined that you are registered and eligible to vote, your vote will be counted. If you are not registered, your vote will not be counted, but the information you supplied on the affidavit form will serve as a registration application for the next election.

        To find out if your vote was counted, please use your state's provisional ballot tool.

        Provisional Voting

        Because there is Election Day registration, there is no provisional ballot process in New Hampshire.

        Provisional Voting

        You are provided the opportunity to cast a provisional ballot if:

        • You appear to vote and claim to be properly registered and eligible to vote in the election district but your name does not appear on the district register (poll book) and elections officials cannot determine your registration.
        • Regardless of whether your name appears on the general register, you do not have an approved form of identification when you appear to vote in an election district.
        • An election official asserts that you are not eligible to vote. (In a primary election this includes if you claim to be registered for a particular political party, but the district register indicates you are registered as a member of another political party.)

        You are required to vote by provisional ballot if:

        • Your voting as a result of a Federal or State court order.
        • You are voting as a result of an order extending the time established for closing the polls by state law that is in effect 10 days before an election.

        If you vote on a provisional ballot, you will be asked to:

        • Complete and sign the provisional ballot affidavit on the back of the provisional ballot affidavit envelope.
        • Complete a provisional ballot in an accessible and private area of the polling place.
        • Seal the completed provisional ballot in a secrecy envelope.
        • Seal the secrecy envelope in the provisional ballot affidavit envelope.
        • Sign the front of the provisional ballot affidavit envelope.
        • Return the sealed provisional ballot affidavit envelope to a polling place election official.
        • Receive your provisional ballot identification receipt.

        If you already voted by absentee ballot for this election, you will be asked to cancel your absentee ballot. Within seven days after the election, the county board of elections will examine the provisional ballot to determine the validity of your completed provisional ballot. At least seven days after the election, using the information provided to you on the provisional ballot identification receipt, call 1-877-VOTES-PA or visit the department of state. Provide your provisional ballot identification number. You will be told whether your provisional ballot was counted, partially counted or not counted. If your provisional ballot was not counted, you will be told why.

        Provisional Voting

        You will vote by provisional ballot if:

        • Your name is not on the registration list
        • The name and address on the registration list is not the same as the name and address on your ID
        • Your ID is not sufficient
        • You moved to a new precinct within the county
        • You changed your name
        • You were challenged as a qualified voter
        • You requested an early ballot but did not vote an earlly ballot

        The voter is given a provisional voter receipt with information on how to verify the status of the voter's provisional ballot.

        Provisional Voting

        You must be a registered voter in the parish where you vote and eligible to vote in the election for federal office for your provisional ballot to be counted. There are several reasons why you may vote a provisional ballot. Those reasons are:

        • You are in the parish where you are registered to vote and you are voting at the wrong precinct.
        • You are in a precinct that is not in the parish where you are registered to vote.
        • You are not registered to vote in Louisiana, and you enter a precinct to vote.

        For all these instances, you may vote a paper provisional ballot for federal offices, you will not be allowed to vote on the voting machines for state, local or municipal offices, propositions or constitutional amendments.

        If you have cast a provisional ballot and would like to know if it was counted, please utilize your state's resource. Voters should wait at least 7 days after an election to check the status.

        Provisional Voting

        In North Dakota, there is no need for provisional voting, since there is no voter registration process.

        Provisional Voting

        You are eligible to vote a provisional ballot if:

        • You claim to be an eligible voter, but your name does not appear on the list of registered voters, and your registration cannot be determined by the voter registrar
        • You are a designated first-time voter on the list of registered voters, but are unable to produce the required identification
        • You have applied for a ballot by mail, but have not returned it or cancelled it with the main early voting clerk
        • You vote during extended polling hours ordered by a state or federal court
        • You are registered, but are attempting to vote in a precinct other than the one in which you are registered
        • You do not present a voter registration certificate or any other acceptable form of identification
        • You are registered in the precinct, but your address is not located in the political subdivision conducting the election
        • You voted in another party's primary in the primary election

        If you claim to be registered, but your name is not on the list of registered voters, the presiding judge shall call the voter registrar to determine if you are registered. If registration can be confirmed, and you can show identification, you may vote a regular ballot, or be directed to the correct precinct if you are in the wrong precinct. You may vote a provisional ballot, but you must be informed that it will not be counted if:

        • You registered in a different precinct
        • It is indicated on the voter registration list that you voted by mail
        • You have no identification

        Provisional voters will receive a notice in the mail by the 10th day after the election letting them know if their provisional ballots were county, and if they were not counted, the reasons why.

        Texas does offer a limited ballot, but it is not considered a provisional ballot. Limited ballots are available if you have moved from one Texas county to another and are registered to vote in the former county of residence, but your voter registration in the new county will not be effective by election day due to the 30 day required period between registration and the election. This limited ballot is available only during early voting by personal appearance or by mail. The limited ballot contains only offices or propositions to be voted on statewide, or offices or propositions of territorial units of which you were a resident both before and after your move.

        Provisional Voting

        If you are a registered voter in your election district but your name does not appear on the official poll list, you may be able to vote by updating the record of a name or address change or by provisional ballot. Provisional ballots cover only federal offices such as President, Vice President, US Senate and US Congress. To be permitted to vote on a provisional ballot, you will be asked to sign an affidavit that says you are a registered voter in that election district and that you are eligible to vote in that election. If a federal or state court order extends the time established for closing the polls, votes cast after the normal poll closing time will all be by provisional ballot.

        At the time you vote, you will be given information on the free access system set up by the commissioner of elections so that you can determine whether or not your ballot was counted and, if not, the reason why. Ballots are cast on paper and sealed, and you will be assigned a tracking number. The sealed envelopes are delivered to the Department of Elections for each county on the night of the election for verification the next day. If the Department of Elections for your county determines that the provisional ballot is eligible, then the vote is counted.

        Note: You must provide proof of identity and address to vote on a provisional ballot. Acceptable forms of identification are a current, valid photo ID, copy of current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck or other government document that shows your name and address.

        Provisional Voting

        While there is no provisional voting in Minnesota, Election Day registration is available.

        Provisional Voting

        Provisional ballots are issued in the following situations:

        • You claim to be an elector in a jurisdiction, but you are not on the official voter list
        • The registrar determines that you cannot be restored or transferred from another polling place
        • A polling district moderator decides that you may not vote in the primary or election
        • You fail to provide appropriate ID

        If you are requesting a provisional ballot, you should request it from the polling district in which you reside. Registrars of voters will forthwith verify the information contained with each provisional ballot to determine whether you are eligible to vote. They will note their decision on the outer envelope containing the ballot. If they determine that you should have been on the official voting list and that your vote is eligible, they will open and count the vote. Idaho does not offer a provisional ballot in elections where there is no federal office on the ballot.

        Provisional Voting

        Provisional ballots are eligible for verification if cast in correct precinct.

        Provisional Voting

        Provisional voting is available if you do not have identification or are not personally known by the election official, or if your name does not appear on the precinct register at the polling place where you are attempting to vote. You will have to vote a provisional ballot that will be delivered to a regional election office for verification of eligibility before being counted.

        Provisional Voting

        You can vote on federal offices on a provisional ballot in federal elections if you live in the precinct and you find yourself under one of the following circumstances:

        • Your name does not appear on the precinct roster and the registration status cannot be determined by the precinct officer
        • Your name does not appear on the precinct roster and you have been verified as ineligible to vote
        • You do not have identification
        • You are voting as a result of a federal or state court order or any order under state law in effect 10 days prior to Election Day which extends polling hours
        • You have been challenged by all four precinct election officers

        If you want to check if your provisional ballot was counted or not, please go to the Kentucky state board of elections Provisional Voter Information page.

        Provisional Voting

        You have a right to vote with a provisional ballot if any problems arise at the polls. For example, you believe you are registered byt your name is not on the rolls, or if you questions the voting district assigned to you.

        To see if your provisional ballot was counted, please visit your state's tool.

        Provisional Voting

        If you claim to be registered but are not on the list, you can receive a provisional ballot for later verification. Ballots are eligible for verification if votes are cast in the correct precinct. Tennessee does not provide a limited provisional ballot.

        Provisional Voting

        A provisional ballot is a regular ballot issued to a person seeking to vote in a polling place under the following circumstances:

        • Your name does not appear in the poll book
        • Your name is in the poll back but there is an indication that you were issued an absentee ballot and you wish to vote at the polls
        • You fail to produce identification when required
        • Other circumstances as determined by the precinct election official

        After the election you may contact your county elections department to confirm that your ballot was counted.

        Provisional Voting

        Provisional ballots are issued in the following situations:

        • You claim to be an elector in a jurisdiction, but you are not on the official voter list
        • The registrar determines that you cannot be restored or transferred from another polling place
        • A polling district moderator decides that you may not vote in the primary or election
        • You fail to provide appropriate identification

        If you are requesting a provisional ballot, you should request it from the polling district in which you reside. Registrars of voters will forthwith verify the information contained with each provisional ballot to determine whether you are eligible to vote and note their decision on the outer envelope containing the ballot. If they can determine that you should have been on the official voting list and your vote is eligible, they will open and count the vote. Connecticut does not offer a provisional ballot in elections where there is no federal office on the ballot.

        Provisional Voting

        Voters who do not bring picture identification to the polls or do not possess picture identification can vote by signing an affidavit.

        Provisional Voting

        If there is a question about your eligibility as a voter or if you need to vote at a county elections office in a county other than the one in which you live, you will be issued a provisional ballot. In order to obtain a provisional ballot, you need to fill out a provisional ballot request form at the county elections office. Your provisional ballot will not be counted until it is determined that you are eligible to vote. After you have voted the ballot, you can call 1-866-ORE-VOTES or the county elections office in which you voted to find out if your ballot was counted. If it is determined that you are ineligible to vote in this election, the completed provisional ballot request form will serve as your voter registration for future elections.

        Provisional Voting

        Requirements for provisional voting:

        • You attest that you have registered to vote, and are eligible to vote in the correct district and precinct in that election, but there is no evidence of registration
        • An election official asserts that you are not eligible to vote

        Provisional voting procedures:

        An election official at the polling place shall notify you that you may cast a provisional ballot in that election.

        You shall be permitted to cast a provisional ballot at the polling place upon execution of a written affirmation (affirmation for provisional voting) on the registration affidavit form before an election official at the polling place, stating that you are:

        • A registered voter in the jurisdiction where you desire to vote; and
        • eligible to vote in that election

        An election official shall transmit the provisional ballot to the county clerk for prompt verification. If the county clerk determines that you are eligible under state law to vote, then your provisional ballot shall be counted. You will be given a copy of the Registration Affidavit Form (RAF) with the 211 toll free number to call to verify whether their provisional ballot was counted or not, and if not, the reason that the vote was not counted.

        Provisional Voting

        Provisional ballots are eligible for verification in correct precinct. You can check the status of your provisional ballot by using your state's resource.

        Provisional Voting

        You may vote by provisional ballot if your name is not on the voter registration list or if there is a question about your qualifications to vote. The envelope containing the ballot is grouped with other provisional ballots. These ballots are not counted on Election Day. They are set aside for consideration by the county canvassers.

        PROVISIONAL BALLOT VOTING INSTRUCTIONS:

        • Complete a new voter registration card.
        • Mark your ballot and seal it in the envelope provided.
        • Sign the statement on the envelope.

        Provisional Voting

        Provisional voting is available if the ballot was cast in the correct precinct.

        Provisional Voting

        If you are not authorized to vote, are successfully challenged, or are otherwise denied the ability to vote and you maintain that you are currently registered to vote in that precinct, you may cast a ballot which shall be called a provisional ballot. You must complete an affirmation for a provisional ballot. Provisional ballots are not counted on election night. The county auditor will investigate the following day to determine if you were properly registered in that precinct. If the information found determines that you were properly registered, then that provisional ballot will be counted. You will receive notification of whether your provisional ballot was counted or not and if not, an explanation of why it was not counted. By voting a provisional ballot, your vote may not be secret if you are the only one voting on a provisional ballot in that precinct.

        Provisional Voting

        A provisional ballot is a ballot that is marked by a voter but is not counted at the time it is cast. It is issued to a voter who is unable to provide the poll worker with the required documentation. There are two instances where you may vote a provisional ballot:

        • A qualified voter who has been issued a current and valid Wisconsin driver's license registers to vote at a polling place on election day, but cannot list the driver's license number on the registration
        • A first-time Wisconsin voter who registers by mail but does not provide an identifying document establishing proof of residence at the time they submit the registration form and is unable to provide the required proof of residence at the polling place.

        Provisional ballots are not given if the voter is in the wrong polling place or when a person is attempting to register in person at the polling place but does not provide proof of residence.

        The provisional ballot will not be counted unless the voter provides the required information to the poll workers or the municipal clerk by 4pm on the Friday following the election.

        Provisional Voting

        Voters whose eligibility to vote is not immediately established on Election Day will vote using a provisional ballot. The most common reasons for voting provisionally are:

        • You are not in the correct precinct
        • Your name is not in the poll book
        • Official records show that you voted by mail or in early voting
        • You did not show the required ID
        • You moved within the state, but did not update your address

        Provisional ballots will be counted after the voters' eligibility is confirmed and no later than 14 days after a General Election. Voters who appear to vote in the wrong precinct in their county, and choose to vote a provisional ballot rather than go to their correct polling place, will have their federal and statewide races and issues counted.

        A provisional ballot affidavit is treated as a voter registration application for the next election, regardless of whether the provisional ballot is counted, as long as the affidavit contains all the required information and the voter is eligible to register.

        Provisional Voting

        If your name is not on the voting list, you will be able to vote using a provisional ballot. You will be asked to sign a roster and provide your name, address, signature, date of birth, and political party affiliation if applicable. You will be asked to show suitable identification showing your name and current address. If you do not provide suitable identification, your provisional ballot may not be counted.

        You must fill out a provisional ballot affirmation declaring that you are a registered voter in the city or town and reside within the precinct. Once you have completed the affidavit, a poll worker will put a number on your provisional ballot envelope and on the roster, mark the ballot with the word provisional and hand you the ballot with the provisional ballot envelope. You will cast your vote on this ballot, seal it in the envelope, and hand it back to a poll worker. You will receive an information sheet telling you how you can find out if your ballot was counted. A provisional ballot will be counted if your voter eligibility is verified. To find out if your provisional ballot was counted, call the Secretary of the Commonwealth Elections Division at 800-462-8683 or 617-727-2828 or ask you local municipal election official. The information will be available seven days after a primary election and twenty days after a general election.

        Provisional Voting

        There are several reason a voter may vote a provisional ballot:

        • If your name is not on the pollbook and you believe you are registered in that precinct and the registrar's office cannot be reached to verify your registration status
        • If you do not show one of the acceptable forms of ID
        • If you registered by mail on or after January 1, 2003 and did not mail a copy of your ID at that time, fails to show one of the federally required forms of ID when voting for the first time in a federal election
        • If you were sent an absentee ballot but did not receive or lost the ballot or had returned the ballot and also appears at the regular polling place on Election Day
        • If the normal voting hours are extended by court order
        • If the pollbook shows that you have already cast a ballot in the current election

        If you are asked to vote a provisional ballot your ballot will be sealed in a green envelope. You must provide all information requested on both sides of the envelope and sign the Statement of Voter. The election official will tell you when and where the Electoral Board will meet and will give you a phone number to call and find out the states of your provisional ballot.

        Your provisional ballot will not be counted on Election Day. Your local Electoral Board will meet the day after the election to begin its determination of provisional votes. The votes of qualified voters will then be counted and included in the results for your area.

        You are allowed to be present when the Election Board meets to determine if your vote was valid.

        Voters who do not bring a form of ID to the polls will be given the opportunity to vote a provisional ballot. Once you complete the provisional ballot, you will be given written instructions from the election official on how to submit a copy of your ID so that your vote can be counted. All information on how to submit the proper ID will be given at this time.

        You will have until noon on the Friday following the election to deliver a copy of the ID to the local election board in order for the provisional ballot to be counted. You can submit your ID through fax, email, in person or through the USPS or a commercial delivery service. The copy of ID must be delivered by noon on Friday, a Friday postmark does not count.

        Provisional Voting

        Provisional voting allows you to cast a ballot in person even if the requirements for doing so cannot be met at the time. The provisional ballot will county if the problem is solved within three days after Election Day. The three reasons for voting a provisional ballot are:

        • You are unable to show the required forms of photo ID when you vote in person
        • When you first registered to vote in Georgia you registered by mail, did not provide any identification at the time and are unable to present acceptable identification the first time you vote in person
        • Your name does not appear on the list of registered voters in the precinct

        If you vote a provisional ballot because you did not have acceptable identification, you will have three days from the close of the polls to present acceptable identification to your county registrar office for your vote to count.

        Provisional Voting

        You will be asked to vote a provisional ballot for at least one of the following reasons:

        • Your name is not in the precinct register
        • The precinct register indications that you are provisionally registered, which has not been resolved
        • You have claimed registration with Motor Vehicle Division or other agency, which could not be immediately confirmed
        • You swore that you were eligible to vote due to not receiving or destroying your absentee ballot
        • Your right to vote was challenged at the polls
        • Your ID was insufficient and/or did not include a valid form of ID
        • You failed to sign the register
        • You are a late registrant who voted provisionally

        If necessary, you must provide clear and convincing evidence either on Election Day or by 5pm the day after the election in order to verify your identity and/or eligibility to have your provisional ballot counted. You may provide this information in person, by fax, by email or by mail postmarked by the day after election day.

        Provisional Voting

        A provisional ballot is voted the same as any other ballot except you must sign an affidavit attesting to your eligibility to vote. If your name is not on the poll list, the provisional ballot will be counted only if the county board of registrars is able to confirm, after the election, that you are a duly qualified elector of the county.

        When you cast a provisional ballot because you did not have proper identification at the polling place, you have until 5:00 pm on the Monday following the election to submit the ID to the board of registrars. If proper ID is submitted by this deadline, the ballot will be counted. You may also cast a provisional ballot if you did not receive a requested absentee ballot or did not vote the absentee ballot.

        To find instructions on how to cast a provisional ballot visit your state's resource.

        To find out if your provisional ballot was counted, use your state's provisional ballot tool.

        Provisional Voting

        If your name is not on the list of registered voters, or if someone challenges your right to vote, you have the right to cast a provisional ballot. Your ballot will be put in an envelope. The envelope has a place for you to explain why you believe that the ballot should count. A special board will meet after Election Day to look at your registration record and the information you have provided. The board will then decide if your ballot can be counted. Before you leave the polls, you will be given a written notice explaining your voting rights and listing the date on which the special ballot board will meet. If your ballot is not counted, you will receive a letter in the mail explaining why it cannot be counted.

        Provisional Voting

        Provisional voting is permitted and is eligible for verification if cast in correct jurisdiction. You will be issued a provisional ballot if your name does not appear on the roster or you do not provide the required identification. You can check the status of your provisional ballot by contacting your county clerk's office.

        Provisional Voting

        You are entitled to cast a provisional ballot if:

        • A poll manager or any voter has reason to believe that you might be ineligible to vote
        • Your name does not appear on the voter registration rolls

        All provisional ballots are kept separate and not counted on election night. It will be counted if your registration is verified. You will be given written instructions on the time and place of the provisional ballot hearings and, if the voter registration office can determine you were registered, the provisional ballot will be counted. You can check the status of your provisional ballot online.

        Provisional Voting

        If there is a question about your eligibility to vote in an election, you may vote a provisional ballot. You might vote a provisional ballot if:

        • Your registration record is not available at the time of the election
        • Your signature in the poll book does not match the signature on the registration record
        • The registration record indicates any other legal disqualifications

        The canvassing board will review the information associated with the ballot and will determine whether or not your vote can be counted. Your ballot will not be opened on election night. To check on the status of your provisional ballot, please use your state's tool.

        Provisional Voting

        You may be asked to vote a provisional ballot at the polls due to one of the following reasons:

        • Your name is not on the official roster of voters and the election officer cannot verify your voting eligibility on Election Day. The elections official's office will then check the registration records. If further research determines that you are eligible to vote in the election, the provisional ballot will be counted.
        • You have moved within the county, but did not re-register to vote. The elections official will verify your prior registration before the provisional ballot will be counted. Your registration will then be updated with your current address.
        • Records indicate that you requested an absentee ballot and you fail to turn in the absentee ballot at the polls on Election Day. The election official's office will check the records, and if you did not vote an absentee ballot, your provisional ballot will be counted.
        • You are a first-time federal election voter in the county and were unable to provide the required proof of identification. The elections official's office will verify your eligibility to vote by comparing the signature on your registration with the signature on the provisional ballot envelope.

        Provisional ballots are counted during the official canvass when:

        • Prior to the completion of the official canvass (the vote tally), the elections official's office establishes, from voter registration records, your right to vote the ballot.
        • Or by order of the Superior Court in the county of your residence, you seek a court order to require that your ballot be counted, at any time prior to the completion of the official canvass. Any judicial action or appeal shall have priority over all other civil matters.

        The Help America Vote Act of 2002 (HAVA) requires each state or local elections official to establish a "Free Access System," such as a toll-free telephone number for voters to call or an internet website that you can access free of charge, to ascertain whether or not your provisional vote was counted, and, if it was not counted, the reason why it was not counted. For information about how to access each county's Provisional Voting Free Access System, please visit your state's resource.

        Provisional Voting

        A provisional ballot allows someone who thinks they are an eligible voter to vote. You might vote a provisional ballot if:

        • You are not listed on the precinct register
        • You need to show ID because you are voting for the first time in Maryland and have not previously met the ID requirements and you do not provide an ID at the polls
        • Your voter registration is pending because you did not provide an ID number on your voter registration application or the number you provided could not be verified
        • You have moved more than 21 days before election day, did not notify election officials and showed up to vote at the polling place for your prior address
        • The precinct register shows that you already received an absentee ballot for this election or have already voted
        • Your right to vote was challenged and you did not show ID
        • You voted during extended voting hours. If a court orders that polling places stay open longer than 8pm, all voters who vote during these extended hours must vote by provisional ballot

        For instances where you voted a provisional ballot because you did not provide ID you must show ID or an ID number to your local board of elections before 10am on the 2nd Wednesday after election day.

        Provisional Voting

        If you do not show proof of identity, you may vote only by provisional ballot. You must fill out and sign an affidavit that explains why the provisional ballot should be counted. After election day, County Election Board officials will investigate the information provided and will either approve the provisional ballot or will reject it. In order for the provisional ballot to be approved, the information on the affidavit must match the information in your voter registration record.

        Provisional Voting

        A provisional ballot is only used if a person trying to vote at the polling place is not on the checklist and cannot affirm they registered to vote by the deadline.

        Provisional ballots are eligible if they are cast in the correct jurisdiction.

        Provisional Voting

        You may cast a provisional ballot. For more information check your state's resource.

        Voters must cast their provisional ballot in the correct polling place in order for it to be counted.

        Voters receive a provisional ballot if:

        • their registration cannot be verified at the polls
        • an absentee ballot has been issued but the voter fails to bring it to the polls
        • voter fails to provide proper ID
        • the polling hours are extended (these provisional ballots are segregated from all other provisional ballots).

        If registered and eligible to vote, and voters’ signature on the provisional ballot matches the signature of the voters’ registration form, the ballot is counted, if it's cast in the correct polling place. If not registered, vote is not counted.  If a voter voted a provisional ballot for other reasons (for example, eligibility was challenged, they were in the wrong precinct when they voted, they did not appear on the precinct register, etc.), voters have the opportunity to bring in evidence to their respective supervisor of elections no later than 5 p.m., of the second day following the election. The local canvassing board will examine the provisional ballot certificate, and any and all other information and evidence, if anything is available. The board must count provisional ballots unless the board determines, based on preponderance of the evidence, that a voter was not entitled to vote.

         

         

         

        Provisional Voting

        Provisional voting is one of the election reform measures provided to guarantee every qualified and registered voter has the opportunity to vote on Election Day.

        If your name does not appear on the poll book and you are eligible to vote at that precinct, you may be entitled to vote a provisional ballot. Every effort will be made to determine your eligibility and your correct polling place so you can cast a regular ballot.

        Provisional Voting

        If you believe you are registered to vote in a precinct, but your name does not appear on the poll list, or if you have been challenged as not qualified to vote in your precinct, you will cast a provisional ballot. A provisional ballot permits you to vote on Election Day. However, your provisional ballot will be kept separate from the other ballots cast in that precinct. After Election Day, the county election board will decide if you were qualified to vote in that precinct, and if your ballot should be counted. You will be able to contact your county election board to find out if your ballot was counted, and if not, why not.

        Provisional Voting

        Provisional ballots are paper ballots that are used at the polling place on election day under the following circumstances:

        • If your registration information is missing or is incomplete in the poll book
        • You moved from your registered address to another in the same county and did not notify your local election officials
        • You did not provide the required ID information on your registration form or you're a first time registrant by mail in New Jersey and your ID numbers could not be verified and you did not show ID to the poll workers at the polling place.
        • There is a marking in the poll book that you applied for an absentee ballot but you did not apply for one, you applied for one but did not receive it, or you received it but did not return it
        • If you vote a provisional ballot because you did not provide the proper ID you have until the close of business on the second day after the election to provide your county commissioner of registration with the required ID information for your provisional ballot to count. You will be given instructions at your polling place on where to bring the ID.

        Provisional Voting

        You may use a provisional ballot if:

        • Your name does not appear on the list of registered voters for the voting district or the community but you claim to have registered to vote
        • Your name does not appear on the list of registered voters for the voting district but does appear on the community list and you contend you are voting in the correct voting district
        • You do not have an approved form of identification as required
        • You have been challenged by an election official
        • The precinct voting list indicates the voter has applied for a mail or emergency ballot
        • In a primary only - the voter claims they are unaffiliated or affiliated with a different party than indicated on the precinct voter list.

        The board of elections begins tabulating provisional ballots at approximately 5:00 pm the day after the election. Provisional ballot results are added to candidate totals only after all provisional ballots cast in the state have been counted. It is expected that the tabulation process will be concluded that evening and the results will be available sometime that night. Provisional ballots are eligible for verification if cast in the correct precinct.You may then determine the disposition of their ballot by visiting your board of elections.

        Provisional Voting

        Voters can request that a provisional ballot be mailed to them by contacting their County Auditor's office. Provisional ballot means a ballot issued to a voter who would otherwise be denied an opportunity to vote a regual ballot, for any reason authorized by the Help America Vote Act, including but not limited to the following:

        • The voter's name does not appear in the list of registered voters for the county
        • There is an indication in the voter registration system that the voter has already voted in the primary, special election, or general election, but the voter wishes to vote again
        • There is a question on the part of the voter concerning the issues or candidates on which the voter is qualitifed to vote
        • Any other reason allowed by law.

        After the election you may contact your county elections department to confirm that your ballot was counted.

        Provisional Voting

        If your name is not on the precinct voter registration list, or you do not show a valid photo ID, the election official shall permit you to vote only under the following conditions:

        • You identify yourself by stating your name, date of birth and that you are verified by the county clerk as a registered voter within the county
        • You affirm your current residence and the election official verifies with the county clerk that your residence is within the precinct
        • You complete an updated voter registration application form
        • You sign the precinct voter registration list

        If you are not listed on the precinct voter registration list and the election official is unable to verify your registration with the county clerk and you contend that you are eligible to vote, then you may vote a challenged ballot which shall only be counted upon verification of your registration status by the county board of election commissioners prior to certification of the election.

        If your ballot is challenged, the election officials in the election precinct will make and retain a list of the names of all persons who are challenged and the procedure shall be as follows:

        • You will separate your marked ballot and ballot stub
        • You will place the challenged ballot in a single challenged ballot envelope and seal the envelope
        • You will place the ballot stub and the sealed challenged ballot envelope and the challenge form in a challenged voter envelope
        • The ballots of all challenged persons shall be preserved, secured, and separated from the remaining ballots to the end that the right of any person to vote may be determined later by the county board of election commissioners
        • The county board shall, prior to certification of the results of the election, determine whether the challenged ballots are valid

        The election official will provide the voter with written instructions on how to determine whether the provisional vote was counted and,if not, the reason the vote was not counted. (Inmost cases, the election commission will mail a notice to the voter.)

        If you have to cast a Provisional Ballot because your registration status could not be confirmed:

        • If your name is not included on the precinct voter registration list and if the election official at the poll cannot verify the voter's status as a registered voter in the county, that voter is entitled to cast a Provisional Ballot if he or she contends to be a registered voter in the precinct in which he or she desires to vote.
        • The election official will ask you to provide a current, valid photo ID or a copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, government check,paycheck or other government document that shows the name and address of the voter. If you fail to provide this ID, the election official will note it on the precinct voter list.
        • The election official will write your name and address on the list of provisional voters.
        • The election official will provide a Voter Affirmation form on which you affirm that you are a registered voter in the precinct and are eligible to vote in the election.
        • When the affirmation is completed, the election official will provide the proper ballot to you.
        • You may then mark the ballot.
        • Then you should place the marked ballot into the Provisional Ballot envelope and seal it.
        • Then you should then place the Voter Affirmation (if the affirmation is a separate piece of paper and not printed on the envelope) in the Provisional Voter envelope.
        • The election official shall provide you with written instructions on how to determine whether or not the provisional vote was counted, and, if not, the reason the vote was not counted. (In most cases, the election commission will mail a notice to the voter.)

        Provisional Voting

        If your eligibility to vote is questioned on Election Day, you are allowed to cast a challenged ballot. A challenged ballot must be counted the same as a regular ballot. The validity of a challenged ballot need not be determined unless it affects the results of an election.

        Provisional Voting

        A provisional ballot is used to record a vote if the voter's eligibility is in question and the voter would otherwise not be allowed to vote. There are several scenarios where a voter may cast a provisional ballot:

        • Your name does not appear on the official poll list for the precinct or an election official asserts that you are not eligible to vote or is unable to determine your eligibility
        • You are unable or decline to provide the required proof of identity
        • Your name appears on the official poll list for that precinct as having already requested an absentee ballot
        • Your name is marked on the poll list or signature book with a notation that certain registration mailings have been returned as undeliverable
        • A hearing on a challenge to your eligibility as an elector has been postponed until after Election Day
        • Your signature, in the opinion of the precinct officers, does not match the signature on your registration form
        • Your eligibility to cast a ballot has been challenged by the precinct officials

        Before your provisional ballot can be included in the official count of an election, the board of elections must confirm your eligibility to cast the ballot, as well as the validity of the ballot that you cast. If you cast a provisional ballot and provided acceptable proof of identity, you typically do not need to provide any additional information. However, if you cast a provisional ballot and did not provide acceptable proof of identity at the time of voting, you must appear in person at the board of elections no later than seven days following the election to provide such proof within the 10 days immediately following Election Day. Acceptable proof of identity includes:

        • Current and valid photo ID
        • A military identification
        • A copy of a current (within the last 12 months) utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or other government document (not a voter registration acknowledgement mailed by the board of elections) that shows your name and current address
        • The last four digits of your Social Security number

         

        Provisional Voting

        Provisional voting was mandated to ensure that every eligible voter who is registered or who believes they are registered can cast a ballot in federal elections with the knowledge that a fair process will be followed to determine if the provisional ballot is eligible to be counted. You may vote a provisional ballot if:

        • You moved anywhere in the state but did not reregister at your new address. You will be allowed to vote a provisional ballot at your new polling location
        • You registered through any public agency but your name does not appear on the Official Register. You will be allowed to vote a provisional ballot at your new polling location

        All provisional voters will be asked for photo ID and/or proof of current residence at the polls.

        You will be given instructions on how to view the status of your provisional ballot. If you have any questions please call the Lieutenant Governor's Office at 801-538-1041 or 1800-995-VOTE. Please allow 10-14 days after each election for this information to be available.

        Voting Machines

        The voting systems used in Florida are optical scan and DRE.

        Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

        Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

        There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

        Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a pages. where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. Some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

        You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC).

        Voting Machines

        The voting systems used in Missouri are optical scan and punch card.

        Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

        Punchcards: With a punchcard system, when you sign in at the polling place, the poll workers will give you one or more cards. These cards are usually about 8 inches by 3 inches, with small rectangles that can be punched out. You take your cards to a small private table. You'll see a booklet mounted on a frame. The frame will have a place for you to slide your first card in. Make sure that it's in all the way and lined up correctly. If you're not sure, ask one of the poll workers to make sure you've got it right. The table also has a little device (often a metal stylus or stick) that you use to punch holes next to the name of the person or ballot measure you want to vote for. Give it a firm punch, so it pushes out that little cardboard rectangle or chad. You may have to look at the booklet carefully so that you punch the right hole lined up with the person you want to vote for. Often there is a little arrow that helps you find the right hole. Some punchcards have the names of the candidates written right on the cards. You may need to vote on more than one card. Look it over carefully, so you put the right card in the right slot. Some punch card systems use both sides of the card, so look on the back of each card too. Check to see that all the holes are punched all the way through and there are no little pieces of cardboard (chad) hanging from your card. When you are done, pick up all your cards. There may be an envelope to put your cards in. Take your cards over to the ballot box and put the cards into the box.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

        Voting Machines

        The voting machine systems used in Indiana are optical scan and DRE.

        Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

        Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

        There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

        Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. Some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

        You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

        Voting Machines

        The voting system used in New Jersery is DRE.

        Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

        There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

        Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

        You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

        Voting Machines

        The voting systems used in Rhode Island are optical scan and DRE.

        Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

        Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

        There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

        Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

        You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

        Voting Machines

        Washington is a mail in ballot state. The public may observe the processing of mail ballots. You may contact your County Auditor to arrange times to observe. Ballots are tabulated on optical scan and digital scan tabulating equipment. The equipment must be able to determine the ballot format for every ballot. Bar codes on each ballot allow the tabulation equipment to immediately determine the ballot format of that ballot, which allows the equipment to correctly read the ballot. For more information about ballot barcodes and this process please use your state's resource tool.

        Voting Machines

        The voting systems used in Arkansas are optical scan and DRE.

        Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

        Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

        There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

        Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

        You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

        iVotronic Touch Screen: With system the voter uses a touch screen to place their votes. This system prevents voters from casting two votes in a single race and alerts the voter of races with no votes cast. It includes a paper receipt that remains in the machine but allows voters to see their individual votes to verify the machine records them correctly.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

        Voting Machines

        The voting systems used in Maine are optical scan and paper ballots.

        Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

        Paper Ballots: Paper ballots are one of the oldest ways of voting in America. They are still used in a few places on Election Day. When you come to the polling place, you will get a paper ballot from the poll worker. You take it to the voting booth, and use a pen or pencil to mark a box next to your candidate and issue choices. You then drop the marked ballot into a sealed ballot box.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

        Voting Machines

        The voting systems used in Ohio are optical scan and DRE.

        Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

        Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

        There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

        Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

        You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

        Voting Machines

        The voting system used in Utah is DRE.

        Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

        There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

        Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

        You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

        Voting Machines

        The voting systems used in D.C. are optical scan and DRE.

        Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

        Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

        There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

        Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. Some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

        You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

        Voting Machines

        The voting systems used in Mississippi are DRE and paper ballots.

        Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

        There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

        Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

        You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

        Paper Ballots: Paper ballots are one of the oldest ways of voting in America. They are still used in a few places on Election Day. When you come to the polling place, you will get a paper ballot from the poll worker. You take it to the voting booth, and use a pen or pencil to mark a box next to your candidate and issue choices. You then drop the marked ballot into a sealed ballot box.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

        Voting Machines

        The voting systems used in Illinois are optical scan and DRE.

        To find out what voting machine is used in your county, please visit your state's resource.

        p>Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

         

        Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

        There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

        Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. Some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

        You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

        Voting Machines

        The voting systems used in New Hampshire are optical scan and paper ballots.

        Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

        Paper Ballots: Paper ballots are one of the oldest ways of voting in America. They are still used in a few places on Election Day. When you come to the polling place, you will get a paper ballot from the poll worker. You take it to the voting booth, and use a pen or pencil to mark a box next to your candidate and issue choices. You then drop the marked ballot into a sealed ballot box.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

        Voting Machines

        The voting systems used in Pennsylvania are optical scan, DRE, and paper ballots.

        Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

        Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

        There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

        Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

        You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

        Paper Ballots: Paper ballots are one of the oldest ways of voting in America. They are still used in a few places on Election Day. When you come to the polling place, you will get a paper ballot from the poll worker. You take it to the voting booth, and use a pen or pencil to mark a box next to your candidate and issue choices. You then drop the marked ballot into a sealed ballot box.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

        Voting Machines

        The voting systems used in Arizona are optical scan and DRE.

        Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

        Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

        There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

        Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

        You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

        Voting Machines

        The voting system used in Louisiana is DRE.

        Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

        There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

        Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

        You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

        Voting Machines

        The voting systems used in North Dakota are optical scan and DRE.

        Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

        Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

        There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

        Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

        You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

        Voting Machines

        The voting systems used in Texas are optical scan, DRE and paper ballots.

        Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

        Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

        There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

        Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

        You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

        Paper Ballots: Paper ballots are one of the oldest ways of voting in America. They are still used in a few places on Election Day. When you come to the polling place, you will get a paper ballot from the poll worker. You take it to the voting booth, and use a pen or pencil to mark a box next to your candidate and issue choices. You then drop the marked ballot into a sealed ballot box.

        The following vendors are currently certified by the State of Texas:

        • Diebold Electronic Systems, Inc. (Accu-Vote TS)
        • Election Systems and Software, Inc. (AutoMARK 1.0, iVotronic v.8.0.1.0.)
        • Hart Intercivic, Inc. (eSlate v.5.0, v.3.3)

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

        Voting Machines

        The voting system used in Delaware is DRE.

        Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

        There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

        Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. Some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

        You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC).

        Voting Machines

        The voting systems used in Minnesota are optical scan and paper ballots.

        Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

        Paper Ballots: Paper ballots are one of the oldest ways of voting in America. They are still used in a few places on Election Day. When you come to the polling place, you will get a paper ballot from the poll worker. You take it to the voting booth, and use a pen or pencil to mark a box next to your candidate and issue choices. You then drop the marked ballot into a sealed ballot box.

        Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

        There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

        Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

        You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commissions (EAC) resource.

        Voting Machines

        The voting systems used in Idaho are optical scan and hand-counted paper ballots. Hand-counted paper ballots are used only for elections in sparsely populated jurisdictions, particularly when all offices will be filled by write in votes.

        Optical Scanning: With this system, you will recieve a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. In some places, you can check your card or paper right there at the polling place by feeding it into a card-reading machine to make sure you have voted the way you want to. When you are finished filling out all the cards. You may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that counts the votes. When Election Day is over, the computer counts how many votes were cast for each candidate.

        Paper Ballots: Paper ballots are one of the oldest ways of voting in America. They are still used on Election Day. Paper ballots are mostly used for absentee ballots. When you come to the polling place, you will get a paper ballot from the poll worker. You take it to the voting booth, and use a pen or pencil to mark a box next to your candidate and issue choices. You then drop the marked ballot into a sealed ballot box. At the end of the day, votes are counted by poll workers reading the ballots.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

        Voting Machines

        The voting system used in Nevada is DRE.

        Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

        There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

        Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

        You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

        Voting Machines

        The voting systems used in Alaska are optical scan, touch screen-paper ballots and hand count.

        Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

        Touch Screen-Paper ballots: These units used in Alaska have a voter verifiable paper trail that allows the voter to verify the printed version of the ballot prior to casting the ballot. When voting on a touch screen, the voter has the option of having the ballot on the screen and/or listen to an audio version of the ballot and using a keypad to make the selection. Like the optical scan, when the polls close, the election board ends the election on the touch screen and then transmit results either via telephone line (for optical scan precincts) or by calling in the results to the regional office (for hand-count precincts).

        Hand Count: These precincts are those precincts that are in rural areas of the state with fewvoters. After the polls close, the election boards tally the ballots using prepared tally books and then call in the results to the appropriate regional office. The regional offices then data enter the results into the regional GEMS computer and uploads the results to the GEMS system in the Director's Office via modem connection. There are 133 hand-count precincts in Alaska.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

        Voting Machines

        The voting systems used in Kentucky are optical scan and DRE.

        Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

        Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

        There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

        Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

        You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

        Voting Machines

        The voting systems used in North Carolina are optical scan, DRE, and hand-counted paper ballots.

        Optical Scanning: With this system, you will recieve a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. In some places, you can check your card or paper right there at the polling place by feeding it into a card-reading machine to make sure you have voted the way you want to. When you are finished filling out all the cards. You may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that counts the votes. When Election Day is over, the computer counts how many votes were cast for each candidate.

        Direct Recording Electronic (DRE) : This is the newest kind of system in use in the US. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen, like a TV or computer screen. The poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session. These devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these bigscreen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to votefor (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Some of these machinese have a key pad, and/ or have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for. You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad. The votes are stored on a computer device like a disk or a cartridge. At the end of the day, results from the disk or cartridge can be printed and read at the polling place or transferred to a central location.

        Paper Ballots: Paper ballots are one of the oldest ways of voting in America. They are still used on Election Day. Paper ballots are mostly used for absentee ballots. When you come to the polling place, you will get a paper ballot from the poll worker. You take it to the voting booth, and use a pen or pencil to mark a box next to your candidate and issue choices. You then drop the marked ballot into a sealed ballot box. At the end of the day, votes are counted by poll workers reading the ballots.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) (EAC) resource.

        Voting Machines

        The voting systems used in Tennessee are optical scan and DRE.

        Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

        Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

        There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

        Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

        You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

        Voting Machines

        The voting systems used in Wyoming are optical scan and DRE.

        Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

        Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

        There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

        Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

        You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

        Voting Machines

        The voting systems used in Connecticut are the optical scan and DRE.

        Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil, fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. In some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device which checks your card or paper on site to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

        Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen, such as a TV or computer screen.

        There are many variations of DREs because many companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card which you slide into a device to start your voting session.

        Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one screen. Often, with these big screen devices, you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. Some have a keyboard, so that you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

        You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

        Vote by phone: This option is available at every polling place for voters with disabilities or for any voter who prefers this option.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

        Voting Machines

        The voting system used in Michigan is optical scan.

        Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

        Voting Machines

        The voting machine systems used in Hawaii are optical scan and DRE.

        Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

        Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

        There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

        Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

        You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

        Voting Machines

        The voting systems used in Nebraska are optical scan and DRE.

        Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

        Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

        There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

        Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

        You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC)

        Voting Machines

        The voting systems used in Kansas are optical scan, DRE and paper ballots. To find out what system(s) your county uses, click here.

        Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

        Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

        There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

        Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. Some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

        You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

        Paper Ballots: Paper ballots are one of the oldest ways of voting in America. They are still used in a few places on Election Day. When you come to the polling place, you will get a paper ballot from the poll worker. You take it to the voting booth, and use a pen or pencil to mark a box next to your candidate and issue choices. You then drop the marked ballot into a sealed ballot box.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC) resource.

        Voting Machines

        The voting machine systems used in New York are optical scan, DRE and lever.

        Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

        Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

        There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

        Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

        You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

        Mechanical Lever Machines: On mechanical lever voting machines, the name of each candidate or ballot issue choice is assigned a particular lever in a rectangular array of levers on the front of the machine. A set of printed strips visible to the voters identifies the lever assignment for each candidate and issue choice. The levers are horizontal in their unvoted positions.The voter enables the machine with a lever that also closes a privacy curtain. The voter pulls down selected levers to indicate choices. When the voter exits the booth by opening the privacy curtain with the handle, the voted levers are automatically returned to their original horizontal position. As each lever returns, it causes a connected counter wheel within the machine to turn one-tenth of a full rotation. The counter wheel, serving as the ones position of the numerical count for the associated lever, drives a tens counter one-tenth of a rotation for each of its full rotations. The tens counter similarly drives a hundreds counter. If all mechanical connections are fully operational during the voting period, and the counters are initially set to zero, the position of each counter at the close of the polls indicates the number of votes cast on the lever that drives it. Interlocks in the machine prevent the voter from voting for more choices than permitted.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the voting machine summary of the New York State Board of Elections.

        Voting Machines

        The voting systems used in South Dakota are optical scan and paper ballots.

        Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

        Paper Ballots: Paper ballots are one of the oldest ways of voting in America. They are still used in a few places on Election Day. When you come to the polling place, you will get a paper ballot from the poll worker. You take it to the voting booth, and use a pen or pencil to mark a box next to your candidate and issue choices. You then drop the marked ballot into a sealed ballot box.

        You can learn more about voting systems by checking out the Elections Assistance Commission's (EAC)

        Voting Machines

        The voting systems used in Wisconsin are optical scan, DRE, mechanical lever machine and paper ballots.

        Optical Scan: With this system, you will receive a card or sheet of paper, which you take over to a private table or booth. The card has the names of the various candidates and ballot measures printed on it. With a pen or pencil you fill in a little box or circle or the space between two arrows. When you are finished filling out all the cards, you may bring the cards over to a ballot box, where poll workers will show you how to put the cards in the box. Or in some places, you may feed the completed cards or papers into a computer device that checks your card or paper right there at the polling place to make sure you have voted the way you want to and counts the votes.

        Direct Recording Electronic (DRE): This is the newest kind of system in use in the U.S. All the information about who and what you are voting for is on an electronic screen like a TV or computer screen.

        There are many variations of DREs because lots of companies are inventing new ones, and many cities, counties and states are trying them out. Usually, after you have signed in, the poll workers will give you a card that you slide into a device to start your voting session.

        Some of these devices will show all of the candidates and ballot choices on one big screen. Often, with these big screen devices you push a button next to the name of the candidate you want to vote for (or yes or no on a ballot measure). On other DREs, the screen is set up to show pages. On each screen or page, there will probably be one thing to vote on. For example, on one screen or page, you might vote for president. Then you might move to the next page to vote for senator. Often these small-screen devices have a touch screen, where you touch the screen next to the name of the person you want to vote for. Other devices have a key pad. And some have a keyboard, so you can write in the name of someone you want to vote for.

        You let the system know you are finished voting by pushing a button, touching the screen or entering something on a keypad.

        Paper Ballots: Paper ballots are one of the oldest ways of voting in America. They are still used in a few places on Election Day.